Events and Programs

NEHGS events in and around Boston

Learn with NEHGS experts and partner organizations at dozens of lectures, seminars, workshops, and other events, offered each year at the NEHGS research library and in the greater Boston area. Recent seminar topics have included Irish research, digital preservation, identifying family photographs, organizing your family history, writing and publishing your family history, and many more.

| February | March | Conferences | Exhibits | Online Events |

February

February 21 - New Visitor Tour
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
10:00 AM–11:00 AM Cost: FREE

This free orientation and tour introduces you to the resources available at the NEHGS research facility. Founded in 1845, NEHGS is the country's oldest and largest nonprofit genealogy library and archive. With more than 15 million artifacts, books, manuscripts, microfilms, journals, photographs, and records—and expert staff to help you navigate it all—NEHGS provides the access you need to research your family history. You do not have to be a member to participate. Tour attendees are welcome to use our resources following the tour. No registration necessary.

February 21 - CANCELLED - The Évian Conference and the Creation of a Jewish Legacy in the Dominican Republic
In partnership with the Jewish Heritage Center at NEHGS
Presented by Hugh Baver
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
6:00 PM–7:30 PM Cost: FREE

By 1938, nearly 150,000 German Jews had fled Nazi rule. Many sought refuge in the United States and elsewhere, but were turned away due to anti-Semitic immigration quotas and policies. In response to growing pressure, President Franklin D. Roosevelt convened the Évian Conference in Évian-les-Bains, France to discuss the fate of Europe’s fleeing Jews. Delegates from thirty-two countries met, but only one nation agreed to welcome these refugees: the Dominican Republic. Join Hugh Baver, Chairman of Sosúa75, to learn more about the conference—its context, content, and participants—and how the settlement on the North Coast of the Dominican Republic, Sosúa, came to be. This event has been cancelled; it will be rescheduled, date TBD.

February 27 - Book Event: Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare
Presented by author Giles Milton
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
6:00 PM–7:30 PM Cost: FREE

Six Gentlemen, one goal: the destruction of Hitler's war machine. Operating under a total veil of secrecy to carry out guerrilla attacks against top Nazi officials and chosen by Churchill himself, the Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare was a well hidden detail of the Second World War for decades. Join Giles Milton, author of Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks who Plotted Hitler's Defeat, to learn more about the incredible men and women in this inner circle who helped defeat the Nazi regime. Books sales and signing to follow. Register today.

March

March 2 - The 1919 Boston Police Strike Project
Part of our First Friday lecture series
Presented by Margaret R. Sullivan
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
12:00–1:00 PM Cost: FREE

On September 9, 1919 Boston police officers went on strike in hopes of gaining long promised improvements in wages and working conditions. Of the force’s 1,544 men, 1,177 walked off the job. For the next few days, the city of Boston experienced an outbreak of looting, rioting, and general lawlessness. None of the strikers ever worked as Boston police officers again. Relying on volunteer genealogists, the 1919 Boston Police Strike Project aims to document and preserve the lives of the police officers involved in this highly influential labor strike which had lasting effects in the City of Boston and across the United States. By September 9, 2019—the centennial of the strike—the group hopes to have compiled a biographical encyclopedia documenting each of the officers for the benefit of researchers, historians, students, and others, including family members of the strike. Join Margaret R. Sullivan, Records Manager and Archivist at the Boston Police Department Archives to learn more about the stages of this collaborative project and how you might use it in your own research upon completion. Register today!

March 5 - Researching Your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestors
Part of the Ulster Historical Foundation North American Lecture Tour
Presented by Fintan Mullan and Gillian Hunt
NEHGS Library and Archives, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM Cost: $85, includes breakfast and lunch

Explore your Irish heritage with the experts at the Ulster Historical Foundation. Learn how to get the most out of Irish resources and records, gain strategies for breaking down brick walls, and understand important historical context. Whether you are just beginning your Irish research or have been at it for years, you won’t want to miss this full-day seminar! View a full agenda and register today!

March 10 - New Visitor Tour
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
10:00 AM–11:00 AM Cost: FREE

This free orientation and tour introduces you to the resources available at the NEHGS research facility. Founded in 1845, NEHGS is the country's oldest and largest nonprofit genealogy library and archive. With more than 15 million artifacts, books, manuscripts, microfilms, journals, photographs, and records—and expert staff to help you navigate it all—NEHGS provides the access you need to research your family history. You do not have to be a member to participate. Tour attendees are welcome to use our resources following the tour. No registration necessary.

March 10 - DNA in Genealogy: How Genetic Testing Can Enrich Your Family History
In partnership with the New England Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
1:00 PM–3:30 PM Cost: $25

Advances in DNA research over the last decades have had huge implications for the field of genealogy. Join NEHGS Genealogist Tom Dreyer and NEAPG Member Shellee Morehead to learn how genetic testing can enrich your family history. Tom Dreyer will present, “Genetics and Genealogy: How DNA Testing Can Enhance Traditional Research” and Shellee Morehead will discuss, “Using DNA to Solve a Mystery: Hamiltons in Colonial New England.” Attendees should already have a basic understanding of DNA tests available to family historians. Register here.

