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  • 2002 Archive

  • Vol. 4, No. 1
    Whole #57
    January 11, 2002
    Final Countdown to GENTECH 2002
    -Book Signings at the NEHGS Booth at GENTECH
    -Reading with Nancy Lusignan Schultz, Author of Fire & Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent
    -New Research Articles on NewEnglandAncestors.org
    -Gravestones and Cemeteries: A Genealogical Seminar
    -Genealogy 101 in Stamford, CT, February 22–23, 2002
    -Come Home to New England, February 24–March 3, 2002
    -Coming Soon in the Winter 2002 Issue of New England Ancestors . . .
    -Feedback Forum
    -"Warm and Cozy? Winter in New England" Lecture Series at Historic Deerfield
    -Deciphering Call Number Codes in the NEHGS Online Catalog
    -Construction at the American Antiquarian Society
    -Dreams of Freedom: Boston's Immigration Museum
    -Two Staff Positions Open at NEHGS

    Final Countdown to GENTECH 2002

    Two weeks from today the long-awaited GENTECH conference in Boston will be underway! The two-day conference (January 25 and 26) features over fifty genealogical lectures on topics ranging from genetics to geographic information systems, an exhibit hall full of vendors with the latest products, and a banquet talk by Dr. Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling book, The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry. Two of the program tracks are devoted to web resources, and include topics such as "NEHGS Online: Finding Your Family Electronically " by NEHGS director of electronic publications Michael J. Leclerc and "How to Cite Your Internet Sources" by Cyndi Howells.

    If you have not yet registered for the conference, there is still time! If you are going to mail your registration (GENTECH 2002, c/o NEHGS, 101 Newbury St., Boston, MA 02116), please plan to have it arrive before January 18. If you are going to fax (508-788-9500) or phone in (toll-free 1-888-296-3447) your registration, please do so by 5 p.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, January 22. Or you can register on-site at the Hynes Convention Center, located at 900 Boylston Street in Boston. Registration hours are:

    Thursday, January 24          10:30 a.m.– 8 p.m.
    Friday, January 25                7 a.m. – 6 p.m.
    Saturday, January 26           7 a.m. – 10 a.m.

    In addition, Librarians' Day, a pre-conference event, will take place on Thursday, January 24. The last day for registration for that event is Friday, January 18.

    There is also still time to make your hotel reservations. Two well-known Boston hotels are making a once in a lifetime hotel rate available to GENTECH attendees: $119 per night! In the heart of Boston's Back Bay, and directly across the street from the Hynes Convention Center, the Back Bay Hilton invites you to take advantage of this special rate and enjoy all the amenities this first-class hotel has to offer. On the south side of the Hynes Convention Center is the four-star Colonnade Hotel, offering elegantly appointed rooms in the European style. Both hotels are just minutes from the GENTECH conference.

    For reservations call:
    Hilton Back Bay 617-236-1100 (The special rate is good only through January 12.)
    Colonnade 617-424-7000 (The special rate is good only through January 19.)
    Please mention GENTECH to receive this special rate.

    For more information about GENTECH, please call 1-888-296-3447 from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday, or visit http://www.gentech.org/.


    Book Signings at the NEHGS Booth at GENTECH

    GENTECH conference attendees are invited to visit the NEHGS booth and meet seven different genealogical authors. Even if you are not registered for the conference, you are welcome to visit the NEHGS booth and the exhibit hall, which is free and open to the public.

    Friday, January 25

    10-10:30 Marcia Melnyk, author of Genealogist's Handbook for New England Research and The Weekend Genealogist: Time-Saving Techniques for Effective Research

    11:30-12 Ann Smith Lainhart, author of Digging for Genealogical Treasure in New England Town Records and State Census Records, and co-author of Inscriptions and Records of the Old Cemeteries of Boston and Deaths in the Town of Boston, 1700-1799.

    1:30-2 Ralph J. Crandall, executive director of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and author of Shaking Your Family Tree: A Basic Guide to Tracing Your Family's Genealogy

    1:30-3 Gary Boyd Roberts, senior research scholar at the New England Historic Genealogical Society and author of Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants and Notable Kin, volumes 1 and 2.

