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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 15, No. 38
    Whole #601
    September 19, 2012
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

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    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * New Weekly Genealogist Format
    * NEHGS Database News
    * Now Available: Western Massachusetts Families in 1790
    * Early Registration Deadline Approaching for “NEHGS Comes West”
    * A Note from the Editor: Writing in Register Style
    * Name Origins
    * The Weekly Genealogist Survey
    * Spotlight: Long Beach Public Library, California
    * Stories of Interest
    * Still time to save on The Winthop Fleet
    * Classic Reprints
    * Upcoming Education Programs


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    New Weekly Genealogist Format

    We have received many emails about the newsletter’s new format and, based on those responses, we will be making some design changes next week. In the future we will be providing a more readable version of this newsletter. You can always read a formatted copy of The Weekly Genealogist on our website. Stay tuned!


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    NEHGS Database News
    by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator

    Charleston, S.C.: Inscriptions in Old Jewish Cemeteries, 1762–1903

    This collection of tombstone inscriptions from Jewish cemeteries in Charleston, South Carolina, was compiled by Rabbi Dr. Barnett A. Elzas in 1903. The inscriptions, from Coming St. Cemetery, Shearith Israel Cemetery, Hanover St. Cemetery, DaCosta Cemetery, and Lopez Cemetery, date from 1762 to 1903.


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    Now Available: Western Massachusetts Families in 1790

    In 1790 Western Massachusetts was a crossroads for New England families heading west into New York or north into Vermont. The transient nature of families living in this area, especially during the post-Revolutionary War years, presents certain genealogical challenges. Western Massachusetts Families in 1790 contains fifty genealogical sketches of heads of households and a listing of their children. Contributed by NEHGS members and edited by Helen Schatvet Ullmann, CG, FASG, these compiled sketches provide a major addition to the published research on this region. 6 x 9, paperback, 300 pp., $29.95 (member price $26.96)

    Order today!

    A database with additional sketches is also available.


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    Early Registration Deadline Approaching for “NEHGS Comes West”

    NEHGS Comes West
    Seminar in Berkeley, California Friday, October 26, 9 a.m.–8:30 p.m.
    andConsultations (by appointment, availability is limited) at the California Genealogical Society, Oakland
    Saturday, October 27, 9 a.m.–2 p.m.

    NEHGS is partnering with the California Genealogical Society for a full-day seminar and one-on-one consultations with Senior Researcher Rhonda R. McClure and Online Genealogist David Allen Lambert. Early bird registration rates for the Friday seminar end September 24, so sign up now!


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    A Note from the Editor: Writing in Register Style
    by Lynn Betlock: Editor

    Register style, a specific format for organizing genealogical data, was first introduced in the January 1870 Register. Editor Albert Harrison Hoyt explained “for the benefit of future contributors to the Register, and perhaps of those about to publish family-genealogies, we have arranged the Sherman Genealogy, a portion of which appears in this number of the Register, on a plan easily understood, and convenient for reference.” In the July 1883 Register, John Ward Dean reported on the ‘Register plan for genealogical records.’ “It has now been in use thirteen years and has given satisfaction. The Publishing Committee will continue to require genealogies intended for the Register to be arranged on this plan.”

    Modifications have been made to this style over the last 140+ years to account for changing tastes and technologies, but the format remains flexible, effective, and popular. In the Publications Department we regularly receive enquiries from people seeking guidelines for writing their genealogical information in Register style. We refer them to “Writing a Family Sketch in Register Style,” by Helen Schatvet Ullmann, CG, FASG, associate editor of the Register, which appeared in the summer 2007 issue of New England Ancestors and is available online. Here is an excerpt:

    “Whether you just want to write about your grandparents or compile a whole book, the basic building block is the family sketch, treating a couple and their children in an organized and interesting way.””

    “What is a family sketch? It’s just a story with a beginning, middle and end. The beginning is the first paragraph that contains the vital information about the parents — all of it. So, if the reader later wants to check back to see just when your great-grandmother married her second husband, it’s easy to find.

    “The middle is whatever you want, usually a biography in chronological order. It could include funny stories or a serious analysis distinguishing between your grandfather and another fellow who bore the same name.

    “At the end is a list of children with their vital data. You may have mentioned each child as he or she joined the family, married, or died, in the biography above, but it’s still important to have a straightforward list of children at the end. Children for whom there is a lot of information may be continued in their own sketches.”

    AmericanAncestors.org also offers “A Template and Suggestions for Writing in Register Style in Microsoft Word”, also by Helen Ullmann, and “A Guide to Basic Register Citation Formats”. In addition, the NEHGS book Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century: A Guide to Register Style and More, 2nd Edition is a useful resource.


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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Staff Genealogist

    GODOLPHIN (m): Hero of Emmeline, or The Orphan of the Castle (London, 1788), by Mrs. Charlotte Smith. Despite the machinations of the obsessed Delamere, Godolphin and Emmeline are married in the end. Note the use of an actual aristocratic English family name — that of the Godolphins, originally of Cornwall, prominent in English politics from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. The 1850 U.S. census shows three people with the given name Godolphin: Godolphin Alexander (b. about 1840) of Mercer County, Kentucky; Godolphin Angell (b. about 1825) of Scituate, Rhode Island; and Godolphin Leech (b. about 1842) of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.


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    The Weekly Genealogist Survey

    Last week’s survey asked how many print genealogical journals and magazines you subscribe to, including periodicals you receive as a benefit of membership in a genealogical organization.

    12%, I subscribe to no genealogical journals and magazines.
    41%, I subscribe to 1 to 2 genealogical journals and magazines.
    35%, I subscribe to 3 to 5 genealogical journals and magazines.
    10%, I subscribe to 6 to 9 genealogical journals and magazines.
    2%, I subscribe to over 10 genealogical journals and magazines.

