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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 16, No. 31
    Whole #646
    July 31, 2013
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

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    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * Thirty-third IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy
    * Readers Respond: Civil War Ancestors
    * Name Origins
    * The Weekly Genealogist Survey
    * Spotlight: Dakota County Historical Society, Minnesota
    * Stories of Interest
    * NEHGS Semi-Annual Used Book Sale!
    * Upcoming Education Programs
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    Thirty-third IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy

    August 4–9, 2013
    Boston, Massachusetts

    The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) convention is the premier conference on Jewish genealogy. Hosted by IAJGS and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston, the conference will feature more than 300 lectures and workshops bringing together the best resources in Jewish genealogy from around the world, including exhibitions by NEHGS and a lecture by our Chief Genealogist, David Allen Lambert.

    Held in conjunction with the 33rd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, IAJGS Conference LIVE! will use the latest video-streaming technology to broadcast approximately 50 conference sessions online. To view the schedule of LIVE! Sessions and to register, visit www.live.iajgs2013.org.

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    Readers Respond: Civil War Ancestors
    by Lynn Betlock, Editor

    Two weeks ago, our survey about Civil War ancestors prompted a number of readers to write in with their ancestral stories. Here is a sampling:

    Johanna Becker of Newport, Rhode Island:
    Your survey didn’t ask if readers had an ancestor who deserted, although I suppose one could say they fought before they deserted. I have an ancestor from Georgia who fought for the Confederacy and died in a Union prison. Another ancestor from Tennessee fought for the Confederacy, deserted and took the Union oath of allegiance. A third ancestor, from Missouri, was with the Missouri militia and evidently walked away and never returned. He died in 1876. His wife applied for a Union pension about 1890 and it was denied.

    P. J. Evans of Chatsworth, California:
    I have more than one ancestor who fought in the Civil War, and a lot of people perched in my extended tree fought, on both sides, including at least two who died as prisoners. I have transcriptions of letters written by my great-grandfather, DeWitt Clinton Krone, and his older brother, DuQuesne H. Krone, who were from Macon County, Illinois, and served with the 41st Illinois Volunteer Infantry. I’ve been putting the letters online at http://pjevansgen.wordpress.com/ as the 150th anniversary of each entry occurs.

    Jean Nudd of Derry, New Hampshire:
    Your survey this week was of great interest to me. For years I thought none of my ancestors were Civil War soldiers. Several years ago, I discovered, quite by accident, that my paternal great-grandfather was indeed drafted into the Civil War from Northfield, New Hampshire. I even located him in an index to service and ordered the file from NARA in DC only to discover, upon receipt of the papers, that he was actually never in the war — he fled to Portsmouth rather than be drafted, where several years later he was captured and jailed for draft evasion. I’ve tried searching here at NARA for the U.S. Marshal record of his arrest but haven’t located anything to date. So I answered yes but by the time he was sent to his regiment after trial for draft evasion, the war was basically over.

    Bill Naughton of Woburn, Massachusetts:
    There are a number of national and local lineage and heritage societies for descendants of Civil War soldiers. Given that this is the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, descendants may be interested in membership in one. Lineage societies for descendants include: Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War; Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War; Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States; Sons of Confederate Veterans; and United Daughters of the Confederacy.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Staff Genealogist

    SENA (f): Often a nickname for ASENATH (or for any other name with middle or ending element -sen- [e.g. POLYXENA]. ASENATH is Old Testament Biblical, originally Egyptian ("And Pharaoh called Joseph’s name Zaphnath-paaneah; and he gave him to wife Asenath, daughter of Potipherah, priest of On —" Gen. 41:45), while POLYXENA (not mentioned by Homer) was a Trojan princess, betrothed or married to Achilles (accounts differ) and sacrificed by the victorious Greeks on his tomb "to appease his shade." (Clarence L. Barnhart, William D. Halsey et al., The New Century Cyclopedia of Names, 3 vols. [1954], 3:3218). Here the specific meaning of a name has given way to phonetic convenience, if you will. In such cases it may be important to seek names in other forms: a woman may be Asenath in her birth record, Sena in her marriage record — or Sena in her birth record and Polly X. at marriage.

    Sena Luddington, daughter of Titus and Merriam Luddington, was born July 20, 1773, in Wallingford, New Haven County, Connecticut. (Connecticut Vital Records to 1870, The Barbour Collection, AmericanAncestors.org.) In his 1815 will, Joseph Van Falkenburgh of Sharon, Schoharie County, New York, gave $200 to his daughter, Sena Van Falkenburgh. (Abstracts of Wills, Admins. and Guardianships in NY State, 1787–1835, AmericanAncestors.org.)