    3-3:30 Maureen Taylor, author of Preserving Your Family Photographs: How to Organize, Present, and Restore Your Precious Family Images, Uncovering Your Ancestry Through Family Photographs, and Through the Eyes of Your Ancestors.

    4:30-5 Tony Burroughs, author of Black Roots: A Beginner's Guide to Tracing the African American Family Tree

    Also Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, author of Organizing Your Family History Search, A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Female Ancestors, A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Immigrant and Ethnic Ancestors, and My Wild Irish Rose: The Life of Rose (Norris) (O'Connor) Fitzhugh and her mother Delia (Gordon) Norris (Signing time to be announced)

    Saturday, January 26

    11:30-12 Rhonda McClure, author of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Online Genealogy and The Genealogist's Computer Companion.

    1-2 Ralph J. Crandall, executive director of the New England Historic Genealogical Society and author of Shaking Your Family Tree: A Basic Guide to Tracing Your Family's Genealogy

    Also Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, author of Organizing Your Family History Search, A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Female Ancestors, A Genealogist's Guide to Discovering Your Immigrant and Ethnic Ancestors, and My Wild Irish Rose: The Life of Rose (Norris) (O'Connor) Fitzhugh and her mother Delia (Gordon) Norris (Signing time to be announced)


    If you have any questions about the NEHGS book signings at GENTECH, please contact Lynn Betlock at nehgs@nehgs.org.


    A Reading with Nancy Lusignan Schultz, Author of Fire & Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent

    Join us on Wednesday, January 16, 2002, at 6 p.m. when NEHGS welcomes Nancy Lusignan Shultz for a reading and discussion of her book, Fire & Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent. This special event will be held at NEHGS, 101 Newbury Street, in Boston.

    This critically-acclaimed non-fiction account of the 1834 destruction of the Ursuline convent in Charlestown, Massachusetts, by a mob of Protestant men was researched partially at the NEHGS library and reviewed in the holiday 2001 issue of New England Ancestors.

    This event is free and open to the public. Advance registration is not necessary. For more information about this event, call 1-888-286-3447, ext. 202, or email education@nehgs.org.


    New Research Articles on NewEnglandAncestors.org

    The most recent article on upstate New York is "Jemima Wilkenson, The First American-born Woman to Organize a Religious Group" by Marian Henry, PhD. It is located at /articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&page_id=669&attrib1=1&seq_num=107.

    NewEnglandAncestors.org also features two-brand new Royal Descents, Notable Kin, and Printed Sources columns by Gary Boyd Roberts. They are "Harvard, Its Presidents, and Kings" and "Notable Descendants of Henry and Margaret (----) Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, Parents of John Howland of the Mayflower." Both can be found at /articles/research/?page_id=659&attrib1=1&page_id=669&attrib1=1&seq_num=203.


    Gravestones and Cemeteries: A Genealogical Seminar

    Saturday, February 9, 2002, 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
    NEHGS, 101 Newbury Street, Boston

    Join us for series of dynamic lectures designed to teach researchers of all skill levels how to best utilize gravestone and cemetery resources. Whether you are searching for the grave of your ancestor or want to interpret information from gravestones, you are sure to benefit from this special program.

    Featured lectures are:

    • Utilizing Cemetery and Gravestone Resources at NEHGS,
    David Allen Lambert, NEHGS microtext librarian and author of the forthcoming publication, A Guide to Massachusetts Cemeteries (February 2002)

    • A New Look at Old Records: Searching for Your Ancestor's Gravestone,
    David C. Dearborn, FASG, NEHGS reference librarian

    • Understanding 17th–20th Century Gravestones,
    Laurel K. Gabel, head of the research department for The Association for Gravestone Studies and co-author of Gravestone Chronicles I and II.

