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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 15, No. 30 
    Whole #593
    July 25, 2012
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

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    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    NEHGS Database News
    Free Fun Friday at NEHGS
    Irish Genealogy Study Group 
    A Note from the Editor: House History Stories 
    Name Origins
    The Weekly Genealogist Survey
    Spotlight: Update on Historic Pittsburgh 
    Stories of Interest
    Pre-publication Sale on The Winthrop Fleet 
    Upcoming Education Programs
    NEHGS Contact Information

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    NEHGS Database News 
    by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Ryan Woods, Director of Internet Technology

    Portsmouth, N.H.: Abstracts from Portsmouth Newspapers, 1776–1800
    These Portsmouth abstracts were created from information gathered by NEHGS member Sean Furniss from the online collection America’s Historical Newspapers, Early American Newspapers Series 1, 1690–1876, and from newspapers reviewed at the Library of Congress and the Dartmouth College Library. Abstracts are grouped as Births, Deaths, Marriages, Probate, Advertisements, Notices, and News items.

    The information provided consists solely of abstracts. These abstracts are not exact transcriptions from the original newspapers. The spelling of names and other words in the abstracts are generally unchanged from the original spelling. Readers are encouraged to review the actual publications to obtain the exact text. Date, page, and column number citations are provided for each abstract.

    Portsmouth, NH: Records of the Overseers of the Poor, 1817–1838
    This compilation of abstracts is intended to provide information about the people who received goods and services from Portsmouth’s Overseers of the Poor. The collection does not include records for general payments made by or to the Overseers of the Poor that could not be associated with individual beneficiaries.

    These abstracts were created from the Family History Library microfilm copy of the Volume 10 transcriptions of the Portsmouth town records containing Vol. II, Expenses of Overseers of the Poor.


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    Free Fun Friday at NEHGS

    On Fridays throughout the summer, the Highland Street Foundation’s Free Fun Friday program invites the public to visit designated Massachusetts cultural attractions, from Boston to the Berkshires, for free. No registration or tickets are required. This Friday, July 27, NEHGS will open its doors to the public, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and provide library tours, a chance to meet with staff genealogists, and opportunities to explore the Society’s resources.  

    For more information, please contact education@nehgs.org.


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    Irish Genealogy Study Group

    The Irish Genealogy Study Group will meet on Saturday, July 28, between 9:30 and 12 in the Education Center (second floor) at NEHGS. This is an informal group gathered to talk about research problems and share solutions. Everyone is welcome to come and join in. Contact Mary Ellen Grogan for more information.


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    A Note from the Editor: House History Stories 
    by Lynn Betlock, Editor

    Last week’s survey on whether readers ever researched a house history prompted a number of readers to share their stories.

    Joan Schacht of Chesterfield, Missouri: 
    When my daughter purchased a house in St. Louis, I discovered that city records stated it was built in 1910, but city directories and Sanborn maps listed the lot as empty until 1951. The all-brick house appeared to be about 100 years old but the cinder block basement didn’t seem to fit. After spending six hours researching at city hall, I learned it was the house that was out of place. The house was moved from a location across the street onto a new foundation in 1950. Now I get to research the history of the house on its original plot, and I have already learned online that the 1950 sellers had purchased the house in 1912.

    Jane Potyondy of Contoocook, New Hampshire: 
    I remember doing a project in high school tracing the history of my 1830 home in Winchester, Massachusetts. We had in our possession the original floor plans, copies of the bills for labor costs and building supplies, and more. My mother and I went to the county courthouse in Cambridge where we pored through all the grantor/grantee books, tracing the ownership of the house. Paging through the old tomes, looking through the stacks . . . perhaps this was what triggered my interest in tracing the family. I had forgotten about this until you posed the question. Thanks for the memory!

    Gene Hullinghorst of Ann Arbor, Michigan: 
    The Collins C. Diboll Vieux Carré Digital Survey, a project of The Historic New Orleans Collection, allows users to search for the history, images, and prior owners of structures and lots in the French Quarter, from the French colonial period to the present. Unfortunately, my ancestors did not own a building in the Quarter but other family members did.

