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  • 2003 Archive

  • Vol. 5, No. 1
    Whole #94
    January 3, 2003
    Edited by Lynn Betlock and Rod Moody
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This free newsletter has been sent to NEHGS members and friends who have subscribed to it, or submitted their email addresses on various membership and sales department forms and website notices. NEHGS recognizes the importance of its members' privacy, and will not give away, sell or lease personal information. If you would like to unsubscribe, please click on the link at the bottom of the page and follow the instructions provided.

    © Copyright 2003, New England Historic Genealogical Society

    Contents:

    • New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • New Research Articles on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • Best of NEHGS Nexus Debuts on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    • Now Available! The Fairbanks House: A History of the Oldest Timber-Frame Building in New England
    • Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library
    • An Introduction to Using NewEnglandAncestors.org at NEHGS in Boston
    • The NEHGS Summer Conference 2003 in Boston — Sneak Peek #2
    • Experience the "Best of Germany" with NEHGS
    • Sources in the NEHGS Library for New England Families in Stanstead County, Québec, Part II
    • Research Guides at FamilySearch.org: A Not-To-Be-Overlooked Resource
    • National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts, Offers Genealogical Workshops
    • A Program on Middlesex County Newspapers
    • Favorite Ancestor Feedback
    • NEHGS Contact Information

    New Databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Arnold's Vital Records of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, 1642-1896

    The town of Rehoboth was formed in 1641 and orginally included the present Massachusetts towns of Seekonk and Attleboro as well as the present Rhode Island towns of Pawtucket, East Providence, Cumberland, and parts of Swansea and Barrington. The town kept its original area until 1667, when Swansea was incorporated, from which was broken off the present town of Barrington in 1717. The area became smaller still with the incorporation of Attleborough in 1694, and much later, in 1812, Seekonk. A section of Attleboro called Attleboro Gore was set off to Rhode Island in 1747 and became the town of Cumberland. This database includes records from all of these present-day towns except for Pawtucket and Seekonk, as the compiler wished to limit this work to a single volume. James N. Arnold, whose Rhode Island Vital Record, 1636-1850 volumes are also searchable on NewEnglandAncestors.org, compiled these records, which were published in 1897.

    Search Vital Records of Rehoboth, Massachusetts at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/vital_records_rehoboth/

    Vital Records of Greenwich, Connecticut

    The town of Greenwich, Connecticut was created by an act of the General Assembly passed in 1665. These vital records the town were abstracted by Spencer P. Mead in 1913. Mr. Mead was born in 1863 and was the author of Ye Historie of Greenwich (1911) and History and Genealogy of the Mead Family (1901), as well as several additional typescripts containing various records of Greenwich. These records begin in 1670 and end at 1847.

    Search Vital Records of Greenwich, Connecticut at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/vital_records_gr/

    Church Records of Greenwich, Connecticut

    The church records of Greenwich were also abstracted by Spencer P. Mead and consist of records from the following churches: First Congregational, Second Congregational, Stanwich Congregational, North Greenwich Congregational, Christ Episcopal, King Street Baptist, Round Hill Methodist Episcopal, and Stanwich Methodist Episcopal. These records begin in 1728 and end at 1909.

    Search Church Records of Greenwich, Connecticut at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/greenwichchurch/

    Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections

    This week we have added transcriptions from cemeteries in the towns of Rehoboth, Massachusetts (39 cemeteries); Grafton, New Hampshire (1); the Maine towns of Portland (3) and South Berwick (89); and the Connecticut towns of Greenwich (66) and Willington (1).

    Search Cemetery Transcriptions from the NEHGS Manuscript Collections at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/cemeteries/

    The Diaries of the Rev. Thomas Cary of Newburyport, Mass. — 1770

    Rev. Thomas Cary (1745–1808) was one of the ministers along the Merrimack River who encouraged the patriotism of parishioners during the Revolutionary War. He started his diary in Weston, Massachusetts, in 1762 and continued writing until 1806. This installment includes his observations from the year 1770.

    Search the Diaries of Rev. Thomas Cary at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/diary/

    Master Search

    Or master search all databases at
    www.newenglandancestors.org/research/database/all/default.asp.