    • Memories in Stone: Reading Cemetery Landscapes,
    Janet Heywood, Vice President of Interpretive Programs at Mount Auburn Cemetery

    Seminar fees are $90 for NEHGS members and $95 for non-members. Please note that early registration is recommended.

    For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit /events/main/. To register or inquire about our programs, please contact the Education Department, toll-free, at 1-888-286-3447, ext. 202, or email education@nehgs.org.


    Genealogy 101 in Stamford, CT, February 22–23, 2002

    Our Stamford program is becoming an annual tradition! This February, we are once again taking Genealogy 101 on the road. Genealogist Marcia D. Melnyk will be offering a new array of topics for the beginner and intermediate researcher on Saturday, February 23.

    • Oral History: Separating Fact from Fiction

    • Using Library Sources and Vital Records

    • Forms, Forms, and More Forms

    In addition, participants have the option to schedule a twenty minute private research consultation with Marcia Melnyk on either Friday, February 22, or Saturday, February 23. Program fees for NEHGS and Stamford Historical Society members are $50; for non-members, $55. The optional consultation fee is $20.

    For more details about NEHGS education events, please visit /events/main/. To register or inquire about our programs, please contact the Education Department, toll-free, at 1-888-286-3447, ext. 202, or email education@nehgs.org.


    Come Home to New England, February 24–March 3, 2002

    The perfect winter getaway awaits you here at the New England Historic Genealogical Society! Please join us for our "Come Home to New England" program, held from February 24 to March 3, 2002, at NEHGS in Boston. This intensive week-long program is ideal for those dedicated to hunting for their elusive ancestors. Morning lectures, private one-on-one research consultations with our esteemed staff, and guided assistance during the week are just some of the benefits of this classic program. This program is available either with lodging at the John Hancock Conference Center Hotel or at a special "commuter rate" that does not include lodging.

    For more details about NEHGS Education Events, please visit /events/main/. To register or inquire about our programs, please contact the Education Department, toll-free, at 1-888-286-3447, ext. 202, or send email to education@nehgs.org.


    Coming Soon in the Winter 2002 issue of New England Ancestors . . .

    • Laura Prescott Duffy explores the wealth of family history information that can be found in diaries and journals, and highlights several extraordinary examples from the R. Stanton Avery special collections department at NEHGS.

    • In a special focus on Massachusetts, Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs previews his new NEHGS publication, Seventeenth-Century Town Records of Scituate, Massachusetts, Volume 3; David Allen Lambert traces the work of Waldo Chamberlain Sprague and his "Genealogies of the Families of Braintree, Massachusetts," now on CD-ROM; and Ann S. Lainhart describes nineteenth-century records produced by Massachusetts institutions for the poor, mentally ill, chronically ill, and disabled.

    • Lynn Betlock examines the benefits of using Clarence Almon Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 on CD-ROM

    • David L. Greene concludes his reflections on genealogy and the future

    • Lynn Betlock describes the experiences of European emigrants at Ellis Island's counterpart across the Atlantic - the port of Hamburg.

    Also in this issue:

    • What's New: An interview with James W. and Paula Stuart Warren, co-authors of Your Guide to the Family History Library
    • The Computer Genealogist: Using Online Message Boards
    • New England Online: The Next Generation of the Register
    • Product Spotlight: The 1881 British Census on CD-ROM
    • Around New England: Building a Personal Core Reference Collection
    • Pilgrim Life: Leiden's Historic Monuments to be Preserved in New Town Plan
    • Manuscripts at NEHGS: The Faith Adams Griefen Papers

    And, as always, news of NEHGS and the world of genealogy, upcoming NEHGS programs and tours, new publications, and notices of family association events, genealogies in progress, genealogies recently published, and member queries.

    The winter issue of New England Ancestors will be mailed out to all NEHGS members next week; watch for it to arrive in your mailbox by the end of the month.

    Subscription to New England Ancestors is a benefit of NEHGS membership. If you are not a member, you may join online at /membership/main/, or call toll-free 1-888-296-3447.


    Feedback Forum

    Topic #7: Your Favorite Ancestor

    The Feedback Forum question for the spring issue of New England Ancestors is "Who is your favorite ancestor? Why?" Please limit your response to seventy-five words or less.

