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  • 2004 Archive

  • Vol. 6, No. 8
    Whole #154
    February 20, 2004
    Edited by Rod D. Moody and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This free newsletter has been sent to NEHGS members and friends who have subscribed to it, or submitted their email addresses on various membership and sales department forms and website notices. NEHGS recognizes the importance of its members' privacy, and will not give away, sell or lease personal information. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the page and follow the instructions provided.

    © Copyright 2004, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Contents:

    • New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • New Arrivals in the NEHGS Online Book Store
    • NEHGS Event: Writing and Editing Your Family History
    • Take the New NEHGS Survey!
    • Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library
    • Careers at NEHGS
    From the Volunteer Coordinator
    New England Genealogical Events
    Historic Newspapers Online at TheOldenTimes.com
    • Tales from the Manuscript Collections
    • Favorite — and Black Sheep — Ancestor Feedback
    • NEHGS Contact Information

    New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Abstracts of Wills in Onondaga County, New York, 1796–1841

    In 1932 Minnie L.C. Coleman abstracted the names and dates from the original wills held at the surrogate's office in Syracuse, New York, and donated seven volumes of compiled material to NEHGS.

    The original text is part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections. NEHGS members may view it at our research library in Boston, call number NY 112 37.

     

     

    Search Abstracts of Wills in Onondaga County, New York, 1791-1841, at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/OnondagaAbs/

    The Diaries of the Rev. Thomas Cary of Newburyport, Massachusetts — 1781

    The Rev. Thomas Cary (1745–1808) was one of the many ministers along the Merrimack River who encouraged the patriotism of their parishioners during the Revolutionary War. He started his diary in Weston, Massachusetts, in 1762 and continued writing entries until 1806, two years before his death. This installment covers the year 1781.

    The diaries are part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections at the NEHGS Library, call number MSS 640.

    View the Diaries of the Rev. Thomas Cary at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/diary/.

     

    Records of the Proprietors of Weybridge, Vermont

    The town of Weybridge is in Addison County. These proprietors' records were compiled in 1942 and donated to NEHGS by Benjamin M. Hayward of Middlebury, Vermont.

    The original text is part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections. NEHGS members may view it at our research library in Boston, call number VT WEY 24.

     

     

    Search the Records of the Proprietors of Weybridge, Vermont at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/Weybridge_Town_VT/.

    Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections

    This week we have added a transcription of the following cemeteries in the towns of Amawalk and North Castle, in Westchester County, New York:

    Amawalk
    Quaker Cemetery, Hill Cemetery, Carpenter Cemetery

    North Castle
    Quaker Cemetery

     

    The original transcription is part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections. NEHGS members may view it at our research library in Boston. The call number is NY AMA 1.

    Search Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/cemeteries/.

    Alphabetical Index of the Births, Marriages and Deaths Recorded in Providence, Rhode Island — Volume 4

    Published by the city in twenty-five volumes from 1879 to 1945, this series provides names, dates, and the volume and page numbers of the statistic in the city records. We will continue to add volumes from this series to NewEnglandAncestors.org over time.

    The most recent addition to this database is Volume 4 - Births from 1851 to 1870.

    Search the Alphabetical Index of the Births, Marriages and Deaths Recorded in Providence, Rhode Island at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/providence/

     

     

     


     

    New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    Canada
    Microfilm Resources for Nova Scotia Research at NEHGS

    By Michael J. Leclerc

    While published sources are critical for success in genealogical research, it is also important to utilize original records and unpublished manuscript material as much as possible. This will guarantee the best chances for solving the puzzles in your family tree. The New England Historic Genealogical Society has worked for decades to obtain microfilms of much of this material for eastern Canada.

     

    Read the full article at www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=108.


    New Arrivals in the NEHGS Online Book Store

    The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Volume 7
    by Frank J. Doherty

    NEHGS is pleased to announce the publication of the newest volume of Frank Doherty's important series, The Settlers of the Beekman Patent. The Beekman Patent is an original land grant given to Col. Henry Beekman in 1697 by the English Crown and the second largest patent in present-day Dutchess County. Many emigrants from New England lived in and passed through the Beekman Patent on their way west. Others, such as the Palatines and Quakers (almost all from New England), were early settlers and remained for several generations or more. The area of study includes the towns of Beekman, Dover, LaGrange (part), Pawling (including Quaker Hill), and Union Vale.

    The first volume of The Settlers of the Beekman Patent series, published in 1990, included all early information available on the Patent. Subsequent volumes have included detailed family histories of the eighteenth-century residents of the Patent, many of which were drawn from sources previously unavailable to family historians, such as the original lease records of Henry Beekman and original daybooks and over sixty ledgers from early Dutchess County stores. Beginning with Volume 4 (1997), the author has included all reference to the Beekman Patent family names found in New York State Probate up through 1830-1840.

