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  • 2007 Archive

  • Vol. 9, No. 45
    Whole #347
    November 7, 2007

    Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    Contents:
    * New on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter
    * Give the Gift of Research
    * Name Origins
    * From the Sales Department
    * Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    * Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    * Stories of Interest
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information


    **********************************

    New Databases on New EnglandAncestors.org

    The Essex Antiquarian – Volume 9 (1905)
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/essex_antiquarian/

    This week, we are releasing the ninth volume of The Essex Antiquarian, "An illustrated ... magazine devoted to the biography, genealogy, history, and antiquities of Essex County, Massachusetts," which was edited and published by Sidney Perley between 1897 and 1909. The journal was published monthly from January 1897 to June 1901, and then quarterly from July 1901 to October 1909. Each yearly volume contains 200-220 pages consisting of genealogical articles and a variety of photographs, maps, illustrations, and gravestone inscriptions, all pertaining to Essex County.  The thirteen original volumes of The Essex Antiquarian are available in our Research Library, call number F72/E7/E74 1897-1909.

    Woodbury, Connecticut Deaths 1678-1898
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/woodbury_deaths/default.asp

    This database presents the record of 4,725 deaths in Woodbury Connecticut, as compiled by Leon M .Barnes in Barnes’ Mortality Record of the Town of Woodbury, from the Settlement of the town of Woodbury in 1672, to the Present Day, published in 1898. Images of the original book pages may be viewed from the search results page. This volume is also available in our Boston research library, call number CT WOO 15.

    Enhancements to the Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 database
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/vital_records/default.asp

    Our ongoing project to add page images and corrections to our ‘Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850’ database continues this week. 

    This week, we are re-releasing the enhanced and corrected vital records of Andover, Framingham, Gloucester, Malden, Marlborough, Rochester, and Taunton.  We will continue to release enhanced records on a town-by-town basis as our volunteer team completes the work.  When searching records of these towns, you’ll find an ‘image’ link on the search results page that will display the image of the original VR page.

    Also, be sure to try the “Browse” feature for the VR page images that is accessed via the “Browse” button on the Mass. Vital Records to 1850 page. Page images may be browsed by selecting a town and record type, and optionally entering a surname or page number. For instance, to browse for births for the surname “Smith” in the Arlington vital records, select ‘Arlington’, ‘Birth’, and type ‘smith’ in the ‘Last name or Page #’ field. Click the ‘Go’ button and you’ll see the first page of ‘Smith’ births. The ‘Previous page’ and ‘Next page’ buttons will move one page at a time, and the ‘First page’ and ‘Last page’ buttons will jump to the beginning or end of the current record type.

    Return to Table of Contents

    ********************************

    Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter

    The Great Migration Newsletter offers feature articles on a variety of topics, including the settlement of early New England towns, migration patterns, seventeenth-century passenger lists, church and land records, and much more. The Newsletter complements the individual Great Migration sketches and addresses broad issues key to understanding the lives and times of New England’s first immigrants.
    Print subscribers to volume 17 (2008) receive a new issue of the Newsletter through the mail each quarter. ($20 per year)

    Online subscribers access issues through http://www.greatmigration.org/, where the Newsletter is posted each quarter. They can also access past issues from volumes 11 through 16, as well as bonus biographical sketches not yet in print. ($10 per year for NEHGS members; $20 per year for non-members)

    To subscribe, please visit http://www.greatmigration.org/ or call Member Services at 1-888-286-3447.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Give the Gift of Research

    Whether your family and friends are just starting out in genealogy, preparing for application to lineage societies, or attempting to break through brick walls, our Research Services department is here to help. Our experts include professional genealogists, librarians, and historians who together form an unparalleled team.

    This holiday season, give your friends and family a certificate good towards research by the experts at NEHGS. Certificates are available in a variety of quantities and can be ordered by calling 617-226-1233. Recipients will be mailed a gift certificate, welcome letter, and instructions.

    For more information visit www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/research/services/research_our_services.asp, call 617-226-1233, or email research@nehgs.org.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    Sound shifts to watch out for:
    Initial vowel to N: ANN to NANCY, EDWARD to NED.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    From the Sales Department

    The Great Migration
    Did you get your Great Migration volumes while they were on sale? If not, the NEHGS Sales department is extending these sale prices through Sunday, November 11, 2007!