    New Research Articles on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    Maine
    Pownalborough Courthouse Collection at the Maine Historical Society
    by Russell C. Farnham
    www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=102

    New York
    New York State Census Records
    by Marian S. Henry
    www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=107


    Best of NEHGS Nexus Debuts on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    From 1983 to 1998, the NEHGS Nexus newsletter presented a variety of research articles from genealogists and staff librarians, as well as Society events, genealogy news, queries, and reviews. We are pleased to announce the addition of selected articles from past issues of the Nexus to our website. This week we have added articles from the five issues that comprise Volume One, published in 1983-84. We will continue to add volumes in chronological order on a regular basis.

    Read Volume 1 of the Nexus at www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=9


    Now Available! The Fairbanks House: A History of the Oldest Timber-Frame Building in New England
    By Abbott Lowell Cummings
    Published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society

    This new book provides extraordinary detail about the history, architecture, and building and rebuilding of the Fairbanks House, built in 1641 in Dedham, Massachusetts. The book includes over fifty photographs and illustrations, spanning over 100 years. Written by Abbott Lowell Cummings, a noted architectural historian, antiquarian, and genealogist, the book features an introduction by Fairbanks Family in America board member Jonathan L. Fairbanks. "Abbott's insights . . . are brilliantly illuminated with his original and penetrating analysis," writes Jonathan Fairbanks. "As a writer, Abbott's descriptive powers are incomparable. In lucid detail he visually dissects a building and explains what changes happened and why they occurred over the full lifespan of the building."

    The book is available for $14.95 plus shipping and handling. Order online at www.newenglandancestors.org/marketplace/store/browse/product.asp?sku=299429826 or call toll-free 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday. If you have questions, please email sales@nehgs.org


    Upcoming "Genealogy in a Nutshell" Lectures at the NEHGS Library

    The 2003 "Genealogy in a Nutshell" series begins with:

    • "The Mill English of the 19th Century" by David Dearborn on Wednesday, January 8 and Saturday, January 11

    • "Establishing Genealogical Proof: When is Enough?" by Marshall Kirk on Wednesday, January 15 and Saturday, January 18

    • "Masonic and Fraternal Organization Records" by David Lambert on Wednesday, January 22 and Saturday, January 25

    All lectures take place at 10 a.m. Advance registration is not necessary.

    For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/events/main/. If you have questions, please call member services at 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday.



    An Introduction to Using NewEnglandAncestors.org at NEHGS in Boston
    January 8, 11:30 a.m.

    Learn how to use the NEHGS website to advance your research! In this free class, website administrator Darrin McGlinn will offer a step-by-step live demonstration of the Society's website, www.NewEnglandAncestors.org. This class gives participants the opportunity to explore the site in depth, ask questions, and become more comfortable using a constantly growing number of online databases and research tools.

    The next program will be held on January 8 at 11:30 a.m. in the education center at 101 Newbury Street, Boston. Advance registration is not required.

    For more information, please call 617-226-1209 or email dmcglinn@nehgs.org.


    The NEHGS Summer Conference 2003 in Boston — Sneak Peek #2
    New England Research in the Early 21st Century, July 11 & 12, 2003

    In the last newsletter we provided a few of the topics to be presented at the upcoming summer conference in Boston. In addition to a focus on states, we will also be offering sessions about area archives, helpful websites, and include some insights into how to write the ultimate family history.

    Ralph Crandall's topic (mentioned in the last eNews) on migration within New England will be followed by "Migration Out of New England" by NEHGS's own David Dearborn.

    Topics focusing on area archives and useful websites will include:

    • "Congregational Church Records: More or Less Than Meets the Eye?" with Dr. Harold Worthley, historian and librarian of the Congregational Library and Archives.

    • Ruth Wellner, head of the NEHGS Research Services Department, will familiarize conference attendees with Boston archives as she instructs participants to "Make Boston the Hub for Your New England Research."

    • Ann Lainhart, frequent contributor to New England Ancestors magazine and the NEHGS website, will present "Recent Findings in Mayflower Research."

    • Walter Hickey of the National Archives will give insights into using NARA in "Determining Immigrant Origins in Various Federal Records."