    Co-published by NEHGS and Frank Doherty, this seventh volume includes the following surnames: Hunter, Hurd, Hustis, Hutchins, Hyatt, Ingersoll, Ingraham, Inman, Irish, Irwin, Jenkins, Jennings, Jewell, Jewitt, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Judd, Kane, Keating, Keeler, Kees, Kelley-Kelly, Kellogg, Kemper, Kennedy, Kent, Kenyon, Ketcham, Kidney, Kinne, Kip, Kirby, Klein, Knapp, Knickerbocker, Kniffin, Knight, Knowlton, Knox, Kuhns, Ladue, Lake, Lamb, Lancaster, Lane, Langdon, Langford, Lanphere, Lapham, Lathrop, Latting, Lawrence, Layton, Leach, and Leavens.

    Previous volumes of The Settlers of the Beekman Patent series are being added to the databases of NewEnglandAncestors.org. NEHGS members can currently view Volume 1 in its entirety as well as over fifty family histories from Volume 2. New families are added monthly at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/beekman/?page_id=1088&seq_num=103.

    The Settlers of the Beekman Patent, Volume 7 is available from the NEHGS Online Store at www.newenglandancestors.org/marketplace/store/browse/product.asp?sku=722805475. The cost is $85 plus shipping and handling. For additional information about this series visit the author's website at www.beekmansettlers.com/.

    Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry, Volume 2: Reverend Francis Marbury and Five Generations of the Descendants Through Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson and Katherine (Marbury) Scott
    by Marston Watson

    This volume is the second in a projected multi-volume series dealing with Americans of royal and noble ancestry. Taking the colonial period as a point of departure, it focuses on two of Reverend Francis Marbury's daughters, Anne and Katherine, who immigrated with their husbands to the New World in the 1630s. It covers the first five generations of their descendants, carrying the various lines up to and beyond the Revolutionary War, into the sixth generation. The generational layout of the work follows a modified format of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, with citations for all five generations based exclusively on vital records and approved family histories.

    Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson, declared among some in her seventeenth-century world as a religious "heretic," defied many of the most powerful men in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, including Governor Thomas Dudley, in defense of her strong beliefs. She endured a "trial by fire," without benefit of a jury of her peers, in a highly charged court where these men challenged and mocked her views on religion. Her banishment from Salem and Boston drove her to a new colony called Rhode Island, which her mentor and friend Roger Williams co-founded.

    The book concludes with an every-name index of several thousand entries and a comprehensive bibliography. In addition, the author appended a "Lineage Society Index" with names of eligible ancestors in a number of hereditary societies, including the Colonial Clergy, Colonial Governors, Mayflower Descendants, and Revolutionary War Patriots.

    Order Royal Families: Americans of Royal and Noble Ancestry, Volume 2 at www.newenglandancestors.org/marketplace/store/browse/product.asp?sku=715765579. The cost is $40 plus shipping and handling.

    Epling/Eplin (1787–2003) Volume III: John (2) & Daniel (2) - Later Descendants
    by Robert Louis Massard and Debra Kay Cyprych

    This volume is the third in a multi-volume work of all of the descendants of John Paul Epling, who died in 1809 in Giles County, Virginia. This volume comprises generations seven and later of John2 and Daniel2.

    Order Epling/Eplin (1787-2003) Volume III at www.newenglandancestors.org/marketplace/store/browse/product.asp?sku=722801794. The cost is $39.95 plus shipping and handling.

     


    NEHGS Event: Writing and Editing Your Family History
    April 3, 2004, at the NEHGS Library

    Conducted by leading experts in the field, this special one-day program at our Boston headquarters will offer you constructive advice and guidance on how to prepare your own family history. Lectures include:

    Methods for Telling Your Family Story: Heritage Scrapbooks to DVDs
    by Maureen A. Taylor

    Longtime NEHGS contributor Maureen Taylor presents creative alternatives to publishing your family history, from heritage scrapbooks to DVDs. Make your family history an exciting project by using visuals, social history, and artistic tools.

    From Research Notes to Your Own Written Family Story
    Helen Schatvet Ullmann, CG, FASG

    With assistance from Register associate editor Helen Ullmann, the group will compose a family story, step by step, taking items from a file of research materials, and then illustrate it with a few photos and drawings. The discussion will include a tutorial on using "styles" in Word.

     

    Polishing Your Family Story: Finer Points of Style and Format
    Helen Schatvet Ullmann, CG, FASG

    Helen Ullmann will discuss some of the more detailed aspects of Register format as well as the use of footnotes (or endnotes), bibliographies, and indexing. Rewriting a few examples of typical problems with sentence structure will illustrate ways to simplify and enliven one's writing style.