    The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume V: M-P : Normally priced at $59.95, we are offering a special sale price of $54.95.

    In addition, NEHGS is offering special discounted prices on all previous volumes of The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635 (normally priced at $59.95, now priced at $49.95).

    Pre-publication orders will also be taken for The Complete Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 1-15 ($24.95) and for The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 11-15 ($11.95). These titles are due out in November 2007.

    More information on these new volumes can be found at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/store. Orders can also be made at our website or by calling 1-617-226-1212. Prices do not include shipping.

    Last chance for these savings! Order today.


    Classic Reprints Catalog Sale
    Did you know that NEHGS offers a catalog of classic reprints of more than 10,000 hard-to-find or out-of-print books? The NEHGS Special Orders Catalog includes high-quality reprints of books that have long been out of print or are hard-to-find. All special order books are printed on acid-free paper in hardback bindings and many are available in soft cover. Find your family in our massive new catalog! We are so sure you will love this catalog that with its purchase you will receive a coupon towards $10 off your first order from it!

    Special Sale Price until December 1, 2007: $9.00 + shipping. To order the catalog visit www.newenglandancestors.org/store/browse/product.asp?sku=260699734

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Boston journalist Lorie Conway was been working for a decade to uncover the history of one of the largest public health initiatives in American history. The fruits of her efforts are an hour-long film and accompanying book — Forgotten Ellis Island: The Extraordinary Story of America’s Immigrant Hospital.

    Conway’s research took her across America. She researched archives and repositories looking for records and information on the hospital and its work. Unfortunately, few of the hospital’s records have survived. In fact only one — that of Australian Ormond McDermott — appears to have survived in its entirety. Many of the records are believed to have been destroyed during the renovation of the Great Hall at Ellis Island during the 1990s.

    With the assistance of genealogists and others, Conway traced down surviving patients and their families. She interviewed them to record the memories of their experiences (and those of their loved ones) as they went through the hospital.

    The story brings up the racial and ethnic prejudices that were part of the Eugenics movement in the early-twentieth century. Images were found of those judged to be feebleminded or otherwise deficient, based solely on facial expressions or the appearance and dimensions of body parts.

    Conway and her team were given unprecendented access to film the buildings of the hospital complex. Fortunately for her, most of the filming was done prior to 9/11. She has since been told that such access would not be given today under current security conditions.

    Forgotten Ellis Island was premiered last week at Ellis Island. The film has been submitted to PBS, which will hopefully air this important work. The accompanying book is 208 pages filled with many never-before-published photographs, as well as stories from the patients and staff of the hospital. It is available from Amazon.com.

    In addition to the book and film Conway, has developed a website,http://www.forgottenellisisland.com/, where you can find a virtual tour of the complex, images and video clips of the buildings, and excerpts from patients’ stories.

    Conway’s film points to the remarkable success of the complex from a public health standpoint. Less than 1 percent of immigrants were deported for contagious diseases, and no major epidemic was ever traced to an immigrant who entered the country after being treated at the hospital.

    Sewell Chan, reporter for The New York Times, published Conway’s story last week, which you can read in their online City Room. On Thursday, December 6, 2007, Lori Conway will be at the Boston Public Library to screen the film. She will also autograph copies of her book, which will be for sale at the event as well.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    by Valerie Beaudrault

    Canadian Health Obituaries Index File
    www.health.library.mcgill.ca/osler/cfstand/chobit.htm

    The Osler Library at McGill University has an online an index of Canadian medical obituaries and death notices. This index can be searched by the following: last name, first name, title/volume number, and year of publication. The database contains listings for obituaries and notices of death, which appeared in more than twenty-five different medical journals published between 1852 and 2000. The data fields in the search results include last name; first name; title of publication; publication date; volume and page number; and birth and death dates, if known.

    Obituaries From Halifax Papers 1930 to 1967 Cape Breton Counties Genweb, Nova Scotia www.rootsweb.com/~nscpbret/obitindx.html

    The Cape Breton Counties Genweb site has placed 25 obituaries transcribed from a small collection of Halifax newspapers. The newspapers date from 1930 – 1967. They are from the following counties: Cape Breton, Inverness, Richmond, and Victoria. These obituaries are filled with valuable information for anyone related to the deceased.