    Also:

    • "Finding Your Ancestors on NewEnglandAncestors.org" with Michael J. Leclerc
    • "Using the Family History Library Catalog" with Helen Ullmann
    • "Researching Your Québec Ancestors" with Michael J. Leclerc
    • "The New England Core in Print: The Best Reference Works and Compiled Genealogies" with Gary Boyd Roberts
    • "Writing a Family History: Making Your Genealogy a 'Good Read'" with Maureen A. Taylor
    • "Genealogical Writing: Style Guidelines and Practical Advice" with Henry B. Hoff

    The full conference agenda, detailed descriptions of each topic with speaker biographies, and registration information will be online shortly. NEHGS will also offer online registration for this conference. Please watch the enewsletter for further announcements about the conference. If you have any questions, please email summerconference@nehgs.org.


    Experience the "Best of Germany" with NEHGS
    May 13–23, 2003

    NEHGS members who want to experience the best of Germany in an intimate, personal way will be delighted at what's been arranged for 2003. The all-new "President's Tour" will visit some of the marquee attractions of Deutschland, plus some out of the way but equally delightful towns that the big tours leave out of their busy itineraries.

    Tour leaders Jim and Jenean Derheim, owners of "European Focus," believe in taking the back roads and avoiding the autobahn whenever possible. This adds a tremendous dimension to your trip. You'll be able to enjoy the countryside and the villages close up, and not from a distance from a fast-moving bus, like on larger tours. President of NEHGS David Kruger, his wife Jean, and assistant executive director D. Brenton Simons will be accompanying you on this new and exciting tour.

    Participants will enjoy a relaxed schedule that has been carefully designed as the exact opposite of the rush-rush-rush and the hustle required to keep up with bigger group tours. Experience the true magic of Germany with us; exceptionally comfortable rooms in luxury inns, all meals, drinks, sightseeing, and ground transportation are included.

    Those interested in personal genealogy research can arrange for assistance with us after the group tour has concluded. Come join us for the ultimate in private travel in Germany!

    For more information on this tour, visit www.newenglandancestors.org/events/main/ or contact Alena Tan, tours supervisor, at 1-888-286-3447 or tours@nehgs.org.


    Sources in the NEHGS Library for New England Families in Stanstead County, Québec, Part II
    By George F. Sanborn Jr., FASG, FSA (Scot.), Reference Librarian

    [This article is continued from eNews #93. To read the first part of this article, which covers the vital records from Stanstead County available at NEHGS, visit www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=694.]

    All experienced researchers know that genealogists cannot live by vital records alone, so in that spirit we have four other important resources for Stanstead County to offer. First among these are the notarial records for the Eastern Townships. As many will know, Québec follows the French legal system, and uses notaries to prepare and execute such documents as deeds, wills and probate records of all kinds, guardianships, marriage contracts, and the like.

    Most notaries were itinerant, which means that records pertaining to one's ancestor may not necessarily be recorded in the books of a notary who lived where the ancestor did. Consequently a very wide search is required to try to locate all relevant documents. The years of each notary's records correspond with the years he was actively serving as a notary, and his records were deposited with the local court upon his retirement. These were gathered, arranged, and microfilmed, and NEHGS acquired those pertaining to the Eastern Townships some years ago. These records are in English, if the parties were English-speaking, and in French if French-speaking, but there are few of the latter in the records covering the area in question.

    The frustrating part of using these records, besides finding all types of documents recorded together in chronological order as opposed to case files or dockets, is that few of the records are indexed, and when there is an index it is often to just one party named in the document and not the other(s). An attempt to make a composite index to all notarial records before 1800 is underway, but there seems to be no plan to extend such an index beyond that date. Consequently, many hours can be spent looking through the records of several possible notaries with no guarantee that an exhaustive search has ever been made. Moreover, the microfilming was done at a great reduction so that, even with a zoom lens, the patience of Job is required to pore over the tiny handwriting with many interlineations. It is great when one finds something because the records are usually very detailed: married or widowed women always appear under their maiden names and, in the case of deeds, a sort of chain of title is provided stating when the land was last bought or sold and the date, and the name and location of the notary who had prepared it, so that one can then turn to the records of that notary to carry the search a step farther back.