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    The Weekly Genealogist Survey

    Last week’s survey asked asked about royal connections. 4,137 people answered this survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:

    • 30%, Yes, I have one or more descents.
    • 26%, Yes, I have ancestors in common with members of royal families.
    • 43%, I don’t know if I have any royal descents or ancestors in common with members of royal families.
    • 8%, No, I have no royal descents.
    • 12%, No, I have no ancestors in common with members of royal families.

    This week’s survey asks about genealogical collaboration. Take the survey now!

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    Spotlight: Dakota County Historical Society, Minnesota
    by Valerie Beaudrault, Assistant Editor

    Dakota County Historical Society, Minnesota

    Dakota County is located in southeastern Minnesota and is bordered on the north by the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers. Its county seat is Hastings. The Dakota County Historical Society has made a number of databases available online.

    Click on the Home icon to enter the website. Click on the Research tab and select Online Resources to access the databases. To search a database, enter a last and/or first name and click Submit.

    Cemetery Records
    This database is drawn from the historical society’s cemetery files. Each town has a file, whether a cemetery is located there or not. The data fields in the search results include last name, first name, birth date, death date, cemetery, and note.

    Civil War and World War II Newspapers
    Although there are separate links to each set of newspapers, you can search both at the same time. The results are returned in two separate files. The data fields in the Civil War search results include last name, first name, town, status, company/regiment, date, year, and source. The data fields in the World War II search results include last name, first name, note, date, year, and newspaper.

    Obituaries
    The data fields in the obituary database search results are last name, first name, date, year, newspaper, and note. The notes field includes cause of death, age, probate information, and other dates on which the obituary appeared.

    Native American Census
    The Dakota County Native American Census databases are for the years 1900 and 1910. Enter a last and/or first name in the search boxes to begin. The data fields are last name, first name, age, birthplace, tribe, and town.

    Catholic Church Records
    The database serves as an index to the society’s collection of Dakota County Catholic church records. Some records from the Cathedral of St. Paul have also been included. The data fields in the search results include last name, first name, date, year note, church, and town.

    Census Name Search
    Use this database to search Dakota County Census for 1857, 1860, 1865, 1875, 1880, 1885, 1900, 1920, and 1930. Click on the last name of one of the records returned to view a detailed record for that individual, including last name, first name, age, birthplace, naturalized, occupation, town, range, page, and number in household. To view the basic records of all members of the household, click on the link to the right of the detailed record.

    Mortality Schedule, 1870 & 1900 Census
    Researchers can search the 1870 and 1900 federal census mortality schedules for Dakota County through this database. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name, date, year, note, and census year. The note field may include the cause of death.

    1915 South St. Paul City Directory
    The city directory indexed here is, for the most part, for South St. Paul. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name, occupation and, in many cases, place of employment, address, town, and page.

    Marriage and Divorce Records
    This database is an index to marriage and divorce records found in the historical society’s collection. The data fields include first and last name of the bride or groom, parents, first and last name of the spouse, date, year, type (marriage or divorce), and source. The case number for divorces is included in the Type field.


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    Stories of Interest

    Unsealed Birth Records Give Adoptees Peek at Past
    “Since a handful of states…have unsealed birth certificates, thousands of adoptees have claimed them and learned about their beginnings.’

    Old Family Bible Finally Comes Home to Horry County
    “A Bible believed to be about 100 years old has come home to Horry County, where Horry heritage buffs say it belongs.”

    Story of Long-Lost Sword Spanned Seven Decades
    A ceremonial sword, rescued from the ocean floor, is returned to the owner’s family 70 years later.

    Digging for an Earlier Freedom
    “Scholars are digging for archaeological evidence to support census records that suggest the oldest community of free African Americans lived in Talbot County, Maryland near the 1790s.”


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    NEHGS Semi-Annual Used Book Sale!

    The NEHGS Bookstore is happy to announce our semi-annual used and remaindered book sale. To receive a list of available titles along with instructions on how to order, send an email with "REMAINDERED" in the subject line to bookstore@nehgs.org. The list of books will not be available until after 12:00 p.m. EST on Friday, August 2.

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Visiting Boston this summer? Take advantage of our on-site orientations.

    New Visitor Welcome Tour
    99–101 Newbury St, Boston

    Saturday, August 3, 1:30–2:30 p.m.
    or
    Wednesday, September 4, 10:00–11:00 a.m.

    This free orientation and tour introduces you to the resources available at the NEHGS research facility, located at 99–101 Newbury Street in Boston.

    Using AmericanAncestors.org
    99–101 Newbury St, Boston, Mass.
    Wednesday, September 11, 10:00–11:00 a.m.

    The NEHGS website, AmericanAncestors.org, is full of great features, tools, resources, and content that highlights NEHGS’ national expertise in genealogy and family history. We now have more than 200 million searchable names covering New England, New York, and other areas of family research dating back to 1620. We invite you to attend this free lecture to learn more about this incredible online resource.

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    NEHGS Contact Information

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    Copyright 2013, New England Historic Genealogical Society
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