    Index to Digby Obituaries, Digby County, Nova Scotia Genweb
    www.rootsweb.com/~nsdigby/obituaries/qryindex.htm

    This database indexes obituaries found in Digby County newspapers during the period from April 1851 through 2005. The largest number of obituaries is for the late 1880s. The obituary database is arranged alphabetically. Click on the first letter of the last name to access the list.

    Each summary record begins with the year in which the death occurred followed by the full name of the deceased. It is followed by the date on which the obituary appeared, a list of surnames found in the obituary, and the name of the newspaper in which it appeared, as well as the name of the person who submitted the obituary. Click on the ‘Obituary’ link to view a transcription of the obituary. There is a separate alphabetical index to other surnames found in each obituary. This is very useful for determining the relationships among families. Individuals with family that emigrated from Digby County, Nova Scotia, should take a look at these obituaries. I looked at a few obituaries from the 1910s through early 1930s and found that the deceased individuals had relatives living in places such as East Boston, Winthrop, Longmeadow, Salem, and Somerville, Massachusetts; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Concord and Plymouth, New Hampshire; Hartland and Windsor, Vermont; Weathersfield, Connecticut, and Reading, Pennsylvania.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Stories of Interest

    Advances in Genetic Genealogy Announced
    FamilyTree DNA recently announced new avenues for DNA research at its 4th Inernational Conference on Genetic Genealogy in Houston. Get more details at home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20071101005229&newsLang=en.

    Rhode Island Cemeteries
    Providence Journal
    staff writer Donita Naylor published a scary Halloween story — one focusing on the historical cemeteries in Rhode Island that are being lost to neglect. On the more pleasant side, Naylor interviewed individuals who are working to preserve these “open air musems.” You can read the full story at www.projo.com/news/content/HISTORICAL_CEMETERIES_10-31-07_6G7J55L_v40.33deed6.html.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a number of dynamic lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists and the general public. Programs are held at 101 Newbury Street unless otherwise indicated.

    The following programs will be held November 2007:

    Dwelling Place of Dragons
    Saturday, November 10, 2007, 10 a.m.
    Author Marjorie Harshaw Robie, seen on The Today Show and PBS, will present a three-part discussion of her new book Dwelling Place of Dragons, a fascinating look at the dangers of religious tyranny in Ireland between 1830 and 1849.

    Getting the Most from NEHGS Databases
    Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 10 a.m.
    With over 110 million names in 2,200 databases, NewEnglandAncestors.org is the primary internet resource for New England genealogy. This free lecture will offer an overview of the Society’s website and online databases.

     

    For more information about NEHGS programs, visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/ or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_homepage.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

    Copyright 2007, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Return to Table of ContentsEdited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    Contents:
    * New on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter
    * Give the Gift of Research
    * Name Origins
    * From the Sales Department
    * Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    * Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    * Stories of Interest
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information


    **********************************

    New Databases on New EnglandAncestors.org

    The Essex Antiquarian – Volume 9 (1905)
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/essex_antiquarian/

    This week, we are releasing the ninth volume of The Essex Antiquarian, "An illustrated ... magazine devoted to the biography, genealogy, history, and antiquities of Essex County, Massachusetts," which was edited and published by Sidney Perley between 1897 and 1909. The journal was published monthly from January 1897 to June 1901, and then quarterly from July 1901 to October 1909. Each yearly volume contains 200-220 pages consisting of genealogical articles and a variety of photographs, maps, illustrations, and gravestone inscriptions, all pertaining to Essex County.  The thirteen original volumes of The Essex Antiquarian are available in our Research Library, call number F72/E7/E74 1897-1909.

    Woodbury, Connecticut Deaths 1678-1898
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/woodbury_deaths/default.asp

    This database presents the record of 4,725 deaths in Woodbury Connecticut, as compiled by Leon M .Barnes in Barnes’ Mortality Record of the Town of Woodbury, from the Settlement of the town of Woodbury in 1672, to the Present Day, published in 1898. Images of the original book pages may be viewed from the search results page. This volume is also available in our Boston research library, call number CT WOO 15.

