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  • 2004 Archive

  • Vol. 6, No. 7
    Whole #153
    February 13, 2004
    Edited by Rod D. Moody and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This free newsletter has been sent to NEHGS members and friends who have subscribed to it, or submitted their email addresses on various membership and sales department forms and website notices. NEHGS recognizes the importance of its members' privacy, and will not give away, sell or lease personal information. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the page and follow the instructions provided.

    © Copyright 2004, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

    Contents:

    • New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • From the Research Article Archive — African American Family History Resources at NEHGS
    • NEHGS Library Holiday Closure
    • Share Your NEHGS Research Library Success Story!
    • Last Chance to Register for Winter Research Getaway #1
    • Recent Circulating Library Acquisitions
    • Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library
    The Plymouth Colony Archive Project
    In Memoriam: Alan Britton Rice
    • Favorite — and Black Sheep — Ancestor Feedback
    • NEHGS Contact Information

    New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Vital Records of Blue Hill, Maine, 1763–1809

    The town of Blue Hill, in Hancock County, was established in 1789. These records were transcribed from the town books by Grace Limeburner, of North Brooksville, Maine, in 1941. They include vital records, marriage intentions prior to 1800, and a few cemetery inscriptions.

    The original text is part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections at the NEHGS Library, call number ME BLU 4.

     

    Search Vital Records of Blue Hill, Maine, 1763–1809, at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/bluehill_vt/

    The Great Migration Newsletter Online
    New Family Sketches for GMNL Subscribers

    Subscribers to the Great Migration Newsletter Online may now access ten new unpublished Great Migration sketches by Robert Charles Anderson. Sketches for the following individuals were added this week: Richard Adams,William Alford, Nathaniel Baker, Nicholas Baker, Samuel Bennett, Joseph Hull, John Humfrey, Thomas Lapham, John Lewis, and William Lord.

    Note: You must be logged in to NewEnglandAncestors.org and be an active subscriber to the Great Migration Newsletter Online to access these sketches.

    Subscribers to the Great Migration Newsletter Online may view the new sketches at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/gm_newsletter/Default.asp.

    To subscribe to the Great Migration Newsletter Online go to https://www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/gm_newsletter/subscribe/Default.asp.

     

    Marriage Registers of the Parish Church of All Saints, Maidstone, England

    These registers were transcribed by the Reverend J. Cave-Browne and published in 1901. The earliest register in the transcription is dated 1542 and from that point on the registers are continuous "with the exception of a break in the reign of Queen Mary [1553-58] and considerable irregularity during the Commonwealth [1649-59]." The transcriptions of registers go to 1754.

    In 1395 Archbishop of Canterbury William Courtenay gave the order to tear down the Anglo-Saxon St. Mary's Church, the base for a community of clergy serving seventeen villages from Detling to Goudhurst. A new collegiate church, called All Saints, was erected and was served by a college of priests just to the south of the church.

    The original text is available at the NEHGS Library, call number PR MAI 3.

     

    Search the Marriage Registers of the Parish Church of All Saints, Maidstone, England at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/ParishChurch_Marriages/.

    Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections

    This week we have added a transcription of the East Harwich Methodist Church Yard, East Harwich, Massachusetts

    The original manuscript is part of the R. Stanton Avery Collections. NEHGS members may view the original transcription at our research library in Boston. The call number is MS 70 EAS 191.

    Search Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/cemeteries/.

    Alphabetical Index of the Births, Marriages and Deaths Recorded in Providence, Rhode Island — Volume 3

    Published by the city in twenty-five volumes from 1879 to 1945, this series provides names, dates, and the volume and page numbers of the statistic in the city records. We will continue to add volumes from this series to NewEnglandAncestors.org over time.

    The most recent addition to this database is Volume 3 - Deaths from 1851 to 1870.

    Search the Alphabetical Index of the Births, Marriages and Deaths Recorded in Providence, Rhode Island — Volume 3 at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/providence/

     

     

     


     

    New Research Article on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    Massachusetts
    New Resources for Massachusetts Researchers

    By Maureen A. Taylor

    2003 was a good year for genealogists seeking their ancestors in Massachusetts. New books showed us how to find our roots in Boston, traced the genealogy of a house and its owners, and provided new insights into significant events in the state's history. Here's a select list of the latest publications.

     

    Read the full article at www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=103.


    From the Research Article Archive: African American Family History Resources at NEHGS

     

    In recognition of Black History Month we present an excerpt of an article first published on NewEnglandAncestors.org in May 2002. Beth Anne Bowers' "African American Family History Resources at NEHGS" highlights three interesting items relating to New England African American history in the R. Stanton Avery Collections at NEHGS. The following excerpt describes the Lane scrapbooks (MSS A 1900), an exceptional collection of rare images and writings documenting an African American settlement at Malaga Island, Maine, at the turn of the twentieth century. Watch for a special "Tales From the Manuscript Collections" feature next week on the Lane scrapbooks.

    The Lane Scrapbooks
    by Beth Anne Bower

    African American resources are often found within larger collections of New England family papers. Two extraordinary scrapbooks found in the NEHGS manuscript collections document the missionary work that Capt. George W. Lane (d. 1912) and his family provided to the people of Malaga Island, Maine. One scrapbook is a meticulously constructed and labeled account entitled “A History of parts of Capt. And Mrs. Lane’s and their daughter’s work among a neglected people of Malaga Island – Maine – and reference to other localities where the new Motor-Boat will make it easier for them to carry messages of love and happiness” (edited, compiled, and illustrated by Fred. H.C. Woolley, Sept. 1906 – Aug/Sept. 1907).

    The history of the African American settlement at Malaga Island, Maine, is a tale of a struggling but viable community treated dishonorably by government and commercial interests. Malaga Island is located near the mouth of the New Meadows River, close to Phippsburg, Maine. Although some sources suggest that Malaga was first settled in approximately 1720 by Will Black, an African frontiersman, it is certain that adjacent Horse Island was bought by former slave Benjamin Darling in 1794, who subsequently settled with others of African descent on Malaga Island. The African American community on Malaga was poor, as were many who depended on coastal Maine’s waters for subsistence in the nineteenth century. Although isolated, its residents participated in larger national events. William Johnson, who married Darling’s great-granddaughter, served in the 54th Massachusetts Colored Regiment in the Civil War.

    At the turn of the century, as Maine’s coast was developing into a vacation and tourist destination, mainlanders and government officials became concerned about “their ragtag island neighbors – some white, some black, many of mixed blood – living in make-do dwellings.” While Capt. Lane and his family worked to bring a school and religious instruction to this small community, the counties and state launched a campaign to remove and institutionalize the island residents. Ironically, the charitable attention the Malagites received may have indirectly led to the forcible removal of 45 people from Malaga I

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