    This week's survey asks how many paid genealogical websites you subscribe to. Take the survey now!


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    Long Beach Public Library, California

    Long Beach Public Library, California

    Long Beach is a city located in Los Angeles County, California. The Long Beach Public Library has made resources available on its website, including the LBPL Digital Archive, which contains Long Beach City directories, high school yearbooks, and photographs from the library’s Long Beach History Collection. Click on the LBPL Digital Archive link to access the resources. Next, choose a collection by clicking on an icon.

    Long Beach City Directories

    The city directory collection covers the period from 1899 through 1969. Click on the thumbnail of a directory to open a new screen that allows for page by page browsing. You can look through the volume by clicking on the “previous” and “next” page links, which are located on the right side of the page. Click on the thumbnail of the page in the box in the center of the webpage to zoom in. Click on the PDF icon in the box to download the entire directory, which you can then browse at your leisure. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the downloaded file.

    Long Beach High School Yearbooks

    The yearbook collection ranges from the 1900s through the 1950s. The high schools represented are David Starr Jordan, Polytechnic, and Woodrow Wilson. This collection is fully keyword and name searchable. The search box is in the upper right corner of each page. The browse function operates as described above in the city directories collection

    Long Beach Photos

    This collection, containing nearly 5,000 images, covers more than 100 years of the history of Long Beach. The collection can be searched by keywords and names, using the search box in the upper right corner of each page. You can also browse through the collection, which is organized alphabetically. Click on the thumbnail to open a new page with detailed information about the image. Click on the image to enlarge it. You can share, save, and print the images, as long as you credit the Long Beach Public Library. If you would like high resolution copies of images, you may purchase then from the library. Ordering information is available on the website.

    Long Beach History Index

    This database is an index to citations related to Long Beach history found in local newspapers. The newspapers include the Long Beach Press Telegram, the Press, the Press Telegram, and several weekly newspapers as well as selected magazine articles, pamphlets, and documents. You will find references for obituaries, events, some family histories, and more. You can search the index by keyword.

    You can also research an address in the city of Long Beach through the history index database. Click on the Research a Long Beach Address link, and read the instructions on how to conduct a search. You will need to enter keywords in the search box that include the street number and street name. Do not include words such as street, drive, avenue, boulevard, et.


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    Stories of Interest

    Richard III Dig: ‘Strong Evidence’ Bones Are Lost King
    “Archaeologists searching for the grave of Richard III have said ‘strong circumstantial evidence’ points to a skeleton being the lost king.”

    Is Georgia Padlocking Its Past by Closing Its Archives?
    An opinion piece by historian James C. Cobb of the University of Georgia discusses the recent decision to close the Georgia State Archives on November 1.

    Lost and Found: Discover a Black-And-White Era in Full Color
    In 1938 amateur photographer Charles Cushman began experimenting with color film, and he continued taking pictures until his death in 1972. Today, his 14,500 color images are housed at the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection at the Indiana University Archives. An NPR Lost and Found audio and image presentation tells the story.


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    Still time to save on The Winthop Fleet

    Order The Winthrop Fleet: Massachusetts Bay Company Immigrants to New England, 1629–1630 by Robert Charles Anderson by September 30, 2012 and pay only $54.95, a $10 savings off the list price! You can place an order here or by calling toll free at 1-888-296-3447. (Price does not include shipping.)


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    Classic Reprints

    Did you know that the NEHGS Book Store offers library-quality copies of over 10,000 rare and out-of-print books? Some titles ordered by recent customers include:

    • Index of Wills for New York County (New York City) from 1662 to 1850 (Item P5-NY0449H, $49.50)
    • Scandinavian Immigrants in New York, 1630–1674 (Item P5-NY0137H, $47.00)
    • Winders of America: John of New York 1674–5; Thomas of New Jersey 1703–34; John of Maryland 1665–98 (Item P4-S27774, $19.50)
    • Ancestry and Posterity of Joseph Davis (1773–1865) of Norway, New York, and His Wife, Elizabeth Hallock Davis (Item P4-H07701, $39.00)
    • Family History in the Line of Lt. Benjamin Ogden of New York (1735–1780) and His Wife, Rachel Westervelt (Item P4-H20421, $30.00)

    Search the entire Classic Reprints catalog.

    If you would like a list of FAQs and search tips for the Classic Reprints catalog, simply send an email with "Classic Reprints" in the subject line to sales@nehgs.org.


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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Stirring Up the Past: Food & Family in the NEHGS Archives
    99–101 Newbury St., Boston Wednesday, October 3, 6–7 p.m.
    Archivist Judy Lucey will share items from the NEHGS collection that focus on the importance of traditions surrounding food and family, including recipe books, menus, photographs, and rare account books and diaries which were also used to record family recipes. These documents, dating from the 17th to the 20th centuries, have been carefully preserved over time, first by families and now by NEHGS, and were often just as treasured as a family Bible or diary. Learn more about the treasures to be found in the NEHGS archives and the stories they tell. Free and open to the public. Please RSVP to education@nehgs.org or 617-226-1226.

    Salt Lake City Research Tour
    Sunday, October 28–Sunday, November 4
    Only a few spots remain on our 34th annual Salt Lake City Research Tour to the world-renowned Family History Library. Let the experts from NEHGS help you navigate the collections of the largest genealogical library in the world. In this intensive week of research, consultations, lectures, group meals, and other activities, you'll explore the resources of the Family History Library with support and guidance to help you make the most out of your visit.


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    NEHGS Contact Information  

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    For more information on the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit our website.

    Become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

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    Copyright 2012, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116


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888-296-3447

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