    Enhancements to the Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 database
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/vital_records/default.asp

    Our ongoing project to add page images and corrections to our ‘Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850’ database continues this week. 

    This week, we are re-releasing the enhanced and corrected vital records of Andover, Framingham, Gloucester, Malden, Marlborough, Rochester, and Taunton.  We will continue to release enhanced records on a town-by-town basis as our volunteer team completes the work.  When searching records of these towns, you’ll find an ‘image’ link on the search results page that will display the image of the original VR page.

    Also, be sure to try the “Browse” feature for the VR page images that is accessed via the “Browse” button on the Mass. Vital Records to 1850 page. Page images may be browsed by selecting a town and record type, and optionally entering a surname or page number. For instance, to browse for births for the surname “Smith” in the Arlington vital records, select ‘Arlington’, ‘Birth’, and type ‘smith’ in the ‘Last name or Page #’ field. Click the ‘Go’ button and you’ll see the first page of ‘Smith’ births. The ‘Previous page’ and ‘Next page’ buttons will move one page at a time, and the ‘First page’ and ‘Last page’ buttons will jump to the beginning or end of the current record type.

    Return to Table of Contents

    ********************************

    Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter

    The Great Migration Newsletter offers feature articles on a variety of topics, including the settlement of early New England towns, migration patterns, seventeenth-century passenger lists, church and land records, and much more. The Newsletter complements the individual Great Migration sketches and addresses broad issues key to understanding the lives and times of New England’s first immigrants.
    Print subscribers to volume 17 (2008) receive a new issue of the Newsletter through the mail each quarter. ($20 per year)

    Online subscribers access issues through http://www.greatmigration.org/, where the Newsletter is posted each quarter. They can also access past issues from volumes 11 through 16, as well as bonus biographical sketches not yet in print. ($10 per year for NEHGS members; $20 per year for non-members)

    To subscribe, please visit http://www.greatmigration.org/ or call Member Services at 1-888-286-3447.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Give the Gift of Research

    Whether your family and friends are just starting out in genealogy, preparing for application to lineage societies, or attempting to break through brick walls, our Research Services department is here to help. Our experts include professional genealogists, librarians, and historians who together form an unparalleled team.

    This holiday season, give your friends and family a certificate good towards research by the experts at NEHGS. Certificates are available in a variety of quantities and can be ordered by calling 617-226-1233. Recipients will be mailed a gift certificate, welcome letter, and instructions.

    For more information visit www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/research/services/research_our_services.asp, call 617-226-1233, or email research@nehgs.org.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    Sound shifts to watch out for:
    Initial vowel to N: ANN to NANCY, EDWARD to NED.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    From the Sales Department

    The Great Migration
    Did you get your Great Migration volumes while they were on sale? If not, the NEHGS Sales department is extending these sale prices through Sunday, November 11, 2007!

    The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume V: M-P : Normally priced at $59.95, we are offering a special sale price of $54.95.

    In addition, NEHGS is offering special discounted prices on all previous volumes of The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635 (normally priced at $59.95, now priced at $49.95).

    Pre-publication orders will also be taken for The Complete Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 1-15 ($24.95) and for The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 11-15 ($11.95). These titles are due out in November 2007.

    More information on these new volumes can be found at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/store. Orders can also be made at our website or by calling 1-617-226-1212. Prices do not include shipping.

    Last chance for these savings! Order today.


    Classic Reprints Catalog Sale
    Did you know that NEHGS offers a catalog of classic reprints of more than 10,000 hard-to-find or out-of-print books? The NEHGS Special Orders Catalog includes high-quality reprints of books that have long been out of print or are hard-to-find. All special order books are printed on acid-free paper in hardback bindings and many are available in soft cover. Find your family in our massive new catalog! We are so sure you will love this catalog that with its purchase you will receive a coupon towards $10 off your first order from it!

    Special Sale Price until December 1, 2007: $9.00 + shipping. To order the catalog visit www.newenglandancestors.org/store/browse/product.asp?sku=260699734

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Boston journalist Lorie Conway was been working for a decade to uncover the history of one of the largest public health initiatives in American history. The fruits of her efforts are an hour-long film and accompanying book — Forgotten Ellis Island: The Extraordinary Story of America’s Immigrant Hospital.