    Renee Pizzo of Scappose, Oregon: 
    We are only the fourth owners of our 1885 house in Columbia County, Oregon. The granddaughter of the second owner lives down the road, and was born in the house across the road from ours. Our road was even named after the original owner of the house. In 2010, when we purchased and refurbished the house, we found several interesting items — newspapers from 1928, shipping labels addressed to the second owner for linoleum shipped to the house, and a tintype of an unidentified young man — in the wall below a window. As time permits, I will continue my research.


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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Staff Genealogist

    PAUL (m): Despite the great debt both the Catholic and Protestant churches owe to St. Paul the Apostle (d. [69]), this name enjoyed surprisingly little currency in colonial New England, perhaps due to its Catholic and/or Anglican connotations. Paul Dudley (1675–1751) was the son of Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire Governor Joseph Dudley and his wife, Rebecca (Tyng). Paul Terrill, b. Woodbury, Conn. 1 Feb. 1721, was the son of Ezra and ____ Terrill (William Cothren, History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut 3:18).


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    The Weekly Genealogist Survey

    Last week’s survey asked whether you had researched a house history. The results are:

    49%, No, I have never researched a house history.
    32%, Yes, I have researched the history of at least one house that I did not live in.
    31%, Yes, I have researched the history of at least one house I lived in.

    This week's survey asks you the age of your current residence. Take the survey now!


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    Spotlight: Update on Historic Pittsburgh 
    by Valerie Beaudrault, Assistant Editor

    Update on Historic Pittsburgh

    The Historic Pittsburgh website, managed and hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's Digital Research Library, allows users to explore the archival and manuscript collections of a number of Pittsburgh-area cultural heritage institutions. Its collections have grown since I first profiled this site in 2005. They now include:

    Full-Text Collection: This collection contains over 1,200 works from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and includes the Historic Pittsburgh General Text Collection (general histories and historical overviews) and historic Pittsburgh city directories published between 1815 and 1945. Enter a keyword in the search box to execute a Quick Search of the collections. Click on the “More search options” link to open a new page with advanced options for searching the collections. With the basic search you can search the database for keywords found in the full text, author name, work’s title, or subject. Boolean, proximity, and bibliographic searches are also available. Your search history is recorded under the History tab. Click on the collection’s title link to open a new page with an option to browse through the complete list of books. The General Text collection can be browsed by author or by title. The City Directories collection can be browsed by date or by title.

    Maps Collection: There are five series of maps in the Historic Pittsburgh Maps collection. These include:

    • Darlington Digital Library Maps: More than seventy maps “created in the mid-18th through early-20th centuries [that] depict Pittsburgh or Allegheny County, including maps of Fort Pitt, plans of Pittsburgh, maps of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, Bird's-eye maps of Carnegie, Duquesne, Glassport, Homestead, and other western Pennsylvania cities.”
    • G. M. Hopkins Company Maps, 1872–1940: More than 1,800 map plates from forty-seven volumes are available in this collection. Originally published by the G. M. Hopkins Company, the maps cover the greater Pittsburgh area from 1872 to 1940 and show lot and block numbers, dimensions, street widths, and names of property owners, as well as churches, cemeteries, mills, schools, roads, and railroads. The collection is searchable by street name, building name, and building type. You can download map plate images as 200 dpi JPEG files for noncommercial and educational purposes. Reproductions of the map plates are available for purchase.
    • Warrantee Atlas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1914: Shows original land grants that settlers in what is now Allegheny County received from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Includes the name of the grantee, the date the land was warranted and surveyed, the property dimensions, and patent information. The atlas can be browsed by plate number or the last name of the original owner. You can download map plate images as 200 dpi JPEG files. Reproductions of the maps are available for purchase.

    Historic Pittsburgh Image Collections: Offers access to nearly 28,000 visual images from 59 collections held by eleven Pittsburgh-area institutions. Click on the Explore link to browse by theme, time, location, or collection. Themes include Pittsburgh at Work, Pittsburgh at Play, Pittsburgh at Home, and Pittsburgh Personalities. You can execute a quick search by entering a keyword in the search box on the Images main page. Click on the Search link to access the site’s advanced search capabilities. Keyword searches of the image database are limited to image title, creator, description date, subject, image identifier, or file name. Searches can be restricted to a particular collection or set of collections.

