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  • 2005 Archive

  • Vol. 7, No. 4
    Whole #203
    January 26, 2005
    Edited by Rod D. Moody and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to NEHGS members and friends who have subscribed to it, or submitted their email addresses on various membership and sales department forms and website notices. NEHGS recognizes the importance of its members' privacy, and will not give away, sell or lease personal information.

    If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the page and follow the instructions provided.

    Copyright 2005, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Contents:

    * Faster Search Results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!
    * Register Now for NEHGS Research Getaways
    * New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * A Preview of the January Register
    * The Online Genealogist: New Topic and Past Answers
    * Spotlight on State Archives: Illinois State Archives
    * NEHGS Seeks Volunteers for Ambassador Program
    * New Book Will Help You Scale Your Brick Walls
    * Enjoy Nutshell Lectures at Home!
    * Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library
    * Favorite - and Black Sheep - Ancestor Feedback
    * NEHGS Contact Information

    Faster Search Results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!

    Those of you who use the searchable databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org on a regular basis are aware that the database searches have suffered from poor performance issues in the past few weeks. The website team at NEHGS spent considerable time and effort testing the databases and analyzing the problem, and we are delighted to announce that you can now get results from our databases faster than ever before!

    While troubleshooting, we called a halt to all new database additions in order to stabilize the platform and to allow us to continue analysis in an unchanging environment. Therefore, no new databases were made available in the past week. All efforts are being made to ensure that this problem will not occur again.

    We apologize for the inconvenience that our users have experienced, and we thank you for your comments, your suggestions, and most importantly, your patience. We believe that you will be pleasantly surprised with the new high-speed search results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!

    Try a search now at http://www.NewEnglandAncestors.org.


    Register Now for NEHGS Research Getaways

    Winter - February 24-26, 2005
    Spring - April 7-9, 2005

    There is no better time than the cold winter season to hunker down and make progress with your genealogical research. And there is no better place to make real breakthroughs with your research than at the NEHGS Library during our annual Weekend Research Getaways!

    Think about it - you will have full access to over 200,000 books, periodicals, and microtext items, plus over one million manuscript items, plus free access to Heritage Quest, Ancestry, and our comprehensive CD-ROM collection. Explore genealogies, town, county, and state histories, vital records, census records, land records, probate records, city directories, immigration records, unpublished manuscripts, every essential reference, and much more - for three full days!

    Better still, you will receive personal consultations from some of the most knowledgeable and respected genealogists in the field today. Gary Boyd Roberts, our senior research scholar, can take one look at a chart and immediately begin to list sources to check, and he can tell you within minutes if there is evidence of royal descent.. David Curtis Dearborn, CG, will provide expert advice on Massachusetts and Maine research, English research, and New England in general. He can tell you exactly where you need to look and what to look for. Ask David or George Freeman Sanborn, Jr., about your Scottish roots and be prepared to be surprised by the scope of their expertise. George and Michael J. Leclerc are the Society's Canadian specialists - let them guide you through the vast Canadian resources at NEHGS.

    Got some Irish in you? Look no further than our resident expert, Marie Daly, who will show you everything you need to check before going across the pond. She will also point you in the right direction for ninteenth- and twentieth-century immigrant research. David Allen Lambert is the one to consult about military records and cemetery research, and he can give sound advice on probate and land records, as well as Internet and CD-ROM resources.

    Other staff genealogists and their specialties include Chris Child on Southern New England research, nineteenth- and twentieth-century research, genetics and genealogy; Daniel L. Duncan on New England and Southern states research, southern migration, social history and genealogy, and Internet research; Julie Otto on given names, Connecticut, female lines, and general New England; and Ruth Quigley Wellner on New England research (with an emphasis on Massachusetts), probate and deed research, census research, cemetery research, and matrilineal line research.

    Did we mention that you can take advantage of all of these resources and consultations for three full days? Do not delay any longer! Register for one of our Research Getaways today, formulate a research plan by searching for resources in our online Library Catalog, and decide which librarian's specialties match your needs. Then come to Boston and let us help you knock down the brick wall!

    Download a registration form at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/download/Research_Getaway_05.pdf.
    Note: You must have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer to download the form. Download it for free at http://www.adobe.com.

    For additional information visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/research_getaways.asp or email Amanda Batey at tours@nehgs.org.


     

    New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Learning Support: Scholarships, Grants, and Fellowships of Interest to Family Historians
    By Erika Dreifus

    Of course, we all know that historical research is rewarding in and of itself. Family history and genealogical researchers, in particular, understand how satisfying it can be simply to discover something new about an individual or collective past. Still, sometimes it can be affirming - and helpful to our budgets - to receive financial support for our endeavors, especially if we're seeking to improve our research skills or delve much further into a specific project or topic.

    Lucky for us, support is available in many forms. If you're hoping to attend an institute or take courses to expand your genealogical knowledge base, you may be interested in a scholarship. If you're focusing on a specific research area or long-term project, you may want to investigate available grants or fellowships.

    About the author: Erika Dreifus (Ed.M., M.F.A., Ph.D.) earned her doctorate in history from Harvard University. Her articles on family history research have appeared in Ancestry, Family Chronicle, and Family Tree Magazine's Trace Your Family History. Visit her website at http://www.practicing-writer.com/.