    Another important source that we have in our collection is the Lower Canada Land Petitions, on seventy-nine reels of microfilm, with eighteen reels containing an every-name index. The title is a slight misnomer, for the records contain much more than land papers, as such. There are petitions to the Government on various matters signed by large numbers of settlers in an area; depositions by people citing when, where, and how they had arrived in Québec; sketches of the boundary lines of property; and any number of other things of interest and use to a genealogist. These materials are not used nearly as much as they should be, and we urge researchers to try them on their next visit. Used in conjunction with List of Lands Granted by the Crown in the Province of Québec From 1763 to 31st December 1890, by Charles-Francois Langlois (1891), these records will provide a lot of information on your relatives. The Crown Grants list has the same information arranged two ways, both by town and county, and also alphabetically, giving the location, acreage, date of letters-patent and where they are recorded, as well as the names of the people, but beware that in the alphabetical section the names are grouped loosely by first letter of the surname only, so some searching is still required.

    We have all available, extant census records for Stanstead County, too, beginning with the 1825 census, and followed by those for 1842, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, and 1901. It is regrettable that the 1851 census for the Township of Stanstead, both the nominal and the agricultural schedules, appear to have been lost a long time ago.

    The Society now has microfilms of the Immigration and Naturalization Service border crossing records from 1895–1954, in two series [1895–1924; 1925–1954] which, from 1895–1907, recorded foreign-born people passing through Canada into the United States, and from 1907 onward included Canadian-born people, as well. These records are often referred to as the St. Alban's Border Crossing Records because they were under the jurisdiction of the St. Alban's office of the INS.

    And finally we have a relatively new published source of great value. The worthy Stanstead Historical Society, 535 Dufferin Street, Stanstead, Québec J0B 3E0 [telephone 819-876-7322; fax 819-876-7936; email: mccrcip@interlinx.qc.ca]

    mccrip@interlinx.qc.ca

    published in 2001 Schooling in the Clearings: Stanstead 1800–1850, by Kathleen H. Brown. This book provides a thorough study of the beginnings of education in Stanstead, with interesting maps showing the location of the early schoolhouses and settlers' land. However, the real treasure for genealogists are the lists of students attending each school (some with ages given), and the lists of settlers petitioning for schools to be established, as well as lists of school trustees, etc. While these lists, heavy with names, are not indexed, they have been rearranged into alphabetical order by the author to make searching easy. Most of the lists date from the 1820s and 1830s, but there are some earlier and later than that. Because of the nearly total absence of vital statistics for those early years, these lists, arranged by school and by term, are of enormous importance to finding names of children in the various families and learning in what part of town the families lived. 

    published in 2001 , by Kathleen H. Brown. This book provides a thorough study of the beginnings of education in Stanstead, with interesting maps showing the location of the early schoolhouses and settlers' land. However, the real treasure for genealogists are the lists of students attending each school (some with ages given), and the lists of settlers petitioning for schools to be established, as well as lists of school trustees, etc. While these lists, heavy with names, are not indexed, they have been rearranged into alphabetical order by the author to make searching easy. Most of the lists date from the 1820s and 1830s, but there are some earlier and later than that. Because of the nearly total absence of vital statistics for those early years, these lists, arranged by school and by term, are of enormous importance to finding names of children in the various families and learning in what part of town the families lived.

    published in 2001 , by Kathleen H. Brown. This book provides a thorough study of the beginnings of education in Stanstead, with interesting maps showing the location of the early schoolhouses and settlers' land. However, the real treasure for genealogists are the lists of students attending each school (some with ages given), and the lists of settlers petitioning for schools to be established, as well as lists of school trustees, etc. While these lists, heavy with names, are not indexed, they have been rearranged into alphabetical order by the author to make searching easy. Most of the lists date from the 1820s and 1830s, but there are some earlier and later than that. Because of the nearly total absence of vital statistics for those early years, these lists, arranged by school and by term, are of enormous importance to finding names of children in the various families and learning in what part of town the families lived.

     

    Several of us on the staff are interested in and do research in the Stanstead County area and will be happy to assist researchers here at the library with your Stanstead County questions.


    Research Guides at FamilySearch.org: A Not-To-Be-Overlooked Resource
    by Lynn Betlock

    You probably have used the FamilySearch.org website numerous times — to search the Family History Library catalog, to use the British, Canadian, or U.S. censuses, and to look for your ancestors in the Ancestral File and IGI databases, as well as take advantage of numerous other resources. But have you explored the research guides that the FamilySearch.org site has to offer?