    To respond, please email feedback@nehgs.org, or write to "Feedback," New England Ancestors, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116-3007. Results will be published in an upcoming issue. Please include your name as you wish it to appear if selected for publication. We regret that we cannot respond to every letter. Letters will be edited for clarity and length. Personal statements or opinions made by respondents are not verified and do not reflect opinions or policies of NEHGS.


    "Warm and Cozy? Winter in New England" Lecture Series at Historic Deerfield

    Embrace the depths of a New England winter by attending Historic Deerfield's lecture series on the theme of how people kept warm in early America. This free three-part series will be held at the White Church Community Center on Memorial Street in Deerfield, Massachusetts. The lectures will be presented at 2 p.m. on the following three Sundays:

    January 27
    "Flowered and Feathered Fantasies: New England Early Wood Quilts"
    Speaker: Lynn Bassett, Costume Specialist, Connecticut Historical Society

    February 24
    "A Diet for Hard Work in the Cold: Meat and Potatoes in Early New England"
    Speaker: Sandra Oliver, Editor, Food History News

    March 24
    "The Heat of the Moment: Housewarming in Old New England"
    Speaker: Frank White, Curator of Mechanical Arts, Old Sturbridge Village

    For more information, please contact Historic Deerfield's Museum Information Line at 413-775-7214. You may visit the Historic Deerfield website at http://www.historic-deerfield.org/.


    Deciphering Call Number Codes in the NEHGS Online Catalog

    Anyone who has searched the NEHGS online catalog in the past several years will have come upon a large number of books (mainly genealogies and local histories) with the words "[Project Entry]" in the call number. This project reflects our efforts to make accessible those materials in our collection not yet cataloged into the Library of Congress (LC) system NEHGS has used since 1974. "[Project Entry]" is a transitional category; each item so designated will ultimately be cataloged into LC, with the detailed information possible under this system. Many of our pre-1974 items are receiving a "skeleton entry" prior to being given a full entry so that at least users will know they are in the library collection.

    Since 1987, we have been cataloging our books — both new acquisitions and those retroactively cataloged with LC call numbers — into the SYDNEY database, the basis of the online catalog which users access over the Internet. Since 1994 cataloging has been entered exclusively into this database, and no longer onto paper cards.

    The LC system is standard in large scholarly libraries, one of the reasons NEHGS adopted it in 1974. At this point, the majority of NEHGS books have been cataloged under the LC system, which uses letters to denote subject categories (e.g. CS for genealogy), numbers to subdivide those categories (e.g. CS71 for individual American families; CS90 for individual Canadian families; CS439 for individual English families; CS479 for individual Scottish families; etc.), and letters and dates to further divide these subdivisions (e.g. CS71 A2 1898 for the standard Henry Adams genealogy by A.N. Adams).

    The LC system replaces at least one older, "home-grown" cataloging system cobbled together by earlier generations of NEHGS librarians. You can tell one of these "old-class[ification]" call numbers for genealogies by its three elements, written in as many lines on the spine label:

    "G" [for "genealogy"] on the first line;
    the first three letters of the surname on the second; and
    a series of numbers on the third.

    To this array has been added the online tag "Project Entry," indicating that the book is in the process of being cataloged to modern standards. Histories for U.S. localities will be cataloged by state (CT, NY, MS [Mass.], VT, etc.) on the first line; a number (if for the whole state or an individual county) or the first three letters of a specific town, on the second; and a classifying number on the third. Both LC and "old-class" local histories are grouped first by works on the state as a whole; works on individual counties, A to Z by county name, then by works on individual localities, and A to Z by town name.

    "But wait!" you ask. "I found an item of interest which read '[Mss Project Entry].' Where will I find that?" This more recent project, along the same lines as the "[Project Entry]" used for books, endeavors to catalog our many "old-class" typescripts, mimeographs or bound manuscripts to the higher standards of modern cataloging. Formerly found on the open shelves with printed books, these often unique items are now housed in the manuscript department for safekeeping. The "[Mss Project Entry]" you see today thus represents an effort to ensure that the 1896 typescript you used in 1971 will be retrievable for your grandchildren decades from now — whether they use it online, or hold it in their hands here at 101 Newbury.