    The full article is available to NEHGS members at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/research/special_topics/hot_topics/learningsupport.asp.


    A Preview of the January Register

    We start this issue with Bigamy in Boston: The Case of Matthew Cary and Mary Sylvester, adapted from Brenton Simons' forthcoming book on colonial Boston miscreants. Matthew Cary had a wife back in London when he married Mary Sylvester in 1693. However, he was not accused of bigamy until 1698, and he escaped conviction in Boston when the law was changed in his favor while his case was pending. This article demonstrates the riches of the Suffolk Files at the Massachusetts State Archives.

    Who would have thought that the 1776 Census of Providence, Rhode Island, was hidden away in the Rhode Island State Archives - not published, not copied, not microfilmed? Author Cherry Fletcher Bamberg discovered it and presents it here with a valuable explanatory introduction. Since the census was taken after the outbreak of the American Revolution, it lists many refugees from Newport and Boston.

    Sometimes there are seventeenth-century genealogical problems that have only been indirectly addressed because the problem is not the main focus of anything that has been published. Such is the case with Joan Hunter's article, Clarifying John2 Holton of Northampton and Dedham, Massachusetts, and His Wife, Abigail Fisher. The evidence was all there but no one had put it together and published it until now.

    The Death of Henry Sewall in 1628: Puzzles, Evidence, and Solutions examines the evidence for the date of death of the father of Henry1 Sewall of Essex County, Massachusetts, and great-grandfather of the famous Judge Samuel Sewall. Fortunately, the decedent was a prosperous man, and by comparing two probates and an inquisition post mortem, the author determined the correct date in 1628.

    Because of a notarial record in Boston, The English Origin of Rebecca Crooke, Wife of Peter Gardner of Roxbury, Massachusetts, has long been known. Leslie Mahler has discovered the baptisms of most of Rebecca's siblings at St. Clement Danes in London.

    Author Gene Zubrinsky gives us two related articles straightening out certain problems with the published genealogies of the descendants of William2 Carpenter of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Both articles are complex, but the chart on page 54 will help readers understand the solutions. The first article, Three John Carpenters: A Chain of Mistaken Identities, pieces of the lives of three related men named John Carpenter who had been wrongly linked; the author assigns the correct records to each man. In the second article, Abiah3 Carpenter of Warwick, Rhode Island, and His Family, the author corrects and augments previous accounts of Abiah Carpenter and his children. In the first appendix he pokes holes in the idea that the Rehoboth Carpenter family was closely related to the family of William1 Carpenter of Providence, Rhode Island, and demolishes purported ancestry. In the second appendix he demonstrates that William1 Carpenter of Providence arrived in New England about 1636 or 1637 and married Elizabeth Arnold there about 1637.

    We conclude The Origins of Benjamin1 Nye: Examining the Sources with a careful account of Benjamin1 Nye and his eight children. He married Katherine Tupper in 1640 at Sandwich, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Thomas1 Tupper, and a footnote in the article presents evidence that Thomas was from Sussex, as traditionally claimed.

    We include more Burial Records from the Account Book of Thomas Clap of Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1762-1797, covering the years 1775 to 1785. The deaths of many unnamed soldiers were recorded in 1775 and 1776.

    Henry Hoff, Editor


    The Online Genealogist: New Topic and Past Answers

    David Allen Lambert, the NEHGS Online Genealogist, is ready to take your questions on February's topic - US and Canadian military research. The Online Genealogist offers research guidance, orientation to online resources and library-based collections, and will facilitate referrals to specific NEHGS staff experts and departments when required.

    Each month the Online Genealogist will answer your questions on a specific topic. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first come, first-served basis. In some cases he may need to refer individuals to the NEHGS Research Service for more in-depth research services for a fee.

    NEHGS members and potential members are invited to contact the NEHGS Online Genealogist at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org.

    Here is a sample of questions and answers on January's topic, nineteenth-century Massachusetts research.

    Question: Please direct me as to the research most useful in learning of the emigration of John Gerow Belyea from New Brunswick to Massachusetts. He is in the N.B. marriage records as of November 21, 1877. The next record I have located finds him paying poll tax in Somerville, Massachusetts, in 1887. Where do I look for his move from New Brunswick to Massachusetts?

    Answer: Canadian entry into the United States by land was often overlooked by the authorities until the year 1895. Large numbers of Canadians would cross the border to work and then would return, so it is understandable why it was ignored at the time

    The Alphabetical Index to Canadian Border Entries Through Small Ports in Vermont 1895-1924 (Call # CS68/U61/M1462) and the Soundex Index to Canadian Border Entries Through St. Albans, VT, District, 1895-1924 (CS68/U61/M1461) can be found in the NEHGS microtext library. However, for an earlier immigration, you would have refer to the Boston passenger lists. The Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, 1848-1891, on microfilm at NEHGS (CS68/I532/M265), would seem to fit your time frame. There are unindexed passenger lists for earlier and later time periods available as well.

    Also, if the individual became a citizen of the United States, his arrival information may be noted in his intention for citizenship declaration. NEHGS has the Index to New England Naturalization Petitions, 1791-1906 on microfilm (CS68/I53/M1299), and we also can obtain the actual records if you so desire.

    If you would like the NEHGS Research Service to search these records for you please visit their web page at https://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/depth/search.asp.

