American Ancestors New England Historic Genealogical Society - Founded 1845 N.E. Historic Genealogical Society Seal View Your Shopping Cart Join NEHGS
Go
  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 16, No. 02
    Whole #617
    January 9, 2013
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

    **********************************

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * NEHGS Database News
    * Give to the NEHGS Annual Fund
    * A Note from a Reader: A Second Cousin to the Rescue
    * A Note from the Editor: A Featured Blog
    * Name Origins
    * The Weekly Genealogist Survey
    * Spotlight: Fayetteville Public Library, Arkansas
    * Stories of Interest
    * Save 20% off Five NEHGS Guidebooks!
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    **********************************

    NEHGS Database News
    by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Christopher Carter, Digital Collections Coordinator

    Rhode Island Roots – Volumes 6–10 (1980–1984)

    When Rhode Island Roots began publication in 1975, it served both as a newsletter for the newly formed Rhode Island Genealogical Society (RIGS) and as an aid to careful genealogical research. While it was short and unsophisticated in design, Roots was a serious publication assembled by people with considerable genealogical experience. This update includes volumes 6–10, publication years 1980–1984, and adds more than 20,000 records to this collection.

    Each issue of the quarterly journal, now 52 pages, features at least one compiled genealogy along with Bible records, transcriptions of original sources, book reviews, and studies of the genealogical implications of historical events. Indices of land and Notarial records and petitions to the General Assembly, transcriptions of estimates of ratable estate, gravestones, and early census records all provide invaluable clues to Rhode Island genealogy. The authors include well-known genealogists as well as RIGS members with stories of their own families to tell.

    We will continue to release volumes of this journal throughout the year.


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Give to the NEHGS Annual Fund

    By supporting the New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Annual Fund, you make an investment in your own family history research and its preservation. Annual Fund donations help to keep NEHGS membership fees down, enhance our website capabilities, make our educational programs possible, and provide our members with access to expert genealogists and researchers. Please consider a tax deductible gift. Give now!

    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    A Note from a Reader: A Second Cousin to the Rescue

    Weekly Genealogist reader Deborah Tasker Sena of New Jersey recently wrote to share her story of how reconnecting with a cousin because of genealogy led to significant assistance after Hurricane Sandy.  

    I know it is past the moment of covering Sandy-related stories, but I’d like to submit my story of how genealogy can uncover present-day family, not just lineal ancestors. While researching my King family history, I was inspired to try and find a second cousin who I knew as a child and hadn't seen in over forty years. (Our grandfathers were brothers who immigrated from Peldon, England, in the first decade of the twentieth century.) I located him and his wife three years ago, living not far from the town where I grew up in northern New Jersey. Other than getting together once for dinner, the relationship had just consisted of sharing emails. 

    I live on a New Jersey barrier island and, of course, evacuated ahead of Sandy. I initially stayed with a friend who lived in the same general area as my cousin — until her power/heat outage extended into a second week with temperatures dropping. My friend started to look into relocating. I had been using a cell phone to send email to update my friends and family on my situation. My newfound cousin and his wife, who had power, read my emails and invited me and my two pets to stay with them. I was at their home for twelve days, until I was able to return to my thankfully undamaged home the weekend before Thanksgiving. 


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    A Note from the Editor: A Featured Blog
    by Lynn Betlock, Editor

    Our latest blog profile features Forgotten New England, written by Ryan W. Owen. Here, Ryan introduces his blog:

    My blog, Forgotten New England, went live in September 2011, more than twenty years after I started researching my family history.  I started Forgotten New England to explore genealogy and regional history, but most of my entries explore the history of Lowell, Massachusetts, and my ancestors' relationship with the city. Five generations of my family were born in Lowell. I use Forgotten New England to document their stories and the minutiae that likely shaped and affected their lives. The research helps me to add leaves to the names, dates, and places forming the branches and limbs of my family tree.  

    Growing up, history, to me, meant names I recognized through municipal landmarks, faces I had encountered on currency, and places I had seen on maps. I, like my grade school peers, was generally uninterested in history. That changed in the sixth grade, when I created a family tree for class. Some classmates had interesting connections — including a cousinship with the teacher. In my family, I learned about ancestors named McNamara, Lannon, Hare, and Machado, which the world seemed to have forgotten. In the following years, I studied my ancestors’ photographs and learned their stories. I studied their eras, their neighborhoods, the personalities that fascinated them, and the gripes that irritated them. Forgotten New England is history that recreates the world of our ancestors, as they lived it, with all the dirt, sweat, worries, fears, dreams, and fascinations that consumed them.  

    My work on Forgotten New England led me to become a board member of the Lowell Historical Society. I also write Forgotten Billerica, a local history column that runs in the Billerica Minuteman twice monthly.


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Genealogist

    CAPITOLA (f): Capitola “Black Cap” Black is the spunky, cross-dressing heroine of The Hidden Hand: Or, Capitola the Madcap (serialized 1859, published in book form 1888) by Mrs. E.D.E.N. [Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte] Southworth (1819–1899). Searchable census indexes for 1860 and 1870 bring up 202 and 595 Capitolas respectively, suggesting the popularity of serial fiction in general, and of this novel in particular. Towns in California (www.capitola.net) and Texas (extinct) were named for this heroine.


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    The Weekly Genealogist Survey

    Last week’s survey asked about your genealogical resolutions for 2013. 3,138 people answered this survey. The results are:

    • 69%, I will organize research papers and files that I have accumulated.
    • 52%, I will write up some of my family history.
    • 43%, I will share genealogy stories with my family.
    • 10%, I will join a new society.
    • 28%, I will attend a conference or other genealogical education program.
    • 22%, I will take a research trip to a distant repository I have been meaning to visit.
    • 34%, I will take a research trip to a location where my ancestors lived.
    • 15%, I will take a DNA test for genealogical purposes.
    • 22%, I have other genealogical resolutions not listed above.
    • 10%, I am not making any genealogical resolutions this year.

