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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 16, No. 09
    Whole #624
    February 27, 2013
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

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    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * NEHGS Database News
    * Early Bird Deadline for NERGC Conference
    * London Research Destinations
    * Name Origins
    * The Weekly Genealogist Survey
    * Spotlight: McHenry County Genealogical Society, Illinois
    * Stories of Interest
    * Upcoming Education Programs
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    NEHGS Database News
    by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Christopher Carter, Digital Collections Coordinator

    The American Genealogist, vols. 78–82

    Newly updated on AmericanAncestors.org, The American Genealogist database now includes volumes 78 through 82, publication years 2003 to 2007. This update adds more than 33,000 name records to the database.

    The journal now known as The American Genealogist (TAG) has been published quarterly since 1923, and represents an important body of scholarly genealogical research covering the breadth of the United States (with an early preference for New England). The current TAG database covers volumes 9–82. Volumes 1–8, covering the years 1923–1932, are already available on AmericanAncestors.org under the name Families of Ancient New Haven.

    Armenian Immigrant Marriages in Massachusetts, 1880–1915

    This database of marriages of Armenian immigrants to Massachusetts was created by William Andreas Brown as a means for furthering Armenian heritage research in Massachusetts. The database contains marriage information for 3,565 individuals married in Massachusetts with surnames ending in "ian" or "yan."  The information is searchable by the individual's first and last name and by the father's first name, the mother's first and last name, and the spouse’s first and last name. All data was compiled from Massachusetts vital records data contained on AmericanAncestors.org and FamilySearch.org. Information in the "Notes" section was gathered from personal experience, Ancestry.com, and other genealogy websites.


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    Early Bird Deadline for NERGC Conference

    The New England Regional Genealogical Consortium Conference takes place in Manchester, New Hampshire from April 17–21, 2013. You can qualify for early bird registration rates — a savings of $25 off a full registration — if you sign up by the end of the day on Thursday, February 28. Registration information can be found here.

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    London Research Destinations
    by David Curtis Dearborn, FASG

    Are you ready to explore your British ancestry “across the pond”? Whether your ancestors arrived on the Mayflower or in early 20th-century steerage, London offers endless research opportunities. The Society of Genealogists and The National Archives will be the main focus of our upcoming NEHGS tour for good reason, and other nearby repositories also have a lot to offer.

    The Society of Genealogists (SoG) is the largest genealogical library in the U.K. The SoG has an enormous collection of published, transcribed, and filmed parish registers and local and family histories. In addition, the SoG also has U.K. census records, city directories, poll lists, wills and probate records, and many specialized collections. Users have access to the SoG’s rich collection of microfilmed and fiched source materials, including English, Welsh, Scottish, and some Irish census returns and indexes, indexes to England and Wales births, marriages, and deaths from 1837 onwards, and Scotland indexes to births, marriages, and deaths (1855–1920), plus earlier births and marriages (1553–1854). The library also has the Document Collections of family history research and original documents. The SoG holds published and transcribed local history records, including parish registers and gravestone inscriptions, for every county in the U.K. and thousands of parishes. Also available are family histories and one-name studies, multi-county will indexes, marriage licenses, and much more.

    The National Archives is located by the banks of the Thames just outside London in Kew. TNA’s holdings are vast, and include military records for all branches of the service (War Office and Admiralty) up to and including World War I, census schedules for England and Wales, wills and probate records (Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1383–1858), Death Duty registers, documents from the central courts of law from the 12th century onwards, including the Courts of Chancery, Exchequer, the Central Criminal Court and the Assizes, and records of the Home Office, Foreign Office and Colonial Office, plus much more.

    Until some time later in 2013, the London Family History Centre operated by the LDS Church, is located temporarily at TNA while their building is being refurbished. The London FHC has the largest collection of microfilmed genealogical records in the U.K. (Note that all are also available at the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City.) Among the highlights of the microfilmed collection are parish records from more than 9,500 parishes, non-conformist records, parish chest and poor law records, post-1858 record copy wills, Prerogative Court of York record copy wills, and probate records from hundreds of ecclesiastical courts (pre-1858).