    Question: I have an ancestor named George W. Morse. His death record, filed in Providence, Rhode Island, lists his birthplace as Boston, in 1807. His parents are listed as Arnold and Jane. Boston did not record births at that time. Where can I look for more information about the birth of George Morse and his parents?

    Answer: I suggest that you consult the following record sources for information on Arnold and Jane (----) Morse.

    1. Consult Boston city directories to determine when and where Arnold lived in Boston, as well as his occupation. NEHGS has all surviving Boston city directories published between 1789 and 1981 in the fourth-floor microtext room.

    2. Check the Suffolk County Probate Records (NEHGS call # F72/S9/S835, microfilm) to see if Arnold or Jane had a will or an administration. For more information on probate records read Pat Hatcher's "Probate Inventories: A Window to Your Ancestor’s World."

    3. Suffolk County Deeds are another good source to determine the arrival and departure of an individual in Boston, providing he or she owned real estate. NEHGS has these on microfilm from 1639 to 1885 (F72/S9/S845). Want to learn more about land records? Read Pat Hatcher's "Land Records: New England's Under-Appreciated Genealogical Source."

    4. Boston Marriages, 1801-1848, on microfiche at NEHGS. These indexed records may be of use to you, providing Arnold was married in Boston. There is also a published version of Boston Marriages, 1752-1809 (F 73.1/B74/v30, also available from the Circulating Library).

    I performed a quick search of the NEHGS Register online database for you, which produced an interesting match.

    NEHGR Vol. 44
    Needham Marriages:
    Arnold Morse of Cambridge married to Miss Sally Hunting of Needham, April 6, 1797 [p. 396]
    Arnold Morse married to Miss Jane Giles, Dec. 2, 1810, both of Needham [p. 400]

    If this is the right Arnold, Sally may have been George's mother, and she perhaps died between 1807 and 1810. It could be that after Sally's death, Arnold married Jane in 1810, and Jane raised George. This is just a possible link for you to try.

    If you are not able to come to the NEHGS Library to continue your research you may wish to enlist the services of the NEHGS Research Department who can be hired to investigate the above suggestions for you. Please visit please visit their web page at https://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/depth/search.asp for further information.


     

    Spotlight on State Archives: Illinois State Archives
    http://www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html

    The Illinois State Archives have an extensive collection of online databases that may prove useful to those of you researching your Illinois ancestors. Among the databases you will find indexes to a variety of vital statistics records, court records, almshouse registers, and veterans' rolls.

    The databases can be searched individually by clicking on the specific database link on the homepage or you can opt to use the Global Database Search, which enables you to examine all of the databases on the website at the same time. To initiate a search, enter a complete surname followed by a comma into the search box. The results are returned in the form of a list of the databases in which the name you are seeking may be found. Clicking on a database link will take you directly to the individual database search screen. The next step is to perform a search of the specific database. Search results may include the volume and page number of the original source, date of the event, and other database specific information. To read a description of the database and the records it indexes, press the back arrow button located at the very bottom of the search screen.

    The following is a sampling of the databases:

    The Databases of Illinois Veterans
    This collection includes databases for the War of 1812, the Winnebago War, the Black Hawk War, the Mexican War, the Civil War, and the Spanish-American War.

    Illinois Servitude and Emancipation Records Database
    Over three thousand names of servants, slaves, or free persons and masters, witnesses, or related parties were extracted from governmental records involving the servitude and emancipation of Africans for the period from 1722 to 1863 to create this database. The records also include some Indians.

    Illinois Statewide Vital Records Databases
    Marriage index, 1763-1900; death index, pre-1916; and death index 1916-1950.

    The global search feature also searches the records collections found in several Illinois Regional Archives Depositories (IRAD). These databases include indexes to birth and death certificate registers and court records such as coroner's inquest files, probate case files, circuit court criminal case files, and will record indexes. There are also indexes for almshouse and poor farm records; Chicago Police Department homicide records, 1870-1930; and some county naturalization papers.

    There are many databases available on the Illinois State Archives website. You can check them out at http://www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html.


    NEHGS Seeks Volunteers for Ambassador Program

    NEHGS would like to hear from members who are interested in representing the Society as a volunteer in their regions. We launched the NEHGS Ambassador Program in 2004 with eighteen members around the United States. These individuals have helped promote the Society by placing brochures in area libraries and historical societies, speaking to local organizations, representing NEHGS at genealogy events and fairs, and more - all to ensure that NEHGS is not the best kept secret in genealogy.

    If you would be interested in helping us spread the word about NEHGS, we'd like to hear from you. If you're already actively promoting us in your neighborhood, please let us know. Please contact NEHGS marketing director Laura Prescott at lgprescott@nehgs.org for more information.


    New Book Will Help You Scale Your Brick Walls

    Family Tree Books has announced the publication of The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall, by former NEHGS trustee, Marsha Hoffman Rising, CG, FASG. In this book, Rising demonstrates how to discover new research paths after hitting dead ends by "breaking down the elements with straightforward solutions."

    Augmenting her clear and concise advice with examples from real case studies, Rising guides the reader through both common and unique genealogical dilemmas. How often have you asked some variation of the following questions? Why isn't my ancestor in the census? What do I do when the records are destroyed? Where do I find the records before civil registration? There are twenty John Browns in Merrimack Co. in 1800 - which one is mine?