    Conway’s research took her across America. She researched archives and repositories looking for records and information on the hospital and its work. Unfortunately, few of the hospital’s records have survived. In fact only one — that of Australian Ormond McDermott — appears to have survived in its entirety. Many of the records are believed to have been destroyed during the renovation of the Great Hall at Ellis Island during the 1990s.

    With the assistance of genealogists and others, Conway traced down surviving patients and their families. She interviewed them to record the memories of their experiences (and those of their loved ones) as they went through the hospital.

    The story brings up the racial and ethnic prejudices that were part of the Eugenics movement in the early-twentieth century. Images were found of those judged to be feebleminded or otherwise deficient, based solely on facial expressions or the appearance and dimensions of body parts.

    Conway and her team were given unprecendented access to film the buildings of the hospital complex. Fortunately for her, most of the filming was done prior to 9/11. She has since been told that such access would not be given today under current security conditions.

    Forgotten Ellis Island was premiered last week at Ellis Island. The film has been submitted to PBS, which will hopefully air this important work. The accompanying book is 208 pages filled with many never-before-published photographs, as well as stories from the patients and staff of the hospital. It is available from Amazon.com.

    In addition to the book and film Conway, has developed a website,http://www.forgottenellisisland.com/, where you can find a virtual tour of the complex, images and video clips of the buildings, and excerpts from patients’ stories.

    Conway’s film points to the remarkable success of the complex from a public health standpoint. Less than 1 percent of immigrants were deported for contagious diseases, and no major epidemic was ever traced to an immigrant who entered the country after being treated at the hospital.

    Sewell Chan, reporter for The New York Times, published Conway’s story last week, which you can read in their online City Room. On Thursday, December 6, 2007, Lori Conway will be at the Boston Public Library to screen the film. She will also autograph copies of her book, which will be for sale at the event as well.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    by Valerie Beaudrault

    Canadian Health Obituaries Index File
    www.health.library.mcgill.ca/osler/cfstand/chobit.htm

    The Osler Library at McGill University has an online an index of Canadian medical obituaries and death notices. This index can be searched by the following: last name, first name, title/volume number, and year of publication. The database contains listings for obituaries and notices of death, which appeared in more than twenty-five different medical journals published between 1852 and 2000. The data fields in the search results include last name; first name; title of publication; publication date; volume and page number; and birth and death dates, if known.

    Obituaries From Halifax Papers 1930 to 1967 Cape Breton Counties Genweb, Nova Scotia www.rootsweb.com/~nscpbret/obitindx.html

    The Cape Breton Counties Genweb site has placed 25 obituaries transcribed from a small collection of Halifax newspapers. The newspapers date from 1930 – 1967. They are from the following counties: Cape Breton, Inverness, Richmond, and Victoria. These obituaries are filled with valuable information for anyone related to the deceased.

    Index to Digby Obituaries, Digby County, Nova Scotia Genweb
    www.rootsweb.com/~nsdigby/obituaries/qryindex.htm

    This database indexes obituaries found in Digby County newspapers during the period from April 1851 through 2005. The largest number of obituaries is for the late 1880s. The obituary database is arranged alphabetically. Click on the first letter of the last name to access the list.

    Each summary record begins with the year in which the death occurred followed by the full name of the deceased. It is followed by the date on which the obituary appeared, a list of surnames found in the obituary, and the name of the newspaper in which it appeared, as well as the name of the person who submitted the obituary. Click on the ‘Obituary’ link to view a transcription of the obituary. There is a separate alphabetical index to other surnames found in each obituary. This is very useful for determining the relationships among families. Individuals with family that emigrated from Digby County, Nova Scotia, should take a look at these obituaries. I looked at a few obituaries from the 1910s through early 1930s and found that the deceased individuals had relatives living in places such as East Boston, Winthrop, Longmeadow, Salem, and Somerville, Massachusetts; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Concord and Plymouth, New Hampshire; Hartland and Windsor, Vermont; Weathersfield, Connecticut, and Reading, Pennsylvania.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Stories of Interest

    Advances in Genetic Genealogy Announced
    FamilyTree DNA recently announced new avenues for DNA research at its 4th Inernational Conference on Genetic Genealogy in Houston. Get more details at home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20071101005229&newsLang=en.