    The London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) is the place to go if you have ancestors who lived in or around London itself. With more than 70 km of shelves, the LMA holdings include parish registers, electoral registers, land tax records, parish poor relief and Boards of Guardians records, and workhouse records. The Archives also contains records of marriage licenses and wills from the Diocese of London and wills from the Archdeaconry of Surrey. In addition, the LMA has a collection of photographs and prints arranged topographically and by subject, as well as maps and plans including parish maps and bomb damage maps.

    The British Library holds the India Office Records that include church records, wills and pension records of British and European residents of India between 1600 and 1947.

    The Principal Probate Registry, located in First Avenue House, contains probate records for England and Wales from 1858 to the present. (Note that the Family History Library has microfilmed these records for the period 1858–1925.)

    Of course, London has more repositories and resources than we can list here; this is just a sampling of London’s many genealogical offerings.

    The NEHGS London Research Tour will be held from May 19 to 26. NEHGS experts David Dearborn and Christopher Child and their counterparts at the SoG and TNA will help participants navigate the vast resources available in London. Daily activities will include expert lectures and tours. Then, from May 27-31, we will travel to the county record offices of Essex, Norfolk, and Suffolk with local experts. Join us for one or both tours and explore records only available in the U.K.!

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Genealogist

    AMYNTAS (m): The best known Amyntas (d. ca. 336 B.C.), son of Alexander the Great’s paternal uncle Perdikkas, was named for several earlier Kings of Macedonia, a fact which did not prevent his execution, probably at Pella, after the murder of Alexander’s father King Philip II. Amyntas Shaw was born at Raynham, Mass., 25 Sept. 1785 (Raynham VRs, p. 25), to Jonathan [Jr.] and Lydia (Gushee) Shaw, who must have been Macedonian history buffs — an earlier child was Permenio Callisthenes Shaw (b. 1779), named for two other anti-Alexander plotters.


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    The Weekly Genealogist Survey

    Last week’s survey asked about your relationship to New England. More than one answer could be selected. 4,118 people answered this survey. The results are:

    • 32%, I was born in New England.
    • 20%, I used to live in New England.
    • 27%, I currently live in New England.
    • 91%, One or more of my ancestors was born in New England.
    • 88%, One or more of my ancestors lived in New England.
    • 8%, I have never been to New England.
    • 3%, I have no New England ancestry.
    • 2%, I don't know if I have any New England ancestry.

    This week’s survey asks about your relationship to New York. Take the survey now!


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    Spotlight: McHenry County Genealogical Society, Illinois
    by Valerie Beaudrault, Assistant Editor

    McHenry County Genealogical Society, Illinois  

    McHenry County is located in northeast Illinois. Woodstock is the county seat. The McHenry County Genealogical Society has made a number of resources available on its website. Click on the Search Ancestors tab and choose from the drop down list to access them.

    St. John the Baptist Catholic Church Records
    Volume 1 of the Early Records of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, which covers the years 1852 to 1868, contains records from the registers of baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials. In 1841 German immigrants organized the church in Johnsburg, Illinois. A permanent priest was not appointed until 1852, when official recordkeeping began. The registers have been translated from ecclesiastical Latin. Select the database from the drop down list and scroll through the records, which are in chronological order. There is also an online surname index. Click on the link to view it.

    Newspaper Indexes

    The Herald
    The Herald newspaper began as the Nunda Herald and became the Crystal Lake Herald in 1908. There are two databases. The first is an index to death notices found in the newspaper from 1880 through 1979. (Issues from July 10, 1891, to July 14, 1893, and July 13, 1894, through July 4, 1895, are missing.) Clicking on the title link will allow you to access the records by selecting the first letter link of the deceased’s surname. This will open a new page with the alphabetical index. The fields in the database are name, age, death date, and information about the issue in which the notice was published. The second database is an index to marriage announcements for the same period; however, you must be a member of the McHenry County Genealogical Society to access the indexes after 1919. There are both brides and grooms indexes. Click on the title link to access the records by selecting the first letter link of the bride’s or groom’s surname.