    Marsha Rising works through these and many other examples of brick wall situations in this soon-to-be-classic reference book appropriate for genealogists of all levels.

    Order The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall from http://www.amazon.com.


    Enjoy Nutshell Lectures at Home!

    Haven't been able to attend a Genealogy in a Nutshell lecture in Boston? We invite you to borrow an audio tape of a past lecture from the Circulating Library and receive guidance - at your convenience - from some of the top experts in the field of genealogy. There are currently fifty-seven Nutshell lectures available for loan through the Circulating Library.

    The following is a small sampling of the "Nutshell" sound cassette recordings available through the Circulating Library:

    "Beyond Clans & Tartans: Scottish Genealogical Research" with George F. Sanborn, Jr.
    "Caring for Your Treasured Books" with Deborah Rossi
    "Clues and Context: What Social History Can Tell You About Your Family History" with Jean Maguire
    "The Collections of the State Library of Massachusetts" with Eva Murphy
    "Death by Lightning: The Shocking Facts" with Julie Helen Otto
    "From Cordage to Cosmology: The Collections of the New Bedford Whaling Museum" with Michael P. Dyer

     

    A special type of search must be made in our online library catalog to find Nutshell lectures on tape. To search for a complete list of "Nutshell" sound cassette recordings, follow these steps:

    1. Click on the link to the NEHGS online catalog located in www.newenglandancestors.org.
    2. Click on the Advanced Search link, which will bring you to a page with six boxes containing drop-down lists.
    3. Choose "Document Type" for box #1 and "Series" for box #2 from the drop-down lists.
    4. Click on Search. This will bring you to a new page.
    5. Choose your specific Document Type - "Sound Cassette" - from the drop-down list and type the Series name - "Nutshell" - in the space provided below.
    6. Click the Search button to bring up the complete list.

    If you have any questions about using the Circulating Library, please call, toll-free, 1-888-296-3447, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time) or email bookloan@nehgs.org. To learn more about the Circulating Library and borrow books online, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/libraries/circulation/.

    Remember, you can now borrow up to three books, CDs, or cassettes by returnable pouch for the low cost of $9 per item!


     

     

    Upcoming Genealogy in a Nutshell Lectures at the NEHGS Library

    The Great Meadow: Husbandry in Colonial Concord with Dr. Brian Donahue on January 29, 2005

    Brandeis University professor and Meyerhoff Chair of American Environmental Studies, Brian Donahue, has made a substantial contribution toward the understanding of colonial life in New England in his book, The Great Meadow: Farmers and the Land in Colonial Concord. Please join him as he discusses his innovative research of the people and land in early Concord, Massachusetts.

    Getting the Most from NEHGS: CD-ROMs with Michael J. Leclerc on February 2 and 5, 2005

    From Barnstable to Watertown, and from Bibles to Irish newspapers, NEHGS has New England covered in its published CD-ROMs. The powerful search engine allows genealogists to conduct complex queries from the comprehensive databases. NEHGS director of special projects, Michael J. Leclerc, will explain how to get the most information from NEHGS CD-ROMs.

    All lectures take place at 10:15 a.m. at the NEHGS Library in Boston. Advance registration is not necessary. For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit our online Education Center at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/. If you have questions, please call Member Services at 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday.


    Favorite - and Black Sheep - Ancestor Feedback

    Each week we ask the questions "Who is your favorite ancestor? Who is your favorite black sheep ancestor? Why?" If you would like to contribute information on your favorite and/or black sheep ancestor, please send your story in 300 words or less to Rod Moody at enews@nehgs.org. Thank you to all past and future contributors!

    My Black Sheep Ancestor
    by Elizabeth Lapointe of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    Andrew Barclay, a Scottish bookbinder in Boston, was a Loyalist in the Revolution and had to leave his bustling business in Cornhill for a place on a warship to Halifax, Nova Scotia, on Evacuation Day, March 17, 1776. He eventually went to New York, but evacuated that city at the end of April 1783 with the fall of the British, and went to live in Port Roseway (now Shelburne), Nova Scotia.

    It seems that his grandson, Andrew Barclay - the black sheep of the family - was born there in 1815, and was a bit restless. Although he was married with six children, ran a store in Shelburne, and worked in the customs office, life was not satisfactory for him, and he left about 1861, either for Boston, Massachusetts, or for the Caribbean.

    There is word that he worked for the Customs Office in Boston before going to the Caribbean, but no record has been found. Neither has any record been found in the Caribbean. (His son, Charles Robert Barclay, who came to Boston from Shelburne sometime in the late 1800s, did establish a business, the Barclay & Clements Co. Inc. on Atlantic Street in Boston. It sold Nova Scotia lobster and blueberries on consignment in Boston.) It has been reported in family tradition that Andrew was killed by the crew of the ship he was on in the Caribbean, and that he died at Santo Domingo on September 4, 1865.

    His wife, Mary Elizabeth Webster Morton, eventually left Nova Scotia with her daughter, Annie Louisa Haley, for California, where she died in 1907.

    The questions remain - why did Andrew Barclay leave his wife of ten years with six small children? Was he in Boston from 1861 to 1865? And why did he go to the Caribbean and die there in 1865?