    This week’s survey asks about what information you would find helpful in writing your family history. Take the survey now!


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Spotlight: Fayetteville Public Library, Arkansas
    by Valerie Beaudrault, Assistant Editor

    Fayetteville Public Library, Arkansas  

    Fayetteville is located in northwest Arkansas. It is the county seat of Washington County and home to the University of Arkansas. The Fayetteville Public Library has made resources from its Grace Keith Genealogical Collection available online. Click on the designated links in the center of the homepage to access them.

    Fayetteville Public Library Genealogy Database
    The Fayetteville Public Library genealogy database comprises three separate indexes. They are: Obituary Records, School Records, and Land Records. The Obituary Records index covers the period from 1868 through 2010. Click on the link to access the search page. Three newspapers have been indexed — Northwest Arkansas Times, Fayetteville Weekly Democrat, and Fayetteville Daily Democrat. The database can be searched by last name, first name, middle name/initial, date of birth, and date of death. The data fields are the same as the search fields plus newspaper title abbreviation and date. The School Records index covers the early years of the twentieth century. The database can be searched by surname and given name of the student and the surname and given name of the enroller. The data fields are surname and given name of the student, age/date of birth of the student, school name, district number, and the surname and given name of the enroller. The Land Records index covers the years 1830 through 1903. The database can be searched by grantor name (surname or full name), grantee name (surname or full name), and date. The data fields are grantor name, grantee name, claim type, date, and book and page number.

    Washington County Land Records
    Using this database, researchers can search Washington County land records for the period from 1834 to 1891. Select a search type — grantor or grantee — and enter a name in the search boxes. You can limit the search by document type — deeds, land, mortgages — or search all types at once. It is also possible to search the database by book and page numbers, if you know them. You can also choose to have the search results sorted by name or number. The data fields in the search results contain the document type, grantee’s name, grantor’s name, and book and page number. The book and page number field is an active link. Click on it to view the digitized document. Use the Return to Search Page link to return to the search results. Click on the volume and page number links at the bottom of the page to view the previous or next page in the volume.

    Washington County Marriage Record Search
    Washington County marriage records can be searched for the years 1845 to 1941. Select a search type — bride or groom — then enter a name in the search boxes. It is also possible to search the database by book and page numbers, if you know them. You can also choose to have the search results sorted by name or number. The data fields in the search results contain the bride’s full name, the groom’s full name, and the book letter and page number. The book and page field is an active link. Click on it to view the digitized document. Use the Return to Search Page link to return to the search results. Click on the volume and page links at the bottom of the page to view the previous or next page in the volume.


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Stories of Interest

    Struggling to Attract Visitors, Historic Houses May Face Day of Reckoning
    “We all know of Monticello and Mount Vernon, and they’re fabulous,” said Sarah Scarbrough, who is director of Virginia’s Executive Mansion. “But there are so many other homes in Virginia, and they’ve been struggling. The severity of the problem is alarming.”

    Photos Take Long Journey to Area
    How a box of mid-century photographs belonging to a Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, couple made its way from Seattle back to Ohio. 

    Secret Message Engraved by Irishman in Abraham Lincoln’s Watch
    “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History opened Abraham Lincoln’s pocket watch this past March, and discovered a secretly engraved message that turned an unsubstantiated family story into a confirmed historical event.”


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Save 20% off Five NEHGS Guidebooks!

    The Bookstore at NEHGS is offering 20% off on the following titles:

    To order any of these titles, please visit our website. After adding any of the above titles to your cart, simply enter the code NEHGS13 into the coupon field to receive your 20% discount.

    Please note that this discount cannot be combined with any other discounts, including the NEHGS member discount. Prices good through January 18, 2013, while supplies last. Prices do not include shipping. To order over the phone, please call the Bookstore at 1-888-296-3447.


    Return to Table of Contents

    **********************************

    Upcoming Education Programs

    Getting Started in Genealogy
    99-101 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass.
    Wednesdays, January 16, 23, 30, 6–8 p.m.

    How do you get started in genealogy? There are plenty of websites, libraries, and printed sources out there, but access to all that information can leave a beginner feeling overwhelmed. Let an NEHGS expert help you navigate the first steps in tracing your family history. Senior Researcher Rhonda R. McClure will share her knowledge and helpful strategies for beginning your family history journey in this three-part course.
    Tuition: $30 for full course (three sessions).
    Registration: Call 617-226-1226 or register online.

    Ancestry Day with NEHGS
    Sheraton Boston Hotel, 39 Dalton St., Boston, Mass.
    Saturday, March 2, 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

    NEHGS and Ancestry.com are pleased to invite you to attend Ancestry Day with NEHGS on Saturday, March 2, 2013. This day-long program will offer classes and sessions to help you get the most out of your family history research. Whether you are a beginner or have been researching for many years, you can learn new techniques, methodologies, and make the most of the resources available at NEHGS and Ancestry.com. Details and registration.


    Return to Table of Contents  

    **********************************

    NEHGS Contact Information  

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. Subscribe or view back issues of The Weekly Genealogist.

    Visit the Society on Facebook.

    The Weekly Genealogist, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. Visit us online for information about giving to NEHGS.

    For more information on the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit our website.

    Become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

    **********************************

    Copyright 2012, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116


    Return to Table of Contents

New England Historic Genealogical Society
99 - 101 Newbury Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116, USA
888-296-3447

© 2010 - 2014 New England Historic Genealogical Society