    Other resources include census schedules for Pittsburgh for 1850–1880 and Allegheny County for 1850–1870, an online chronology of Pittsburgh from 1717 through 2011, and brief film clips by a local filmmaker, Bill Beal, that document Pittsburgh life between 1968 and 1983.


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    Stories of Interest

    A Treasure Trove of Old Maps at Your Fingertips
    A Smithsonian blog reports that “the United States Geological Survey, headquartered in Reston, Virginia, is about to complete a massive project to digitize its cache of approximately 200,000 historic topographic maps.”

    Atlantan’s Search for Roots Leads to Germany, Czech Town
    A genealogist traces his obscure surname (and family history) back to Germany.

    G.I. [Grand Island] Women Travel Central Nebraska to Find Graves
    Two genealogy enthusiasts go “cemetery hopping” to fulfill requests from FindAGrave.com users.


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    Pre-publication Sale on The Winthrop Fleet

    The Bookstore at NEHGS announces a pre-order sale on the highly anticipated title, The Winthrop Fleet: Massachusetts Bay Company Immigrants to New England, 16291630, by Robert Charles Anderson.

    This new volume, due to be shipped in late August, describes the organization of the Winthrop Migration and the Winthrop Fleet in some detail, and provides detailed genealogical and biographical information on each of the more than two hundred families and individuals who came to New England in 1629 and 1630 as part of this movement. (These sketches have been updated and expanded since they first appeared in The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620–1633.) Each sketch begins with information on the English origin of the immigrant, when known, and the evidence for his or her arrival in 1629 or 1630. This is followed by biographical data, on education, officeholding and the like, and genea­logical data, including birth, death, marriage, and children. The sketches often include information on the place of each immigrant in the migra­tion process, whether as master or servant, and unusual and interesting features of their lives. 

    We are offering a pre-publication price of $54.95 for The Winthrop Fleet, which is $10 off the standard price of $64.95, until September 30. In addition, from now until July 31, we will also be offering 20% off most Great Migration titles. Order by using the links below or by calling 1-888-296-3447. To use the 20% discount online, enter the coupon code GMFLEET. (This coupon is not valid for already established special pricing, such as all seven volumes of The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 16341635, nor for the upcomingGreat Migration Newsletter, Volumes 120. Coupon cannot be combined with any other coupons/discounts, including the NEHGS member discount.) Prices do not include shipping. Please note that The Winthrop Fleet will not ship until late August but the other Great Migration titles will ship immediately. Offer good while supplies last.

    The Winthrop Fleet
    The Great Migration Begins: 1620–1633
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–1635, Volume AB
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–1635, Volume CF
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634­­–1635, Volume GH
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–1635, Volume IL
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–1635, Volume MP
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 16341635, Volume RS
    The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–1635, Volume T–Y
    The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony, 1620–1633
    The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 1–15
    The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 11–15


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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Getting Started in Genealogy
    99-101 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 
    Wednesdays, August 15, 29, and September 5, 6-8 p.m. 
    How do you get started in genealogy? There are plenty of websites, libraries, and printed sources out there, but access to all that information can leave a beginner feeling overwhelmed. Let an NEHGS expert help you navigate the first steps in tracing your family history. Senior Researcher Rhonda R. McClure will share her knowledge and helpful strategies for beginning your family history journey in this three-part course. Tuition: $30 for full course (three sessions). Register online.

    New Visitor Welcome Tour
    99-101 Newbury St., Boston, Mass.
    Saturday, August 4, 10-11 a.m.
    This orientation and tour introduces you to the resources available at the NEHGS research library. You will also have an opportunity to describe your research interests to one of our expert genealogists on staff, who can offer advice on how to proceed. Free.

    For more information on NEHGS programs, please visit the events page on AmericanAncestors.org.


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    NEHGS Contact Information

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    For more information on the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit our website.

    Become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

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    Copyright 2012, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    99–101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116


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888-296-3447

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