     

    NEHGS Contact Information

    We strongly encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/emnehgs_enews_em_659_6.asp.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.Edited by Rod D. Moody and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to NEHGS members and friends who have subscribed to it, or submitted their email addresses on various membership and sales department forms and website notices. NEHGS recognizes the importance of its members' privacy, and will not give away, sell or lease personal information.

    If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the page and follow the instructions provided.

    Copyright 2005, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Contents:

    * Faster Search Results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!
    * Register Now for NEHGS Research Getaways
    * New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * A Preview of the January Register
    * The Online Genealogist: New Topic and Past Answers
    * Spotlight on State Archives: Illinois State Archives
    * NEHGS Seeks Volunteers for Ambassador Program
    * New Book Will Help You Scale Your Brick Walls
    * Enjoy Nutshell Lectures at Home!
    * Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library
    * Favorite - and Black Sheep - Ancestor Feedback
    * NEHGS Contact Information

    Faster Search Results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!

    Those of you who use the searchable databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org on a regular basis are aware that the database searches have suffered from poor performance issues in the past few weeks. The website team at NEHGS spent considerable time and effort testing the databases and analyzing the problem, and we are delighted to announce that you can now get results from our databases faster than ever before!

    While troubleshooting, we called a halt to all new database additions in order to stabilize the platform and to allow us to continue analysis in an unchanging environment. Therefore, no new databases were made available in the past week. All efforts are being made to ensure that this problem will not occur again.

    We apologize for the inconvenience that our users have experienced, and we thank you for your comments, your suggestions, and most importantly, your patience. We believe that you will be pleasantly surprised with the new high-speed search results on NewEnglandAncestors.org!

    Try a search now at http://www.NewEnglandAncestors.org.


    Register Now for NEHGS Research Getaways

    Winter - February 24-26, 2005
    Spring - April 7-9, 2005

    There is no better time than the cold winter season to hunker down and make progress with your genealogical research. And there is no better place to make real breakthroughs with your research than at the NEHGS Library during our annual Weekend Research Getaways!

    Think about it - you will have full access to over 200,000 books, periodicals, and microtext items, plus over one million manuscript items, plus free access to Heritage Quest, Ancestry, and our comprehensive CD-ROM collection. Explore genealogies, town, county, and state histories, vital records, census records, land records, probate records, city directories, immigration records, unpublished manuscripts, every essential reference, and much more - for three full days!

    Better still, you will receive personal consultations from some of the most knowledgeable and respected genealogists in the field today. Gary Boyd Roberts, our senior research scholar, can take one look at a chart and immediately begin to list sources to check, and he can tell you within minutes if there is evidence of royal descent.. David Curtis Dearborn, CG, will provide expert advice on Massachusetts and Maine research, English research, and New England in general. He can tell you exactly where you need to look and what to look for. Ask David or George Freeman Sanborn, Jr., about your Scottish roots and be prepared to be surprised by the scope of their expertise. George and Michael J. Leclerc are the Society's Canadian specialists - let them guide you through the vast Canadian resources at NEHGS.

    Got some Irish in you? Look no further than our resident expert, Marie Daly, who will show you everything you need to check before going across the pond. She will also point you in the right direction for ninteenth- and twentieth-century immigrant research. David Allen Lambert is the one to consult about military records and cemetery research, and he can give sound advice on probate and land records, as well as Internet and CD-ROM resources.

    Other staff genealogists and their specialties include Chris Child on Southern New England research, nineteenth- and twentieth-century research, genetics and genealogy; Daniel L. Duncan on New England and Southern states research, southern migration, social history and genealogy, and Internet research; Julie Otto on given names, Connecticut, female lines, and general New England; and Ruth Quigley Wellner on New England research (with an emphasis on Massachusetts), probate and deed research, census research, cemetery research, and matrilineal line research.

    Did we mention that you can take advantage of all of these resources and consultations for three full days? Do not delay any longer! Register for one of our Research Getaways today, formulate a research plan by searching for resources in our online Library Catalog, and decide which librarian's specialties match your needs. Then come to Boston and let us help you knock down the brick wall!

    Download a registration form at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/download/Research_Getaway_05.pdf.
    Note: You must have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer to download the form. Download it for free at http://www.adobe.com.

    For additional information visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/research_getaways.asp or email Amanda Batey at tours@nehgs.org.


     

    New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Learning Support: Scholarships, Grants, and Fellowships of Interest to Family Historians
    By Erika Dreifus

    Of course, we all know that historical research is rewarding in and of itself. Family history and genealogical researchers, in particular, understand how satisfying it can be simply to discover something new about an individual or collective past. Still, sometimes it can be affirming - and helpful to our budgets - to receive financial support for our endeavors, especially if we're seeking to improve our research skills or delve much further into a specific project or topic.

    Lucky for us, support is available in many forms. If you're hoping to attend an institute or take courses to expand your genealogical knowledge base, you may be interested in a scholarship. If you're focusing on a specific research area or long-term project, you may want to investigate available grants or fellowships.

    About the author: Erika Dreifus (Ed.M., M.F.A., Ph.D.) earned her doctorate in history from Harvard University. Her articles on family history research have appeared in Ancestry, Family Chronicle, and Family Tree Magazine's Trace Your Family History. Visit her website at http://www.practicing-writer.com/.

    The full article is available to NEHGS members at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/research/special_topics/hot_topics/learningsupport.asp.