    Rhode Island Cemeteries
    Providence Journal
    staff writer Donita Naylor published a scary Halloween story — one focusing on the historical cemeteries in Rhode Island that are being lost to neglect. On the more pleasant side, Naylor interviewed individuals who are working to preserve these “open air musems.” You can read the full story at www.projo.com/news/content/HISTORICAL_CEMETERIES_10-31-07_6G7J55L_v40.33deed6.html.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a number of dynamic lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists and the general public. Programs are held at 101 Newbury Street unless otherwise indicated.

    The following programs will be held November 2007:

    Dwelling Place of Dragons
    Saturday, November 10, 2007, 10 a.m.
    Author Marjorie Harshaw Robie, seen on The Today Show and PBS, will present a three-part discussion of her new book Dwelling Place of Dragons, a fascinating look at the dangers of religious tyranny in Ireland between 1830 and 1849.

    Getting the Most from NEHGS Databases
    Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 10 a.m.
    With over 110 million names in 2,200 databases, NewEnglandAncestors.org is the primary internet resource for New England genealogy. This free lecture will offer an overview of the Society’s website and online databases.

     

    For more information about NEHGS programs, visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/ or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_homepage.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

    Copyright 2007, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Return to Table of ContentsEdited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    Contents:
    * New on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter
    * Give the Gift of Research
    * Name Origins
    * From the Sales Department
    * Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    * Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    * Stories of Interest
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information


    **********************************

    New Databases on New EnglandAncestors.org

    The Essex Antiquarian – Volume 9 (1905)
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/essex_antiquarian/

    This week, we are releasing the ninth volume of The Essex Antiquarian, "An illustrated ... magazine devoted to the biography, genealogy, history, and antiquities of Essex County, Massachusetts," which was edited and published by Sidney Perley between 1897 and 1909. The journal was published monthly from January 1897 to June 1901, and then quarterly from July 1901 to October 1909. Each yearly volume contains 200-220 pages consisting of genealogical articles and a variety of photographs, maps, illustrations, and gravestone inscriptions, all pertaining to Essex County.  The thirteen original volumes of The Essex Antiquarian are available in our Research Library, call number F72/E7/E74 1897-1909.

    Woodbury, Connecticut Deaths 1678-1898
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/woodbury_deaths/default.asp

    This database presents the record of 4,725 deaths in Woodbury Connecticut, as compiled by Leon M .Barnes in Barnes’ Mortality Record of the Town of Woodbury, from the Settlement of the town of Woodbury in 1672, to the Present Day, published in 1898. Images of the original book pages may be viewed from the search results page. This volume is also available in our Boston research library, call number CT WOO 15.

    Enhancements to the Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850 database
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/vital_records/default.asp

    Our ongoing project to add page images and corrections to our ‘Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850’ database continues this week. 

    This week, we are re-releasing the enhanced and corrected vital records of Andover, Framingham, Gloucester, Malden, Marlborough, Rochester, and Taunton.  We will continue to release enhanced records on a town-by-town basis as our volunteer team completes the work.  When searching records of these towns, you’ll find an ‘image’ link on the search results page that will display the image of the original VR page.

    Also, be sure to try the “Browse” feature for the VR page images that is accessed via the “Browse” button on the Mass. Vital Records to 1850 page. Page images may be browsed by selecting a town and record type, and optionally entering a surname or page number. For instance, to browse for births for the surname “Smith” in the Arlington vital records, select ‘Arlington’, ‘Birth’, and type ‘smith’ in the ‘Last name or Page #’ field. Click the ‘Go’ button and you’ll see the first page of ‘Smith’ births. The ‘Previous page’ and ‘Next page’ buttons will move one page at a time, and the ‘First page’ and ‘Last page’ buttons will jump to the beginning or end of the current record type.

