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  • 2006 Archive

  • Vol. 8, No. 46
    Whole #297
    November 22, 2006
    Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    Contents:
    * New on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * New Opportunity for Tax-deductible Gift to NEHGS
    * Name Origins
    * NEHGS Sales Flyer Now Available Online
    * NEHGS Library Inventory
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * Spotlight: Corpus Christi Public Libraries, Texas
    * Upcoming Public Lecture Series
    * Stories of Interest
    * From the Online Genealogist
    * Research Recommendations: Genealogical Writing: Latin Abbreviations
    * NEHGS Contact Information


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    New Databases on New EnglandAncestors.org

    New Table of Contents Search Capability for the Register
    http://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/register/default.asp

    This week, in response to input from our patrons, we have added a ‘Register Table of Contents’ search feature to our New England Historical and Genealogical Register database. This new capability allows keyword search of the titles of all Register articles from 1847 to 1998, making it much easier to locate multi-part articles and to identify articles according to their primary topic. Example topics are family names, place names, or a combination of the two. To use this new capability, just enter one or more keywords into the ‘Article Title Keywords’ field on the Register database search page. (Note that when one or more article title keywords are supplied, the ‘First Name’, ‘Last Name’, ‘Start Year’ and ‘End Year’ search fields are ignored.)

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    New Opportunity for Tax-deductible Gift to NEHGS

    In August this year, a Federal law was passed creating a new tax incentive for charitable giving. For donors seventy-and-a-half years old or older, the Pension Protection Act of 2006 encourages financial contributions to charitable organizations in the United States, providing a unique opportunity to make a gift to the Society.

    Under the new provisions, you can make a gift using funds from your individual retirement account (IRA), Roth IRA, or rollover IRA without undesirable tax consequences. If you are interested in learning more about supporting the New England Historic Genealogical Society through your individual retirement account and can satisfy certain conditions, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/tax_benefit2007.asp or contact Claudia Woods in our Development Office at 617-226-1238.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    JEHIEL (m) – Hebrew. In pre-Revolutionary western Connecticut, often (but not always) seen in Anglican families.

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    NEHGS Sales Flyer Now Available Online

    Just in time for holiday shopping, the latest NEHGS Sales Flyer, mailed to members earlier this month, is now available for viewing online at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/pdf/sales06_07.pdf.

    Please note that except for the Special Orders Catalog and all books in the Great Migration series, NEHGS books are distributed through Picton Press. To order any book online, go to www.NewEnglandAncestors.org/store. More ordering options are available on the last page of the flyer.

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    NEHGS Library Inventory

    NEHGS is planning inventory the library holdings during the week of January 29, 2007. The library will remain open during the inventory, but each library floor will be closed for a day or two while the collections are inventoried. On the day a floor is closed there will be no access to its materials. The schedule for floor closings is: Sixth floor, Jan. 30; Fifth floor, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1; Fourth floor Feb 2; and First floor Feb. 3. Library closures due to snow emergencies may change the closing schedule.

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Winter Research Weekend Getaway, February 8 - 10, 2007
    Research Weekend Getaways in Boston have been one of our most popular programs in recent years. Escape the winter doldrums and join the NEHGS staff for guided research, one-on-one consultations, lectures, and special access to the collections. Bring your charts and count on making research breakthroughs! All serious genealogists should treat themselves to this special program and to the opportunity to share discoveries and swap stories with other avid researchers from all over the country. Whether you are a first-time participant or have enjoyed this program in the past, you are sure to further your research by visiting our library in Boston. Don’t miss this opportunity to take advantage of our exceptional resources and the research expertise of our outstanding library staff. For accommodations, we suggest the nearby Charlesmark Hotel.

    Registration fees, $285 for the entire 3-day program; $95 per day.
    To register for the program visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/wintergetaway07.pdf.

    For more information about NEHGS programs visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/.

     

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    Spotlight: Corpus Christi Public Libraries, Texas
    by Valerie Beaudrault
    (http://lhdatabases.ccpl.ci.corpus-christi.tx.us/index.htm)

    The Local History Department of the Corpus Christi Public Libraries has a number of databases on its website. The source materials for the data found in these databases can be found in the libraries’ Special Collections and Archives. The 160 collections in the Archives include manuscripts, letters, photographs, maps, and other documents.

    Obituary Index
    The obituaries in this index were drawn from the Corpus Christi Caller, Corpus Christi Times and the Corpus Christi Caller-Times. This database covers the period from January 1950 through September 2006. Additional obituaries covering the period from 1883 to 1903 can be found in the Select Index. The 21,000-record obituary database can be browsed by decade by clicking on the appropriate link or as an alphabetical listing of all records by clicking on the “View all records” link. The index can be searched by decade or in its entirety. Search options include searching by first and last name and, for some decades, the exact date on which the obituary appeared in the newspaper. Database fields include last name, first name, and date on which the obituary appeared (not the date of death), as well as the newspaper title abbreviation and page number. A copy of an obituary can be ordered from the library through email or by written request.

    1883 – 1903 Select Index
    This database contains abstracts from the earliest existing issues of the Corpus Christi Caller, which can be found in the libraries’ microfilm collection. The few-hundred-record database, as noted in the title, covers the period 1883 – 1903. The items abstracted include births, deaths, marriage records, and early Corpus Christi black history. Clicking on the links to the individual databases will bring up an alphabetical list, which can be browsed.

    Births: The data fields in the birth notices index include surname, first name, father/mother name, date of event, date of publication, page number and comments. The births can be searched by last name, year of birth, and words found in the comments field. Twenty-eight birth records comprise this database.