    A Preview of the January Register

    We start this issue with Bigamy in Boston: The Case of Matthew Cary and Mary Sylvester, adapted from Brenton Simons' forthcoming book on colonial Boston miscreants. Matthew Cary had a wife back in London when he married Mary Sylvester in 1693. However, he was not accused of bigamy until 1698, and he escaped conviction in Boston when the law was changed in his favor while his case was pending. This article demonstrates the riches of the Suffolk Files at the Massachusetts State Archives.

    Who would have thought that the 1776 Census of Providence, Rhode Island, was hidden away in the Rhode Island State Archives - not published, not copied, not microfilmed? Author Cherry Fletcher Bamberg discovered it and presents it here with a valuable explanatory introduction. Since the census was taken after the outbreak of the American Revolution, it lists many refugees from Newport and Boston.

    Sometimes there are seventeenth-century genealogical problems that have only been indirectly addressed because the problem is not the main focus of anything that has been published. Such is the case with Joan Hunter's article, Clarifying John2 Holton of Northampton and Dedham, Massachusetts, and His Wife, Abigail Fisher. The evidence was all there but no one had put it together and published it until now.

    The Death of Henry Sewall in 1628: Puzzles, Evidence, and Solutions examines the evidence for the date of death of the father of Henry1 Sewall of Essex County, Massachusetts, and great-grandfather of the famous Judge Samuel Sewall. Fortunately, the decedent was a prosperous man, and by comparing two probates and an inquisition post mortem, the author determined the correct date in 1628.

    Because of a notarial record in Boston, The English Origin of Rebecca Crooke, Wife of Peter Gardner of Roxbury, Massachusetts, has long been known. Leslie Mahler has discovered the baptisms of most of Rebecca's siblings at St. Clement Danes in London.

    Author Gene Zubrinsky gives us two related articles straightening out certain problems with the published genealogies of the descendants of William2 Carpenter of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Both articles are complex, but the chart on page 54 will help readers understand the solutions. The first article, Three John Carpenters: A Chain of Mistaken Identities, pieces of the lives of three related men named John Carpenter who had been wrongly linked; the author assigns the correct records to each man. In the second article, Abiah3 Carpenter of Warwick, Rhode Island, and His Family, the author corrects and augments previous accounts of Abiah Carpenter and his children. In the first appendix he pokes holes in the idea that the Rehoboth Carpenter family was closely related to the family of William1 Carpenter of Providence, Rhode Island, and demolishes purported ancestry. In the second appendix he demonstrates that William1 Carpenter of Providence arrived in New England about 1636 or 1637 and married Elizabeth Arnold there about 1637.

    We conclude The Origins of Benjamin1 Nye: Examining the Sources with a careful account of Benjamin1 Nye and his eight children. He married Katherine Tupper in 1640 at Sandwich, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Thomas1 Tupper, and a footnote in the article presents evidence that Thomas was from Sussex, as traditionally claimed.

    We include more Burial Records from the Account Book of Thomas Clap of Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1762-1797, covering the years 1775 to 1785. The deaths of many unnamed soldiers were recorded in 1775 and 1776.

    Henry Hoff, Editor


    The Online Genealogist: New Topic and Past Answers

    David Allen Lambert, the NEHGS Online Genealogist, is ready to take your questions on February's topic - US and Canadian military research. The Online Genealogist offers research guidance, orientation to online resources and library-based collections, and will facilitate referrals to specific NEHGS staff experts and departments when required.

    Each month the Online Genealogist will answer your questions on a specific topic. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first come, first-served basis. In some cases he may need to refer individuals to the NEHGS Research Service for more in-depth research services for a fee.

    NEHGS members and potential members are invited to contact the NEHGS Online Genealogist at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org.

    Here is a sample of questions and answers on January's topic, nineteenth-century Massachusetts research.

    Question: Please direct me as to the research most useful in learning of the emigration of John Gerow Belyea from New Brunswick to Massachusetts. He is in the N.B. marriage records as of November 21, 1877. The next record I have located finds him paying poll tax in Somerville, Massachusetts, in 1887. Where do I look for his move from New Brunswick to Massachusetts?

    Answer: Canadian entry into the United States by land was often overlooked by the authorities until the year 1895. Large numbers of Canadians would cross the border to work and then would return, so it is understandable why it was ignored at the time

    The Alphabetical Index to Canadian Border Entries Through Small Ports in Vermont 1895-1924 (Call # CS68/U61/M1462) and the Soundex Index to Canadian Border Entries Through St. Albans, VT, District, 1895-1924 (CS68/U61/M1461) can be found in the NEHGS microtext library. However, for an earlier immigration, you would have refer to the Boston passenger lists. The Index to Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Boston, 1848-1891, on microfilm at NEHGS (CS68/I532/M265), would seem to fit your time frame. There are unindexed passenger lists for earlier and later time periods available as well.

    Also, if the individual became a citizen of the United States, his arrival information may be noted in his intention for citizenship declaration. NEHGS has the Index to New England Naturalization Petitions, 1791-1906 on microfilm (CS68/I53/M1299), and we also can obtain the actual records if you so desire.

    If you would like the NEHGS Research Service to search these records for you please visit their web page at https://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/depth/search.asp.

