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  • 2007 Archive

  • Vol. 9, No. 9
    Whole #311
    February 28, 2007
    Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    Contents:
    * New on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * New Books and Other Resources in NEHGS Library Catalog
    * Name Origins
    * Autographed Copies of Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries
    * NARA Raising Photocopy Rates
    * Research Recommendations: Genealogical Writing Tips: Numbers
    * Spotlight: The Chattahoochie Valley Regional Library System, Columbus Library, Columbus, Georgia
    * From the Online Genealogist
    * Stories of Interest
    * Upcoming Public Lecture Series
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information


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    New Databases on New EnglandAncestors.org

    Vital Records of the Town of Brewster to the end of the Year 1849
    http://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/vital_records/default.asp

    The vital records of Brewster were published by the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants in 1904. From the introduction to the book: "The Town of Brewster, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, was incorporated 19 February, 1803, and was named in honor of Elder William Brewster, a large part of the inhabitants being his descendants. The town was originally the northern part of the town of Harwich."

    The data from this book are being added to those in our existing Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 database. Images of the original pages from this book may be viewed from the search results page of that database.

    This database addition contains the records of 3,416 births, 1,566 marriage intentions, 630 marriages, and 915 deaths.

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    New Books and Other Resources in NEHGS Library Catalog

    NEHGS has posted the most recent list of new titles added to the library collections. To see if there is something relevant to your research on this December, 2006, to January, 2007, list, go directly to the New Books page at library.nehgs.org/ftlist. You can also access the list by going to the catalog’s main search page, library.nehgs.org, and clicking the “New Books” link beneath the search box. To view more details about any title on the list, simply click the title, which is hyperlinked (underlined), and you will be taken to the full catalog record. The list is sorted in call number order.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    THEODORE (m) – From the Greek for ‘gift of God,’ therefore related to DOROTHY.

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    Offer Extended - Get Autographed Copies of Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries

    The NEHGS Sales department is offering personally inscribed copies of the hugely popular work Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries by NEHGS Online Genealogist David Allen Lambert at the discounted price of $15.00!

    Now a researcher can quickly gain information on:

    • cemetery names
    • year of the consecration of the cemetery, or the oldest known gravestone or burial
    • location of the cemetery
    • printed and manuscript sources for the cemetery
    • contact information for the office affilliated with the cemetery

    This book contains many previously undocumented burial grounds as well as citations to published transcriptions of gravestone listings in places such as the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, and the official series of Massachusetts vital records to 1850. A must for those with ties to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts!

     

    To order, please call 1-617-226-1212. Prices good through March 4, 2007, while supplies last.

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    NARA Raising Photocopy Rates

    The National Archives and Records Administration is raising rates for photocopying records. The most drastic raise concerns Civil War Pension files. Researchers can currently order a complete Civil War pension file for thirty-seven dollars. Under the new pricing structure, it will now cost $125. NARA is welcoming commentary on the new pricing structure. You can read more and make your comments at http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20071800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2007/E7-3162.htm.

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    Research Recommendations

    Genealogical Writing Tips: Using Numbers
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Numbers can prove challenging in your writing. When do you use numerals and when do you spell them out? How do you indicate plurals? When do you use hyphens or commas? Your head can easily spin out of control. Following are some tips for using numbers in your writing.

    Numerals or Words?
    Whole numbers from one through one hundred should be spelled out. Numerals are usually used for all other numbers. Remember that twenty-one, twenty-two, etc. should always be hyphenated, even you are spelling out a larger number (e.g. one hundred forty-five). Numbers between one thousand and ten thousand that can be expressed in hundreds should be written out (e.g., seventeen hundred). In addition, if the whole numbers are following by hundred, thousand, etc., they should also be spelled out. Numbers between one thousand and ten thousand that can be expressed in hundreds should be written out (e.g., seventeen hundred). If spelled-out numbers occur too closely together, it may be necessary to use numerals (or a mix of both) to make the sentence more readable. This is especially true for streets whose names are numbers (e.g., use 85 Fifth Avenue instead of Eighty-five Fifth Avenue or 85 5th Avenue). These rules apply to both cardinal and ordinal numbers. (e.g. first, second, seventy-seventh, 153rd, 565th). Numerals are used for all percentages.

    Spell out numbers that start a sentence, regardless of whether they would ordinarily appear as a numeral (e.g., One hundred seventy-seven balloons were released to celebrate their anniversary). If a numeral must be used, the sentence should be restructured so that the number no longer starts the sentence (e.g., Their children celebrated their anniversary by releasing 177 balloons).