March 10 - WWI Centennial: Doughboy Roadshow
Sponsored by the Rhode Island World War One Centennial Commission
Aldrich House, 110 Benevolent Street, Providence, RI
9:00 AM–4:00 PM Cost: FREE

To help commemorate Rhode Island’s efforts during World War I, the Doughboy Roadshow will connect members of the public with historians, archivists, and genealogists to better understand familial and material connections to the Great War. Bring your World War I artifacts, documents, and militaria (excluding firearms) and receive help on identifying and preserving these important heirlooms. Meet with genealogists to learn how to research your veteran ancestors. Personnel from the Connecticut State Library will also be on hand to help participants digitize historically relevant items. NEHGS Archivist Judy Lucey and Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert will be in attendance. For more information, contact riww1cc@gmail.com. No registration necessary.

March 10 - Immigration and Naturalization: Tracing Your Immigrant Ancestors
Presented by Rhonda R. McClure, Senior Genealogist
New Hampshire Historical Society, 30 Park Street, Concord, NH 03301
1:00 - 4:00 PM Cost: $35 Members, $50 Non-members; registration is through NHHS

Since the seventeenth century, people have immigrated to America to escape religious or social persecution, claim a better life, or seek adventure. No matter the century, newcomers were expected to show allegiance to their new land. Over time, that expectation developed into the present-day naturalization process. Understanding the context of your ancestors’ arrival in the United States and the possible paper trail they left on the path to citizenship can lead to important genealogical discoveries. This workshop will guide attendees through three centuries (1620–1920) of immigration and naturalization in the United States and explain how these records can be used in family history research. The presentation will be given by Rhonda R. McClure of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Register today.

March 17 - Anti-Irish Sentiment in 19th-Century America
In partnership with The Irish Ancestral Research Association (TIARA)
Presentations by Peter Drummey of Massachusetts Historical Society and Eileen Pironti of New England Historic Genealogical Society
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
9:30 AM–12:00 PM Cost: $25

During the period of the Great Hunger in Ireland, between 1845 and 1852, approximately one million people died of starvation and illness, and an additional two million emigrated. Countless Irish immigrants sailed to American and Canadian ports in squalid conditions, simply hoping for a chance to survive. The mass influx of Irish refugees stretched the patience—and tolerance—of many Americans. Learn about the Nativist backlash and anti-Irish sentiment in Boston, across the state of Massachusetts, and throughout the country. Morning refreshments included. Register today.

March 21 - New Visitor Tour
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
10:00 AM–11:00 AM Cost: FREE

This free orientation and tour introduces you to the resources available at the NEHGS research facility. Founded in 1845, NEHGS is the country's oldest and largest nonprofit genealogy library and archive. With more than 15 million artifacts, books, manuscripts, microfilms, journals, photographs, and records—and expert staff to help you navigate it all—NEHGS provides the access you need to research your family history. You do not have to be a member to participate. Tour attendees are welcome to use our resources following the tour. No registration necessary.

March 29 - Chippendale: The Man and the Myth
Sponsored by the Nichols House Museum
Presented by Brock Jobe
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
6:00–7:30 PM Cost: $15 NHM Members; $20 NHM Nonmembers (register through Nichols House Museum)

This year marks the 300th anniversary of Britain’s most celebrated furniture maker, Thomas Chippendale. His designs reached both sides of the Atlantic through a groundbreaking pattern book, The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director of 1754. During his lifetime he oversaw one of the largest cabinetmaking and upholstery firms in London, and eventually his name defined an entire style of eighteenth-century furniture. Join Brock Jobe, Winterthur’s Professor Emeritus of American Decorative Arts, as he recounts the remarkable story of Chippendale’s career and takes us inside some of his greatest works. Along the way, we will confront the truth as well as the fiction associated with this fascinating character. Register through the Nichols House Museum.

Conferences

RootsTech 2018
February 28 - March 3, 2018
Salt Lake City, Utah
Booth #1125

Join NEHGS at the largest family history conference in the world! With over 200 breakout sessions, a fantastic lineup of keynote speakers, and an exhibit hall, there are countless learning opportunities for family historians of any level. Visit our booth in the exhibit hall to meet NEHGS staff and genealogists, receive special discounts on books and memberships, learn about our services and resources, and enter to win free consultation time with our genealogists. Be sure to attend Chief Genealogist David Allen Lambert's lectures, Understanding New England Probate Records on Friday, March 2 at 4:30 PM and Researching U.S. and Canadian World War I Ancestors on Saturday, March 3 at 3:00 PM. And don't miss Molly Rogers in the demo theater on Saturday, March 3 at 11:20 AM as she highlights all of the new activities and features at AmericanAncestors.org. We look forward to meeting you in Salt Lake City! To learn more about the conference and to register, visit rootstech.org.

Exhibits

January 17 - March 30, 2018
Dr. Saul Hertz and the Origin of Nuclear Medicine: Genealogy, Challenges, Legacy

In partnership with the Jewish Heritage Center at NEHGS
NEHGS, 99-101 Newbury Street, Boston
Cost: FREE

In the 1930s and 40s, Dr. Saul Hertz revolutionized medicine with his breakthrough research establishing the use of radioactive iodine (RAI) as the cornerstone of Nuclear Medicine. Used today, RAI is the Gold Standard of targeted cancer therapy. The son of Jewish immigrants, Hertz faced many professional challenges, especially anti-semitism, with his contributions being falsely recorded, omitted, and trivialized in medical history. More than eighty years since his research began in Boston at MGH and MIT, his story, achievements, and legacy are coming to light. Featuring research journals, vivid photographs, and correspondence as well as family heirloom, this exhibit examines the family’s origins in Poland, the social biases that impeded Hertz's due recognition, and how his medical legacy continues to this day.