    Deaths: The data fields in the death notices index include surname, first name, date of event, date published and page number, age and description. The deaths can be searched by last name, year of birth, and words found in the description field. The information in the description field ranges from a few words to a detailed obituary giving information such as birth date and the names of family members. There are 262 records in this database.

    Marriage Reports: The marriage notices have been indexed by the groom’s name and are listed in the complete index alphabetically by groom’s surname. The data fields in the marriage notices index include last name and first name of the groom, date of event, brides complete name, date published, page number, and description. The marriages can be searched by last name of the groom, bride’s name, year of publication, and words found in the description field. The information in the description field includes information such as hometown of each party, where they will reside after the wedding and where the ceremony took place. There are 48 records in this database.

    Divorces: The divorce notice index contains only 25 records, therefore no search options have been set up. The data fields in the marriage notices index include surname, plaintiff’s first name, defendant’s first name, date published, page number, case number and description.

    Early Black History: This database contains abstracts of articles related to the early history of the black community in Corpus Christi. Fourteen articles for the period from 1883 to 1903 have been abstracted. The data fields include surname or event, date of publication, page number and description. The database can be searched by last name (or event name), date, or words found in the detailed description.

    Postcard Index
    The Local History Department of the Corpus Christi Libraries has a collection of historic postcards, which show images of people and places in the city. There are more than 250 postcards in the collection dating from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. There is a Searchable Index, in addition to the Finding Guide for this collection. The Searchable Index provides a more detailed description of each postcard. The data provided includes subject of the postcard, the approximate date, and any message that may have been written on the back of the postcard. Some of the images may be viewed in the online image collection.

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    Upcoming Public Lecture Series

    Our lectures explore a wide range of research skills and sources and are free and open to the public. They are offered in the Richardson-Sloane Education Center at 101 Newbury Street on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10:00 A.M. unless otherwise stated. Advance registration is not necessary.


    Getting Started in Genealogy

    December 2, 2006, 10:00 AM
    New visitors will be welcomed, given a chance to introduce themselves, meet other new visitors, describe their research and have knowledgeable staff advise them on how to proceed. The thirty-minute welcome will be followed by a tour of the library.

     

     

    For more information about lectures offered by New England Historic Genealogical Society, please go to the Education homepage at www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main or call 1-888-286-3447.

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    Stories of Interest

    Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip paid their respects recently to Mahomet Weyonomon, of the Mohegan tribe, who died of smallpox in London in 1736. The Queen was presented with a peace pipe at the memorial service, a symbol of the righting of a wrong. Read the full story from the BBC at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/6172062.stm.

    Alumni magazines often feature profiles of individuals in celebration of their achievements. Colby College recently profiles a member of the class of 1997 who is also an African-American genealogist. Read the story at http://www.colby.edu/colby.mag/issues/current/alumni.php?issueid=36&nmid=243.

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    From the Online Genealogist

    Question:
    In the transcriptions of some wills a signature is printed which I assume means that the original will was signed. On some the signature is shown as (for example) "Thomas X Ranney" or "Bethia BS Stow", which I assume means the original will was signed with the ‘mark’ of the testator. I have encountered a few which are shown as (for example) "Samuel Stow, LS." What does the "LS." indicate? I have also found "Thomas X Ranney, LS."

    Answer:
    L.S. is the abbreviation in Latin of “Locus Sigilli.” L.S. marks the location where the seal was placed in the original. The abbreviation does not mean “Legal Signature,” as it is commonly misinterpreted.

    David Allen Lambert is the Society’s Online Genealogist. If you would like to ask him a question, contact him at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org or visit his blog at http://www.davidlambertblog.com/. For more information about the Online Genealogist visit www.newenglandancestors.org/research/main/online_genealogist.asp. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first-come, first-served basis.

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    Research Recommendations

    Genealogical Writing: Latin Abbreviations
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Many legal documents contain Latin terminology. In addition to full words, Latin abbreviations are used freely. Some Latin terms are more common than others, and some are so similar to each other that they cause confusion in the minds of some researchers. David Lambert discusses the use of L.S. or Locus Sigilli in his “From the Online Genealogist” column above. Three commonly-used Latin terms are et cetera, et alii, and et uxor. All start with the Latin word “et,” which means “and.”

    Et cetera is very commonly used in everyday conversation as well as legal documents. It translates into “and so forth.” Nowadays it is abbreviated as etc. but it may also be abbreviated as &c. Et cetera is used to indicate that a list can continue on. For example, one might see a list of months as January, February, March, etc.

    Et alii, et alios, and et aliis translate to “and others.” All are abbreviated as et al. or & al. This term is used to indicate that individuals other than the person being discussed are involved. It is frequently used in grantor/grantee indexes when more than one party is a grantor (or grantee). For example, one might see Matthew Gibbs, et. al. listed as a grantor in the index. Upon examination of the document, one sees that Matthew Gibbs, Joseph Goodenough, and Thankful Gibbs were co-owners of the property and they were selling their combined shares of the land. Checking the grantor index again, one would see Thankful Gibbs, et al. and Joseph Goodenough, et al. listed as well.

    Et uxor is abbreviated as et ux. or & ux. This term translates into “and wife.” Also commonly used in indexes, it indicates that the person’s wife was also mentioned in the document.

    Please note that “et” is a full word, and never has a period after it in an abbreviation (because it is not being shortened).

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    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_main.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/giving/.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

    Copyright 2006, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

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888-296-3447

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