    Dates
    Unless they start a sentence or are part of a transcription, years should always appear as numerals. For genealogical writing, the first two numbers of a year should always be included to minimize confusion over the centuries. If years are expressed only as a decade, an apostrophe should be placed before the first number and an s should appear immediately after the zero (e.g., ’70s, ’80s, ’90s). Never use an apostrophe before the s. If the year is possessive all numbers in the date should be used (e.g., September 11 was 2001’s most memorable day).

    Centuries should be spelled out (e.g., nineteenth century, twentieth century). If the century is being used as an adjective, a hyphen should be used (e.g., nineteenth-century tools).

    Punctuation
    Never use an apostrophe for plural numerals (e.g., use 240s, not 240’s). Numbers of one thousand or more should contain commas every three digits, starting from the right. Commas can be used to set off Jr. and Sr. in a name, but they are not used for roman numerals, such as III, IV, V, etc. When using them to set off Jr. and Sr., make sure that a comma appears both before and after the title (e.g., John F. Kennedy, Jr., was the son of John Fitzgerald and Jacqueline (Bouvier) Kennedy).

    En dashes can be used for numbers that indicate a series, such as 131–45. Series can also be indicated with prepositions (e.g., from 131 to 145). You should never use a preposition when using en dashes.

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    Spotlight: The Chattahoochie Valley Regional Library System, Columbus Library, Columbus, Georgia
    http://www.thecolumbuslibrary.org/ResearchResources/genealogy/genealogydatabase.php
    by Valerie Beaudrault

    The Genealogy & Local History Department of the Columbus Library has made a number of online genealogy resources available to the general public. Columbus, Georgia, is located in Muscogee County, which is on the Georgia-Alabama border.

    The databases can be searched from the Genealogy Database Access main page. To begin your search enter a first, middle or last name in the Search Terms box and choose a database from the drop down list.

    Muscogee County Marriage Database 1845-1878
    Library staff members created this index from microfilmed copies of the original Muscogee County Marriage Records 1845-1878. The entries have been copied as they were written in the original record. If it was not possible to determine the spelling of a particular handwritten entry, a question mark was used to indicate that the name/spelling was uncertain. The search fields include the surname and first name of the bride and the surname and first name of the groom. Search results include the surname and first name of the bride and the surname, first name of the groom, date of recording, and page number and book identification.

    Lee County, Alabama Colored Marriage Database 1867-1875
    Lee County is located on the border with Georgia. It is named in honor of Robert E. Lee. This index was created from the original Lee County Marriage Records 1867-1875. Although indexes for these marriages exist, none included the pre-1900 colored marriages prior to the creation of this index. Again, The entries have been copied as they were written in the original record. If it was not possible to determine the spelling of a particular handwritten entry, a question mark was used to indicate that the name/spelling was uncertain. The search fields include the surname and first name of the bride and the surname and first name of the groom. Search results include the surname and first name of the bride and the surname, first name of the groom, date of recording, and page number and book identification.

    Harris County, Georgia Wills & Bonds Database, 1833-1849
    Harris County was created in 1827 from portions of Muscogee and Troup counties. It was named for Charles Harris, a lawyer who served as mayor of Savannah. This index was created from microfilmed copies of the original Harris County Wills 1833-1849. Search fields include surname and first name. The fields in the search results include surname, first name, an indication as to whether the individual died testate or intestate, year, and page number.

    Columbus Ledger-Enquirer Obituary Database 1998-2005
    Library staff created this database. It includes every obituary printed in the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer from January, 1998, to December, 2005. The database can be searched by first name, middle name, nickname, last name, and maiden name. Search results include full name, nickname, maiden name, and the date on which the obituary appeared in the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer.

    Muscogee County Birth Register Database, 1890-1900
    All extant birth recrds for Muscogee County, Georgia, for the period from 1890 to 1900 were abstracted by genealogist Dan Olds to create this index. The database can be searched by parents’ name and child’s name. This database contains abstracts of the parents name, child’s name, if recorded, sex of the child, race of the child, date of birth, book and page number, and additional notes, if provided.

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    Stories of Interest

    Genealogists know the value of cemeteries and the pleasure of being in one. Town officials in Pacific, Missouri were recently presented with an unusual request - a couple wants permission to wed in a local graveyard. Read the story at http://www.boston.com/news/odd/articles/2007/02/19/couple_plan_to_tie_the_knot_in_graveyard/.