    An enewsletter reader wrote in several weeks ago to ask whether we knew of a good source for a Latin genealogical word list. I put those terms into the search engine Google and the first listing that came up was for FamilySearch.org. Then I remembered the printed country, state, and language guides that the Family History Library has long made available to researchers. Those extremely useful guides are now all available online and the subject areas have expanded well beyond the guides that I remember from a few years ago. There is an amazing array of useful research tools on a number of different topics. I suggest you explore this section of the FamilySearch site yourself and see what you discover.

    If you visit www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/Rg/frameset_rhelps.asp, you can choose to search for "research helps" by four different criteria:

    • by place (such as a state, province, or country)

    • by title of the article (for instance, "Hamburg Passenger Lists" or "Dutch Word List")

    • by subject (such as "census" or "emigration")

    • by document type, which includes a variety of forms, letter-writing guides, maps, reference documents, research outlines, resource guides, step-by-step guides, and word lists

    If you visit a section called Research Guidance (www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rg.asp), and choose a place (state, province, or country), you can then select an event (birth, marriage, or death) and a date range. You will be provided with search strategy guidelines designed to help you find the records that might exist on your ancestor. The outline will include historical background information, a general overview of how to search for ancestors in that country, and might include information on topics such as military records, genealogical collections, land transactions, passenger lists and border crossings, funeral home records, and much more.

    I encourage all of you to delve into the FamilySearch website and investigate what research guides and tools may pertain to your areas of research. Happy hunting!


    National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts, Offers Genealogical Workshops

    The National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts, will offer twelve genealogical workshops during the winter of 2003.The workshops are introductory level, except as indicated. Participants will learn what they need to know in order to locate a record as well as what they might expect to find in the record.

    The workshops will be offered at the Regional Archives building, located at 380 Trapelo Road in Waltham, Massachusetts, according to the following schedule. Workshops marked with an asterisk (*) are followed by an optional behind-the-scenes tour of the archives.

    January 7, 2 p.m.* Census, Naturalization, & Passenger Lists
    January 16, 6:30 p.m. Census I, 1790–1870
    January 21, 2 p.m.* The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in Electronic Resources
    January 30, 6:30 p.m. Census II, 1880–1920
    February 4, 2 p.m.* Naturalization and Passenger Arrival Records (Intermediate)
    February 13, 6:30 p.m. Records Relating to African-American Research (All levels)
    February 18, 2 p.m.* Records Relating to African-American Research (All levels)
    February 27, 6:30 p.m. Census, Naturalization, & Passenger Lists
    March 4, 2 p.m.* Census III, 1930
    March 13, 6:30 p.m. Documenting Our Mothers (All levels)
    March 18, 2 p.m.* Documenting Our Mothers (All levels)
    March 27, 6:30 p.m. Census, Naturalization, & Passenger Lists

    Workshop and tour space is limited to twenty participants. Call 866-406-2379 for more details and to register. There is no fee.

    The Waltham branch of the National Archives is open Monday, Tuesday, and Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and the first and third Saturday of each month from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information, please visit www.archives.gov/facilities/ma/boston.html.


    A Program on Middlesex County Newspapers

    On Saturday, January 11 at 1:30 p.m., the Middlesex Chapter of Massachusetts Society of Genealogists will present a program entitled “The Resources of Middlesex County Newspapers for Genealogical and Historical Information” by Dennis J. Ahern. The lecture will be held at the Acton Memorial Library, 486 Main Street (Route 27), in Acton, Massachusetts. The program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

    Historian, genealogist, and lecturer Dennis J. Ahern will speak on the genealogical and historical information contained in many Middlesex County newspapers. This will include the usual vital records notices (births, deaths, and marriages) as well as more unusual stories of events such as sheriff’s sales, strayed or stolen horses, probate administrations, accidents, murders, crimes, fires, and even letters waiting to be picked up at the post office. Mr. Ahern will also describe the information available on his family website, which includes over 1,500 obituaries dating back to 1757 in Cork, and other news stories about the Aherns, both famous and infamous.

    For more information, please call 508-485-3275 or 617-527-1312. Visit the website of the Middlesex Chapter of Massachusetts Society of Genealogists at www.rootsweb.com/~masgi/msog/index.html.