    Question: I have an ancestor named George W. Morse. His death record, filed in Providence, Rhode Island, lists his birthplace as Boston, in 1807. His parents are listed as Arnold and Jane. Boston did not record births at that time. Where can I look for more information about the birth of George Morse and his parents?

    Answer: I suggest that you consult the following record sources for information on Arnold and Jane (----) Morse.

    1. Consult Boston city directories to determine when and where Arnold lived in Boston, as well as his occupation. NEHGS has all surviving Boston city directories published between 1789 and 1981 in the fourth-floor microtext room.

    2. Check the Suffolk County Probate Records (NEHGS call # F72/S9/S835, microfilm) to see if Arnold or Jane had a will or an administration. For more information on probate records read Pat Hatcher's "Probate Inventories: A Window to Your Ancestor’s World."

    3. Suffolk County Deeds are another good source to determine the arrival and departure of an individual in Boston, providing he or she owned real estate. NEHGS has these on microfilm from 1639 to 1885 (F72/S9/S845). Want to learn more about land records? Read Pat Hatcher's "Land Records: New England's Under-Appreciated Genealogical Source."

    4. Boston Marriages, 1801-1848, on microfiche at NEHGS. These indexed records may be of use to you, providing Arnold was married in Boston. There is also a published version of Boston Marriages, 1752-1809 (F 73.1/B74/v30, also available from the Circulating Library).

    I performed a quick search of the NEHGS Register online database for you, which produced an interesting match.

    NEHGR Vol. 44
    Needham Marriages:
    Arnold Morse of Cambridge married to Miss Sally Hunting of Needham, April 6, 1797 [p. 396]
    Arnold Morse married to Miss Jane Giles, Dec. 2, 1810, both of Needham [p. 400]

    If this is the right Arnold, Sally may have been George's mother, and she perhaps died between 1807 and 1810. It could be that after Sally's death, Arnold married Jane in 1810, and Jane raised George. This is just a possible link for you to try.

    If you are not able to come to the NEHGS Library to continue your research you may wish to enlist the services of the NEHGS Research Department who can be hired to investigate the above suggestions for you. Please visit please visit their web page at https://www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/depth/search.asp for further information.


     

    Spotlight on State Archives: Illinois State Archives
    http://www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html

    The Illinois State Archives have an extensive collection of online databases that may prove useful to those of you researching your Illinois ancestors. Among the databases you will find indexes to a variety of vital statistics records, court records, almshouse registers, and veterans' rolls.

    The databases can be searched individually by clicking on the specific database link on the homepage or you can opt to use the Global Database Search, which enables you to examine all of the databases on the website at the same time. To initiate a search, enter a complete surname followed by a comma into the search box. The results are returned in the form of a list of the databases in which the name you are seeking may be found. Clicking on a database link will take you directly to the individual database search screen. The next step is to perform a search of the specific database. Search results may include the volume and page number of the original source, date of the event, and other database specific information. To read a description of the database and the records it indexes, press the back arrow button located at the very bottom of the search screen.

    The following is a sampling of the databases:

    The Databases of Illinois Veterans
    This collection includes databases for the War of 1812, the Winnebago War, the Black Hawk War, the Mexican War, the Civil War, and the Spanish-American War.

    Illinois Servitude and Emancipation Records Database
    Over three thousand names of servants, slaves, or free persons and masters, witnesses, or related parties were extracted from governmental records involving the servitude and emancipation of Africans for the period from 1722 to 1863 to create this database. The records also include some Indians.

    Illinois Statewide Vital Records Databases
    Marriage index, 1763-1900; death index, pre-1916; and death index 1916-1950.

    The global search feature also searches the records collections found in several Illinois Regional Archives Depositories (IRAD). These databases include indexes to birth and death certificate registers and court records such as coroner's inquest files, probate case files, circuit court criminal case files, and will record indexes. There are also indexes for almshouse and poor farm records; Chicago Police Department homicide records, 1870-1930; and some county naturalization papers.

    There are many databases available on the Illinois State Archives website. You can check them out at http://www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html.


    NEHGS Seeks Volunteers for Ambassador Program

    NEHGS would like to hear from members who are interested in representing the Society as a volunteer in their regions. We launched the NEHGS Ambassador Program in 2004 with eighteen members around the United States. These individuals have helped promote the Society by placing brochures in area libraries and historical societies, speaking to local organizations, representing NEHGS at genealogy events and fairs, and more - all to ensure that NEHGS is not the best kept secret in genealogy.

    If you would be interested in helping us spread the word about NEHGS, we'd like to hear from you. If you're already actively promoting us in your neighborhood, please let us know. Please contact NEHGS marketing director Laura Prescott at lgprescott@nehgs.org for more information.


    New Book Will Help You Scale Your Brick Walls

    Family Tree Books has announced the publication of The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall, by former NEHGS trustee, Marsha Hoffman Rising, CG, FASG. In this book, Rising demonstrates how to discover new research paths after hitting dead ends by "breaking down the elements with straightforward solutions."

    Augmenting her clear and concise advice with examples from real case studies, Rising guides the reader through both common and unique genealogical dilemmas. How often have you asked some variation of the following questions? Why isn't my ancestor in the census? What do I do when the records are destroyed? Where do I find the records before civil registration? There are twenty John Browns in Merrimack Co. in 1800 - which one is mine?

    Marsha Rising works through these and many other examples of brick wall situations in this soon-to-be-classic reference book appropriate for genealogists of all levels.