    The program will conclude with a panel discussion featuring Taylor, Ullmann, NEHGS assistant executive director D. Brenton Simons, director of book acquisition Christopher Hartman, and Newbury Street Press consulting editor Barbara Mathews.

    For more information on this seminar, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/education/events/Default.asp?id=306, email tours@nehgs.org, or phone toll-free 888-286-3447.


    Take the New NEHGS Survey!

    We invite you to take the latest NEHGS survey and tell us what you think of this very publication — NEHGS eNews! We want to know what we can do to improve the newsletter, find out what is your favorite (and least favorite) part to read, and get your feedback on the size, delivery schedule, and formatting of the newsletter. Filling out our brief survey will help us to help you enjoy the NEHGS eNews even more!

    Take the eNews survey at www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=9969390750.


    Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library

    The 2004 "Genealogy in a Nutshell" series continues with:

    • "Urban Genealogy" by David Dearborn on Saturday, February 21

    • "The Wampanoags of Martha's Vineyard" by Richard A. Pierce on Wednesday, February 25

    • "Manuscripts: No Longer a Last Resort" by Timothy Salls on Wednesday, March 3 and Saturday, March 6

    All lectures take place at 10 a.m at the NEHGS Library in Boston. Advance registration is not necessary.

    For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/events/main/. If you have questions, please call Member Services at 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday.


    Careers at NEHGS

    NEHGS is currently seeking to fill the positions of Member Services Assistant (Framingham office) and Development Assistant (Boston office). For more information about these opportunities please visit our careers page at www.newenglandancestors.org/about/main/?page_id=640&attrib1=1&seq_num=7.


    From the Volunteer Coordinator

    I would like to welcome all the members who have recently become NEHGS volunteers. Your contributions to new projects, such as CD-ROM beta testing and recent website initiatives, are essential to their success. We need all of you and are grateful for your work.

    At the Framingham location the work is increasing as the Society embarks on two new projects. We are currently in need of volunteers to help our Membership team in Framingham with clerical tasks such as sorting cards, filling envelopes, and data entry. If you live within driving distance of the library at One Watson Place, Framingham, and are interested in contributing one morning or afternoon a week, please contact me at 617-226-1276 or via email at susanr@nehgs.org.

    For those volunteers who are able to come to Boston, we have a "brown bag" lunch planned for Wednesday, February 25th, at 12:30 p.m. at the NEHGS Library on Newbury Street. Microtext supervisor David Lambert will join the group to discuss the microtext materials — what is there, what is new, and what is coming. Volunteer "brown bag" lunches are a great opportunity for volunteers to get together, discuss their work, and meet with the volunteer coordinator. They are held on the last Wednesday of every other month. For those of you who live at a distance and are planning a trip to Boston, please contact me to find out when the next lunch is scheduled. We would love to meet you and have you join us.

    Susan Rosefsky
    NEHGS Volunteer Coordinator.


    Upcoming Genealogical Events in New England

    A Day to Discover Your Irish Roots
    Saturday, March 6, 2004

    The Irish Ancestral Research Association (TIARA) and The Irish Cultural Center (ICC) will hold a full-day seminar and workshop, "A Day to Discover Your Irish Roots," on Saturday, March 6, 2004. The seminar, which is open to all, will be held at the Irish Cultural Center in Canton, Massachusetts.

    Workshops include How to Search for your Irish Ancestors in North America; Birth, Marriage and Death Records in the U.S.; Birth, Marriage and Death Records in Ireland; Census Content, Clues, Cautions, & Comments; Are You Looking in the Right Location? Boundary Problems in Irish Research; Griffith's "Primary" Valuation of Ireland — What It Can Tell You; and Organizing Your Records. Attendees may also register to use the computer resources of the ICC/TIARA genealogy library.

    The registration fee for the seminar is $40 for TIARA members and $45 for non-members. The deadline for registration is March 1. To register for the seminar or for further infomation, visit the TIARA website at tiara.ie/iccroots.htm. Continental breakfast and a deli buffet lunch are included in the registration fee.

    The Irish Cultural Center is located at 200 New Boston Drive in Canton, Massachusetts. Their phone number is 781-821-8291.

    Genealogical Workshops at the Bristol Historical and Preservation Society
    February 21, 2004

    The Bristol Historical and Preservation Society in Bristol, Rhode Island, is offering the first in a series of genealogical workshops from 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon on February 21, 2004. This session will focus on using computers in genealogical research and offer tips on how to organize your research and present it to family and friends.