    Favorite Ancestor Feedback

    We continue with reader submissions to the questions "Who is your favorite ancestor? Why?" If you would like to contribute information on your favorite ancestor, please send your story in 300 words or less to Lynn Betlock at enews@nehgs.org. Thank you to all past and future contributors!

    "He risked his own life"
    By Andrea G. Hajducko of Bensalem, Pennsylvania

    Deacon Aaron Chamberlain was born in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, in 1725 and married Thankful Adams, a distant cousin to President John Adams, in 1751. Aaron provided a host of services to the patriot cause during the American Revolution, but his activities actually began long before the shots rang out at Concord and Lexington. Aaron was one of three men from Chelmsford who drafted and signed a petition to King George III against the Stamp Act in 1765. He served as a juror in addition to being an integral member of the Committees of Correspondence, Safety, and Inspection through the early 1780s.

    However, especially as a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, there is one service he performed of which I am the proudest. As a minister, when the fighting began at Concord, he went there to attend to the wounded and dying patriots. During the course of his ministry, he himself was wounded as the battle went on. He risked his own life to minister to the needs of those patriots who fought to free our country from the tyranny of King George.

    My Favorite Ancestor
    by Marjorie Higley Brown of Stow, New York

    An ancestor I'd like to know is Catherine Chapin, daughter of Samuel Chapin. Catherine married her first husband, Nathaniel Bliss (b.1622) and had four children. I came from Nathaniel's line. Nathaniel died and Catherine married Thomas Gilbert and had four children with him. My husband, Albert Brown, came from Thomas's line. Thomas died in 1662 and once again, Catherine remarried (to Samuel Marshfield) and had four children.

    How I would love to talk to Catherine or her father Deacon Samuel Chapin! (Samuel Chapin's magnificent Puritan statue stands in Springfield, Massachusetts, where we can admire it.)

    "The one person I would love to visit with for just an hour"
    By Caryn Johnson of Virginia Beach, Virginia

    My favorite ancestor is Thomas Cobb, who was born in approximately 1762 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. My cousin and I have tried to find record of his birth but only have Thomas's daughter's application to the Daughters of the American Revolution, which states this supposed event. He's my favorite, because he offers contradiction in his actions and most importantly because he was a patriot. Did he really leave his Quaker family home in Nova Scotia to join the Revolutionary War? Was his wife Mrs. or Miss Lucy Smith, whom he married in Wiscasett, Lincoln County, Maine, on April 2, 1789? How did they meet? Their daughter stated she was his tenth child, born in 1809. I've found six of those children through research. Who are the rest?

    According to his daughter, he served at Valley Forge: "At the commencement of the war of the American Revolution my father at the age of seventeen joined the army, marched with it to West Point. They suffered much sometimes. Night would overtake them in a swamp so interminable that they would be obliged to stand in with their feet in the water. At first he served as Drummer Boy. He was in the command of General Knox. Was at Valley Forge when Lafayette visited the army and furnished them with blankets and shoes. He was trying to make himself shoes with the legs of his boots. He was mustered out at Yorktown."

    He is a hero to me — a patriot and the one person I would love to visit with for just an hour! I am his descendant through his daughter Mary Cobb, who married James Howlett. I am also the first descendant in this line to join the DAR as well as the Society of Descendants of Washington's Army at Valley Forge, for which I am honored.


    NEHGS Contact Information

    We strongly encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&seq_num=6.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/membership/main/.

    If you have questions, comment or suggestions about the enewsletter, please contact Lynn Betlock at enews@nehgs.org.

    published in 2001 , by Kathleen H. Brown. This book provides a thorough study of the beginnings of education in Stanstead, with interesting maps showing the location of the early schoolhouses and settlers' land. However, the real treasure for genealogists are the lists of students attending each school (some with ages given), and the lists of settlers petitioning for schools to be established, as well as lists of school trustees, etc. While these lists, heavy with names, are not indexed, they have been rearranged into alphabetical order by the author to make searching easy. Most of the lists date from the 1820s and 1830s, but there are some earlier and later than that. Because of the nearly total absence of vital statistics for those early years, these lists, arranged by school and by term, are of enormous importance to finding names of children in the various families and learning in what part of town the families lived.
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