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    Subscribe now for the 2008 Great Migration Newsletter

    The Great Migration Newsletter offers feature articles on a variety of topics, including the settlement of early New England towns, migration patterns, seventeenth-century passenger lists, church and land records, and much more. The Newsletter complements the individual Great Migration sketches and addresses broad issues key to understanding the lives and times of New England’s first immigrants.
    Print subscribers to volume 17 (2008) receive a new issue of the Newsletter through the mail each quarter. ($20 per year)

    Online subscribers access issues through http://www.greatmigration.org/, where the Newsletter is posted each quarter. They can also access past issues from volumes 11 through 16, as well as bonus biographical sketches not yet in print. ($10 per year for NEHGS members; $20 per year for non-members)

    To subscribe, please visit http://www.greatmigration.org/ or call Member Services at 1-888-286-3447.

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    Give the Gift of Research

    Whether your family and friends are just starting out in genealogy, preparing for application to lineage societies, or attempting to break through brick walls, our Research Services department is here to help. Our experts include professional genealogists, librarians, and historians who together form an unparalleled team.

    This holiday season, give your friends and family a certificate good towards research by the experts at NEHGS. Certificates are available in a variety of quantities and can be ordered by calling 617-226-1233. Recipients will be mailed a gift certificate, welcome letter, and instructions.

    For more information visit www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/research/services/research_our_services.asp, call 617-226-1233, or email research@nehgs.org.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    Sound shifts to watch out for:
    Initial vowel to N: ANN to NANCY, EDWARD to NED.

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    From the Sales Department

    The Great Migration
    Did you get your Great Migration volumes while they were on sale? If not, the NEHGS Sales department is extending these sale prices through Sunday, November 11, 2007!

    The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume V: M-P : Normally priced at $59.95, we are offering a special sale price of $54.95.

    In addition, NEHGS is offering special discounted prices on all previous volumes of The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635 (normally priced at $59.95, now priced at $49.95).

    Pre-publication orders will also be taken for The Complete Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 1-15 ($24.95) and for The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 11-15 ($11.95). These titles are due out in November 2007.

    More information on these new volumes can be found at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/store. Orders can also be made at our website or by calling 1-617-226-1212. Prices do not include shipping.

    Last chance for these savings! Order today.


    Classic Reprints Catalog Sale
    Did you know that NEHGS offers a catalog of classic reprints of more than 10,000 hard-to-find or out-of-print books? The NEHGS Special Orders Catalog includes high-quality reprints of books that have long been out of print or are hard-to-find. All special order books are printed on acid-free paper in hardback bindings and many are available in soft cover. Find your family in our massive new catalog! We are so sure you will love this catalog that with its purchase you will receive a coupon towards $10 off your first order from it!

    Special Sale Price until December 1, 2007: $9.00 + shipping. To order the catalog visit www.newenglandancestors.org/store/browse/product.asp?sku=260699734

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    Research Recommendations: Forgotten Ellis Island
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Boston journalist Lorie Conway was been working for a decade to uncover the history of one of the largest public health initiatives in American history. The fruits of her efforts are an hour-long film and accompanying book — Forgotten Ellis Island: The Extraordinary Story of America’s Immigrant Hospital.

    Conway’s research took her across America. She researched archives and repositories looking for records and information on the hospital and its work. Unfortunately, few of the hospital’s records have survived. In fact only one — that of Australian Ormond McDermott — appears to have survived in its entirety. Many of the records are believed to have been destroyed during the renovation of the Great Hall at Ellis Island during the 1990s.

    With the assistance of genealogists and others, Conway traced down surviving patients and their families. She interviewed them to record the memories of their experiences (and those of their loved ones) as they went through the hospital.

    The story brings up the racial and ethnic prejudices that were part of the Eugenics movement in the early-twentieth century. Images were found of those judged to be feebleminded or otherwise deficient, based solely on facial expressions or the appearance and dimensions of body parts.

    Conway and her team were given unprecendented access to film the buildings of the hospital complex. Fortunately for her, most of the filming was done prior to 9/11. She has since been told that such access would not be given today under current security conditions.

    Forgotten Ellis Island was premiered last week at Ellis Island. The film has been submitted to PBS, which will hopefully air this important work. The accompanying book is 208 pages filled with many never-before-published photographs, as well as stories from the patients and staff of the hospital. It is available from Amazon.com.

    In addition to the book and film Conway, has developed a website,http://www.forgottenellisisland.com/, where you can find a virtual tour of the complex, images and video clips of the buildings, and excerpts from patients’ stories.