    Order The Family Tree Problem Solver: Proven Methods for Scaling the Inevitable Brick Wall from http://www.amazon.com.


    Enjoy Nutshell Lectures at Home!

    Haven't been able to attend a Genealogy in a Nutshell lecture in Boston? We invite you to borrow an audio tape of a past lecture from the Circulating Library and receive guidance - at your convenience - from some of the top experts in the field of genealogy. There are currently fifty-seven Nutshell lectures available for loan through the Circulating Library.

    The following is a small sampling of the "Nutshell" sound cassette recordings available through the Circulating Library:

    "Beyond Clans & Tartans: Scottish Genealogical Research" with George F. Sanborn, Jr.
    "Caring for Your Treasured Books" with Deborah Rossi
    "Clues and Context: What Social History Can Tell You About Your Family History" with Jean Maguire
    "The Collections of the State Library of Massachusetts" with Eva Murphy
    "Death by Lightning: The Shocking Facts" with Julie Helen Otto
    "From Cordage to Cosmology: The Collections of the New Bedford Whaling Museum" with Michael P. Dyer

     

    A special type of search must be made in our online library catalog to find Nutshell lectures on tape. To search for a complete list of "Nutshell" sound cassette recordings, follow these steps:

    1. Click on the link to the NEHGS online catalog located in www.newenglandancestors.org.
    2. Click on the Advanced Search link, which will bring you to a page with six boxes containing drop-down lists.
    3. Choose "Document Type" for box #1 and "Series" for box #2 from the drop-down lists.
    4. Click on Search. This will bring you to a new page.
    5. Choose your specific Document Type - "Sound Cassette" - from the drop-down list and type the Series name - "Nutshell" - in the space provided below.
    6. Click the Search button to bring up the complete list.

    If you have any questions about using the Circulating Library, please call, toll-free, 1-888-296-3447, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time) or email bookloan@nehgs.org. To learn more about the Circulating Library and borrow books online, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/libraries/circulation/.

    Remember, you can now borrow up to three books, CDs, or cassettes by returnable pouch for the low cost of $9 per item!


     

     

    Upcoming Genealogy in a Nutshell Lectures at the NEHGS Library

    The Great Meadow: Husbandry in Colonial Concord with Dr. Brian Donahue on January 29, 2005

    Brandeis University professor and Meyerhoff Chair of American Environmental Studies, Brian Donahue, has made a substantial contribution toward the understanding of colonial life in New England in his book, The Great Meadow: Farmers and the Land in Colonial Concord. Please join him as he discusses his innovative research of the people and land in early Concord, Massachusetts.

    Getting the Most from NEHGS: CD-ROMs with Michael J. Leclerc on February 2 and 5, 2005

    From Barnstable to Watertown, and from Bibles to Irish newspapers, NEHGS has New England covered in its published CD-ROMs. The powerful search engine allows genealogists to conduct complex queries from the comprehensive databases. NEHGS director of special projects, Michael J. Leclerc, will explain how to get the most information from NEHGS CD-ROMs.

    All lectures take place at 10:15 a.m. at the NEHGS Library in Boston. Advance registration is not necessary. For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit our online Education Center at http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/main/. If you have questions, please call Member Services at 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday.


    Favorite - and Black Sheep - Ancestor Feedback

    Each week we ask the questions "Who is your favorite ancestor? Who is your favorite black sheep ancestor? Why?" If you would like to contribute information on your favorite and/or black sheep ancestor, please send your story in 300 words or less to Rod Moody at enews@nehgs.org. Thank you to all past and future contributors!

    My Black Sheep Ancestor
    by Elizabeth Lapointe of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    Andrew Barclay, a Scottish bookbinder in Boston, was a Loyalist in the Revolution and had to leave his bustling business in Cornhill for a place on a warship to Halifax, Nova Scotia, on Evacuation Day, March 17, 1776. He eventually went to New York, but evacuated that city at the end of April 1783 with the fall of the British, and went to live in Port Roseway (now Shelburne), Nova Scotia.

    It seems that his grandson, Andrew Barclay - the black sheep of the family - was born there in 1815, and was a bit restless. Although he was married with six children, ran a store in Shelburne, and worked in the customs office, life was not satisfactory for him, and he left about 1861, either for Boston, Massachusetts, or for the Caribbean.

    There is word that he worked for the Customs Office in Boston before going to the Caribbean, but no record has been found. Neither has any record been found in the Caribbean. (His son, Charles Robert Barclay, who came to Boston from Shelburne sometime in the late 1800s, did establish a business, the Barclay & Clements Co. Inc. on Atlantic Street in Boston. It sold Nova Scotia lobster and blueberries on consignment in Boston.) It has been reported in family tradition that Andrew was killed by the crew of the ship he was on in the Caribbean, and that he died at Santo Domingo on September 4, 1865.

    His wife, Mary Elizabeth Webster Morton, eventually left Nova Scotia with her daughter, Annie Louisa Haley, for California, where she died in 1907.

    The questions remain - why did Andrew Barclay leave his wife of ten years with six small children? Was he in Boston from 1861 to 1865? And why did he go to the Caribbean and die there in 1865?


     

    NEHGS Contact Information

    We strongly encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/emnehgs_enews_em_659_6.asp.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/levels/default.asp.

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