    Woodstock Sentinel
    According to the website, the Woodstock Sentinel, which began publication in 1856, is the oldest newspaper being published in McHenry County. The database is an index to death notices that appeared in the newspaper between 1856 and 1894. Click on the first letter link of the deceased’s surname to open a new page with an alphabetical list. The data fields are surname, age, date of death, and date of issue.

    Marengo Republican
    This weekly newspaper began in 1867, then moved to Marengo a year later and took the name Marengo Republican. It ran until it was purchased in 1987. The index begins in 1872 and covers the remainder of the run. Click on the first letter link of the deceased’s surname to open a new page with an alphabetical list. The data fields are surname, age, date of death, and date of issue.

    McHenry Plaindealer
    The McHenry Plaindealer was first published in 1875. The database is an index to the death notices published from 1875 through 1880. A number of issues are missing between July 23, 1879 and May 12, 1880, and are not included in the index. Click on the first letter link of the deceased’s surname to open a new page with an alphabetical list. The data fields are surname, age, date of death, and date of issue.

    You may purchase copies of the newspaper notices from the McHenry County Historical Society for a small fee.

    In addition, the website includes other resources, such as every name indexes to the 1880 and 1930 federal censuses for McHenry County and names indexes to the MCIGS Connection Quarterly, the society’s publication.


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    Stories of Interest

    Getting Married in Israel: Why It So Often Means Hiring a Detective
    “Jews [in Israel] who want a marriage license must first prove they are Jewish in accordance with Orthodox tradition, which means they need to have been born to an uninterrupted line of Jewish mothers. Such a pedigree can be difficult to prove, especially for the children of Israel's largest immigrant community, the former denizens of the Soviet Union, many of whom spent years obscuring their Jewish roots to avoid discrimination.”

    Mournful, Angry Views of Ireland’s Famine
    A review of Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum, newly opened in Hamden, Connecticut.

    DNA Testing Helps with Family Histories
    An overview of what’s possible with today’s DNA technology
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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Ancestry Day with NEHGS
    Sheraton Boston Hotel, 39 Dalton St., Boston, Mass.
    Saturday, March 2, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

    Now just three days away! NEHGS and Ancestry.com are pleased to invite you to attend Ancestry Day with NEHGS on Saturday, March 2, 2013. This day-long program will offer classes and sessions to help you get the most out of your family history research. Whether you are new to genealogy or have been researching for many years, you can learn new techniques, methodologies, and make the most of the resources available at NEHGS and Ancestry.com.

    Details and registration. Onsite registration is available.

    New Visitor Welcome Tour
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston
    Wednesday, March 6, 10–10:30 a.m.

    This orientation and tour introduces you to the NEHGS research facility. Founded in 1845, NEHGS is the country’s oldest and largest non-profit genealogy library and archive. With more than 15 million artifacts, books, manuscripts, microfilms, journals, photographs, records, and expert staff to help you navigate it all, NEHGS provides the access you need to research your family history.

    Free and open to the public.


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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Ancestry Day with NEHGS
    Sheraton Boston Hotel, 39 Dalton St., Boston, Mass.
    Saturday, March 2, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

    Now just three days away! NEHGS and Ancestry.com are pleased to invite you to attend Ancestry Day with NEHGS on Saturday, March 2, 2013. This day-long program will offer classes and sessions to help you get the most out of your family history research. Whether you are new to genealogy or have been researching for many years, you can learn new techniques, methodologies, and make the most of the resources available at NEHGS and Ancestry.com.

    Details and registration. Onsite registration is available.

    New Visitor Welcome Tour
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston
    Wednesday, March 6, 10–10:30 a.m.

    This orientation and tour introduces you to the NEHGS research facility. Founded in 1845, NEHGS is the country’s oldest and largest non-profit genealogy library and archive. With more than 15 million artifacts, books, manuscripts, microfilms, journals, photographs, records, and expert staff to help you navigate it all, NEHGS provides the access you need to research your family history.


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    NEHGS Contact Information  

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    Copyright 2013, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116


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