    Conway’s film points to the remarkable success of the complex from a public health standpoint. Less than 1 percent of immigrants were deported for contagious diseases, and no major epidemic was ever traced to an immigrant who entered the country after being treated at the hospital.

    Sewell Chan, reporter for The New York Times, published Conway’s story last week, which you can read in their online City Room. On Thursday, December 6, 2007, Lori Conway will be at the Boston Public Library to screen the film. She will also autograph copies of her book, which will be for sale at the event as well.

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    Spotlight: Canadian Obituary Databases
    by Valerie Beaudrault

    Canadian Health Obituaries Index File
    www.health.library.mcgill.ca/osler/cfstand/chobit.htm

    The Osler Library at McGill University has an online an index of Canadian medical obituaries and death notices. This index can be searched by the following: last name, first name, title/volume number, and year of publication. The database contains listings for obituaries and notices of death, which appeared in more than twenty-five different medical journals published between 1852 and 2000. The data fields in the search results include last name; first name; title of publication; publication date; volume and page number; and birth and death dates, if known.

    Obituaries From Halifax Papers 1930 to 1967 Cape Breton Counties Genweb, Nova Scotia www.rootsweb.com/~nscpbret/obitindx.html

    The Cape Breton Counties Genweb site has placed 25 obituaries transcribed from a small collection of Halifax newspapers. The newspapers date from 1930 – 1967. They are from the following counties: Cape Breton, Inverness, Richmond, and Victoria. These obituaries are filled with valuable information for anyone related to the deceased.

    Index to Digby Obituaries, Digby County, Nova Scotia Genweb
    www.rootsweb.com/~nsdigby/obituaries/qryindex.htm

    This database indexes obituaries found in Digby County newspapers during the period from April 1851 through 2005. The largest number of obituaries is for the late 1880s. The obituary database is arranged alphabetically. Click on the first letter of the last name to access the list.

    Each summary record begins with the year in which the death occurred followed by the full name of the deceased. It is followed by the date on which the obituary appeared, a list of surnames found in the obituary, and the name of the newspaper in which it appeared, as well as the name of the person who submitted the obituary. Click on the ‘Obituary’ link to view a transcription of the obituary. There is a separate alphabetical index to other surnames found in each obituary. This is very useful for determining the relationships among families. Individuals with family that emigrated from Digby County, Nova Scotia, should take a look at these obituaries. I looked at a few obituaries from the 1910s through early 1930s and found that the deceased individuals had relatives living in places such as East Boston, Winthrop, Longmeadow, Salem, and Somerville, Massachusetts; Klamath Falls, Oregon; Concord and Plymouth, New Hampshire; Hartland and Windsor, Vermont; Weathersfield, Connecticut, and Reading, Pennsylvania.

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    Stories of Interest

    Advances in Genetic Genealogy Announced
    FamilyTree DNA recently announced new avenues for DNA research at its 4th Inernational Conference on Genetic Genealogy in Houston. Get more details at home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20071101005229&newsLang=en.

    Rhode Island Cemeteries
    Providence Journal
    staff writer Donita Naylor published a scary Halloween story — one focusing on the historical cemeteries in Rhode Island that are being lost to neglect. On the more pleasant side, Naylor interviewed individuals who are working to preserve these “open air musems.” You can read the full story at www.projo.com/news/content/HISTORICAL_CEMETERIES_10-31-07_6G7J55L_v40.33deed6.html.

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a number of dynamic lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists and the general public. Programs are held at 101 Newbury Street unless otherwise indicated.

    The following programs will be held November 2007:

    Dwelling Place of Dragons
    Saturday, November 10, 2007, 10 a.m.
    Author Marjorie Harshaw Robie, seen on The Today Show and PBS, will present a three-part discussion of her new book Dwelling Place of Dragons, a fascinating look at the dangers of religious tyranny in Ireland between 1830 and 1849.

    Getting the Most from NEHGS Databases
    Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 10 a.m.
    With over 110 million names in 2,200 databases, NewEnglandAncestors.org is the primary internet resource for New England genealogy. This free lecture will offer an overview of the Society’s website and online databases.

     

    For more information about NEHGS programs, visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/ or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

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    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_homepage.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

    Copyright 2007, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

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