    To use the NEHGS library catalog online, visit /libraries/main/.

    Julie Helen Otto
    Reference Librarian


    Construction at the American Antiquarian Society

    The American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, is constructing a new collections storage area and upgrading the fire systems in their main building, Antiquarian Hall. Due to these construction projects, the American Antiquarian Society will be closed to the public from January 21, 2002, until about April 1, 2002. This means there will be no access to the collections, no weekly tours, and no public programs during this time period. For further information and construction updates, please call 508-755-5221 or visit http://www.americanantiquarian.org/.


    Dreams of Freedom: Boston's Immigration Museum

    GENTECH conference attendees (or those planning a future trip to Boston) might want to visit one of Boston's newest museums, Dreams of Freedom. Located along the historic Freedom Trail, Dreams of Freedom is a high tech multimedia exhibit depicting Boston's colorful history of immigration. Using a combination of cherished objects, vintage photos, holographic characters, and other special effects, Dreams of Freedom recreates the atmosphere, context, and emotion of the immigrant experience. Produced by the International Institute of Boston, Dreams of Freedom explores numerous personal stories of departure and arrival, prosperity and hardship, welcome and discrimination.

    The museum is located at One Milk Street, at the corner of Milk and Washington Streets, in downtown Boston. For more information call 617-338-6022 or visit http://www.dreamsoffreedom.org/.


    Two Staff Positions Open at NEHGS

    Website Administrator
    The Website Administrator is responsible for website content management and some technical support for NewEnglandAncestors.org. The Website Administrator will work with the customer service area to provide technical assistance to members using the NEHGS website as well as assist staff with internal technical problems. This position is the primary interface for technical issues between NEHGS staff and our contracted web developer. The Website Administrator will also work with the Electronic Publications Editor and all other departments to maintain a steady flow of updates and additions to content on the site as well as participate in the content scanning program. This position will manage all website functionality issues, including corrections and improvements to the site, to ensure member accessibility.

    This position requires strong customer service skills. Knowledge of HTML is highly important. Experience in data conversion is a plus. Experience with genealogical and/or historical resources and publications is desirable. Excellent verbal and written communication skills are required. The ability to work well in a fast-paced environment with multiple deadlines is a must. Project management experience is also a plus.

    This is a full-time position with benefits and reports to the Director of Electronic Publications. NEHGS is conveniently located in the Back Bay near major subway, train, and bus lines. No parking is available. Please send resume with salary history and cover letter to Director of Electronic Publications, NEHGS, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116-3007 or email mleclerc@nehgs.org.

    Digital Production Coordinator
    The Digital Production Coordinator will work with other support staff and volunteers to use scanners and optical character recognition software to convert materials in the NEHGS collections to electronic format for use in our electronic publications. This position will work with the Electronic Publications staff to create schedules for data conversion and regular uploading of content to our website NewEnglandAncestors.org. The Coordinator will also work with external vendors providing source materials for the Electronic Publications department. This position will also provide general office assistance to the Assistant Executive Director for Content Management and perform other duties as assigned.

    This position requires strong organizational skills. Experience in scanning and optical character recognition programs is a plus. The ideal candidate will also have experience with genealogical and/or historical resources and publications. Excellent verbal and written communication skills are required. The ability to work well in a fast-paced environment with multiple deadlines is a must. Project management experience is also a plus.

    This is a full-time position with benefits and reports to the Director of Electronic Publications. NEHGS is conveniently located in the Back Bay near major subway, train, and bus lines. No parking is available. Please send resume with salary history and cover letter to Director of Electronic Publications, NEHGS, 101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116-3007 or email mleclerc@nehgs.org.

New England Historic Genealogical Society
99 - 101 Newbury Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116, USA
888-296-3447

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