    The initial session will be followed by a four-week workshop series, which will be held on consecutive Saturdays between March 13 and April 3 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The workshops will give participants an in-depth look at such topics as locating and using various sources, organizational tools, research trips, technology and genealogy, and assembling and presenting one's research. Professional genealogist Jonathan D. Galli of the American Ancestry Association of Rhode Island will lead the workshops.

    The fee for the workshop on February 21 is $35. The registration fee for the entire four-part series is $125. Individual sessions are $50 each.

    For more information and to register, call 401-253-7223. All sessions will be at the Bristol Historical and Preservation Society Museum, 48 Court Street, Bristol, Rhode Island. Refreshments and program materials are included in the registration fee. Parking is readily available.


    Historic Newspapers Online at TheOldenTimes.com

    TheOldenTimes.com website (www.TheOldenTimes.com) consists of a collection of newspaper articles that date between 1792 and 1920. The site is quite easy to navigate. One way to explore its offerings is to go directly to the Index of Names, which includes a comprehensive linked list of all of the surnames found in the articles on the site. You can also run a search using keywords. The host notes that she has not yet, nor does she expect to, put together a comprehensive index of locations, although there is a linked index to each state (click on the Old News link from the home page). Site visitors are invited to subscribe to a free newsletter, which includes an index of locations named in articles added during the previous two weeks.

    It is also possible to browse through the site section by section. The sections include Old News, Deaths, Legal Notices, Births, Marriages, and Old Advertisements, to name a few. Under Old News you will find the state by state index mentioned earlier as well as International News, War News, Old River and Steamboat News, and Hotel Guest Lists. Some articles have been included just for fun. They fall under the following sections: Old Cartoons, Vintage Jokes & Humor, Original Vintage Recipes, and Newspaper Poetry. Perhaps your ancestor was one of these poets.

    Under War News you will find death notices of old soldiers, troop movements, regimental news, and notices of meetings and reunions. This section covers the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, the American Civil War, Spanish American War, World War I, and more. Old River and Steamboat News features articles on departures and arrivals, passenger news, shipping company news, cargos, river levels, and weather along some of the country's major rivers.

    Most of these specific sections feature an introduction at the top of the page, followed by brief summary "headlines" that are linked to a scanned image of the full article. You will find the newspaper's name, date and location with the image, as well as a link giving you the option to email the page to a friend.

    The collection of newspapers on this site is by no means comprehensive. In fact, according to the site's host, it is a rather arbitrary assortment. However, she also notes that articles from different papers from different states and time periods are being added regularly to open up a wider range of possibilities through which to search. She encourages visitors to check out surnames even when they appear in different locales from the ones in which their ancestors lived, because our ancestors were quite mobile. You might even find one in a hotel guest list or in society section of a newspaper, as visiting relatives were news.

    Take a few minutes to visit TheOldenTimes.com. The old news stories on this website can give you a sense of the times and places in which your ancestors lived, even if you don't find any articles written about them.


    Tales From the Manuscript Collections

    Due to production difficulties the special Tales from the Manuscript Collections feature on the George Lane scrapbooks promised in last week's eNews has been postponed until next week. We apologize for the delay.


    Favorite — and Black Sheep — Ancestor Feedback

    Each week we ask the questions "Who is your favorite ancestor? Who is your favorite black sheep ancestor? Why?" If you would like to contribute information on your favorite and/or black sheep ancestor, please send your story in 300 words or less to Rod Moody at enews@nehgs.org. Thank you to all past and future contributors!

    My Favorite Ancestor

    by John Guthrie of Medfield, Massachusetts

    One of my favorite ancestors is Jane Douglas, who was born about 1758. Her father was killed in the Battle of Québec and she was taken to Prince Edward Island at five years of age after her stepmother indicated that she did not want her. Her brother was sent to Europe. Jane was adopted on the island by the Warren Goldthrub family and went on to marry Thomas Mellish, a soldier. When he was killed, she married another soldier, Groho Greateau, who also was killed (and who I wish was an ancestor, because he surely would have qualified for the "All Name" Team). Her third husband was John Berhaut (who was my ancestor), with whom she had three children, the first of whom was born when Jane was about thirty-one (a relatively late age in those days).

    Let's review this woman's life one more time. Her mother died before Jane was five years old. Then her father was killed in battle, so she was an orphan at age five. And her stepmother didn't want her (which probably means that life with stepmother was not all that happy even before Jane's father was killed). Then, she and her brother were separated. Then she married a soldier who was killed in battle. So she married a second time, to another soldier who was (surprise) also killed. How do you suppose she survived all of that? How did she have the courage to take on a third husband (who was also a soldier, by the way)? And, how did he have the courage to marry her?



    NEHGS Contact Information

    We strongly encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=6.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/main/.

    If you have questions, comments, or suggestions about the enewsletter, please contact Rod Moody at enews@nehgs.org.

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888-296-3447

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