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    From the Online Genealogist

    Question:
    I am new to genealogy and hope you can help me. My late mother long remembered that there was a family bible. Can you help me find out where bibles are collected, or how it may have been registered somewhere?

    Answer:
    Sadly there is no one repository for family bibles. Many organizations have collected family bible records over the years, including NEHGS. You can search our manuscript holdings to see if there is a bible record of interest.

    It is possible your bible was transcribed and published. You should check publications such as The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, published since 1847. Bible Records from the manuscript collections of the New England Historic Genealogical Society was published as a CD-ROM in 2001. You might also wish to contact other family members, and distant cousins to see who may have owned the bible last.

     

    David Allen Lambert is the Society’s Online Genealogist. If you would like to ask him a question, contact him at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org or visit his blog at http://www.davidlambertblog.com/. For more information about the Online Genealogist visit www.newenglandancestors.org/research/main/online_genealogist.asp. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first-come, first-served basis.

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    Upcoming Public Lecture Series

    Our lectures explore a wide range of research skills and sources and are free and open to the public. They are offered in the Richardson-Sloane Education Center at 101 Newbury Street on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10:00 A.M. unless otherwise stated. Advance registration is not necessary.

    March 3
    Marie Daly, New Visitor Welcome and Library Tour
    New visitors will be welcomed, given a chance to introduce themselves, meet other new visitors, describe their research and have knowledgeable staff advise them on how to proceed. The thirty-minute welcome will be followed by a tour of the library.

    March 7
    Joshua Taylor, Creating Your Personal Genealogical Website
    In today's world of online technology, having your own personal genealogical website can greatly benefit your genealogical work. Please join Joshua Taylor, NEHGS Research Services Coordinator, as he presents a variety of methods and processes that will ensure the success of your website. Watch as a simple website is created and uploaded to the Internet. Other topics covered include copyright, privacy statements, blogs, site maps, and search engines.

    Rescheduled Lecture
    Many people were unable to attend Davis Dearborn’s lecture, A Cornucopia of Records: Researching Essex County [MA] Ancestors due to a snowstorm on February 14. By popular request, David will be presenting his lecture again on Wednesday, May 23, at 10:00 AM.


    Future programs for the first quarter of 2007 include:
    March 14, David Lambert, Getting the Most from NEHGS Databases
    March 17 (Saturday at 10:00 am), Shelley Barber and Marie Daly, Researching Immigrant Documents: The Prendergast Letters
    March 21, Martin Hollick, New Englanders in the 1600s
    March 28, Rhonda McClure, Using Your Computer for Genealogical Analysis

     

    For more information about lectures offered by New England Historic Genealogical Society, please go to the Education homepage at www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main or call 1-888-286-3447.

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a large number of lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists. The following major programs will be held March-November 2007:

    Writing Your Family History: Organizing Your Material and Getting Started
    Saturday, March 31, 2007 (Seminar in Boston)
    It is a constant refrain: genealogists love the ancestral search but often find the distillation of their hard work unappealing -- and so they end up missing out on what can be the enjoyable experience of writing up their results. Join expert NEHGS consultants for a one-day seminar addressing how to organize your material, plan what to write based on that newly-organized material, and then how to "build" your family history step by step. Henry B. Hoff, editor of The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, will speak on the progression from research notes to a written draft, and on what decisions must be made before starting to write. Rhonda R. McClure, NEHGS genealogist, will speak on organizing both paper and computer files. Helen Schatvet Ullmann, associate editor of the Register, will show how to use Microsoft Word to compose a family history, step by step.
    Registration fee: $95

    For more information, or to register, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/pdf/WritingSeminar2007.pdf.

    Genetics and Genealogy Saturday, April 21, 2007
    Seminar in Boston

    Research Day at NARA Northeast Region Wednesday, May 16, 2007
    Location: Waltham, MA

    Come Home to New England #1 Monday, June 18–Saturday, June 23, 2007
    Tutorial program with consultations in Boston

    Come Home to New England #2 Monday, August 6–Saturday, August 11, 2007
    Tutorial program with consultations in Boston

    English Family History Research Tour to London Sunday, September 9–Sunday, September 16, 2007
    Lodging: Holiday Inn Bloomsbury

    Research Tour to Salt Lake City Sunday, October 28–Sunday, November 4, 2007
    Lodging: Salt Lake Plaza Hotel

    For more information about NEHGS programs visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/ or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

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    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_main.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

    Copyright 2007, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

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Boston, Massachusetts 02116, USA
888-296-3447

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