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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • The Weekly Genealogist
    Vol. 15, No. 21 
    Whole #584
    May 23, 2012
    Edited by Lynn Betlock, Jean Powers, and Valerie Beaudrault
    dailygenealogist@nehgs.org

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    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    New Lowell Genealogy Wins Two National Awards 
    NEHGS Database News 
    A Note from the Editor: Hands-on Genealogy 
    Name Origins
    This Week’s Survey
    Spotlight: Arizona and Colorado Cemetery Databases 
    Stories of Interest
    Classic Reprints 
    Upcoming Education Programs
    NEHGS Contact Information

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    New Lowell Genealogy Wins Two National Awards

    NEHGS is proud to announce that The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts (Newbury Street Press, 2011) has won the National Genealogical Society Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History Book and the Grand Prize in the 2012 Connecticut Society of Genealogists Literary Award Contest. Authors Scott Steward and Christopher Child were honored at the recent NGS Conference and the CSG Annual Meeting, and will be featured in the upcoming issue of Connecticut Genealogy Newsalongside a review of their book. 

    The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts represents the first full treatment of the Lowell family since Delmar R. Lowell’s 1899 genealogy and comprises more than one thousand entries for heads of families. Visit the NEHGS website to learn more about the book.


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    NEHGS Database News 
    by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Ryan Woods, Director of Internet Technology

    Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection) 

    Newly added to Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection): Derby (1665–1852), Suffield (1674–1850), Wallingford (1670–1850) and Woodbury (1674 –1850), birth, marriage, and death records. 

    Compiled from an original Lucius Barnes Barbour typescript in the NEHGS Special Collections, this database currently contains records for the towns of Derby, Fairfield, Farmington, Greenwich, Guilford, Haddam, Hartford, Killingworth, Lyme, Middletown, Milford, New London, Norwalk, Norwich, Saybrook, Simsbury, Stamford, Stratford, Stonington, Suffield, Wallingford, Wethersfield, Windsor, and Woodbury. 

    The complete Barbour collection contains information on 137 Connecticut towns. The remaining towns will be added to the database over the next year. The collection contains records of marriages, births, and deaths from the 1640s to about 1850; some towns include records through 1870. These records were collected, transcribed, and abstracted by Lucius Barnes Barbour (Connecticut Examiner of Public Records, 1911–1934) and his team of researchers between 1918 and 1928. 

    Mr. Barbour was a member of NEHGS from 1907 until his death in 1934. This set of typescripts was donated to NEHGS by Mr. Barbour's wife and children in 1938.


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    A Note from the Editor: Hands-on Genealogy 
    by Lynn Betlock, Editor

    Last weekend, I went shopping at a rummage sale sponsored by the Miles Memorial Hospital League in Damariscotta, Maine. My husband and kids and I found all kinds of treasures — books and a glass bowl and a doormat, to name a few items — and I happily paid for everything and headed to the car. My husband followed a few minutes later with a dusty old wooden trunk. I suppose he knew better than to get my opinion before he paid for it; I would have said no. Instead, I asked what he was going to do with it. He said he planned to "put stuff in it." 

    I didn’t have much more to say about the trunk until after we got home and he cleaned it. He came to report that there was a name on the trunk. Well, that got me interested. He couldn’t read the writing in the lid but I had no trouble deciphering “Rev. A. Zeller, 1518 Huey St, McKeesport, Pa.” Then I was off and typing.

    Using Google, I soon had a reference to the Rev. Albert Zeller of McKeesport in an online edition of Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania (1915). Rev. Zeller, a German Evangelical minister, was born in Württemberg, and immigrated in 1855 to become a missionary to German settlers in western Missouri. Later, over the course of his 53-year career, he served in Cleveland, Buffalo, and Rochester — also “filling many pulpits by invitation.” I wondered if he used the trunk as he traveled to his various speaking engagements. I continued to look for more information and, on Ancestry.com, I even found a submitted ancestral chart and group sheet of the family — and a photograph of Rev. Zeller

    Next, I tried to identify Rev. Zeller in each federal census year but found no connection to McKeesport or any part of Pennsylvania. I returned to the Western Pennsylvania history and wondered if I was off by a generation. Rev. Albert Zeller’s son, also named Albert Zeller, was born in Centerville, Illinois, in 1866. In 1893, he arrived in McKeesport, where he set up a medical practice, married Harriet Trimble, and had three children. “The family residence is at 1518 Huey St., where Dr. Zeller erected a fine brick house in 1909.”

    The trunk, though, clearly states “Rev.” A. Zeller — not “Dr.” My only theory is that Rev. Zeller may have visited his son in McKeesport — or perhaps even lived with him for a time — and labeled the trunk accordingly. And how did the trunk end up at the rummage sale in Mid-coast Maine? Perhaps a descendant of Rev. Zeller brought it north. I don’t suppose I’ll ever know anything further, although I’m sure the trunk’s journey would make a fascinating story if it could be told. Learning about Rev. Zeller has caused the trunk to acquire a lot more interest for me. I’ll make sure my husband puts some extra good "stuff" in it.


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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto, Staff Genealogist

    DIGHTON [DEIGHTON]: Three daughters of Dr. John Deighton (bur. St. Nicholas, Gloucester, England 19 May 1640) came to New England: Jane (Deighton) (Lugg) Negus (1609–living 1671) of Boston, Mass.; Frances (Deighton) Williams (1611–ca. 1705-6) of Taunton, Mass.; and Katherine (Deighton) (Hackburn) (Dudley) Allin (1614–1671) of Roxbury and Dedham, Mass. A fourth sister, Damaris Deighton (1616-post 1646/7), whom her father named executrix, remained in England and married Samuel Nicholls of Twyning, Gloucestershire, gent. A house at 99-103 Westgate Street, Gloucester, which she inherited is now the Gloucester Folk Museum; deeds (Gloucestershire Archives, John Deighton collection, catalog D381, noted at www.a2a.org.uk 10 Nov. 2004 and 22 May 2012), are housed at the Gloucester Archives. An abstract of Dr. Deighton’s will appears in TAG 9 (1932-33): 218-19.

    John and Hannah (Williams) Bird of Dorchester, Mass., named their daughter Dighton (Bird) Myrick (1687–1726) of Dorchester and Taunton, Mass., for her maternal grandmother Frances (Deighton) Williams. Dighton (Bird) Myrick was the mother (by husband Isaac Myrick/Merrick, Sr.) of Dighton (Myrick) Richmond (“late deceased” on 21 Feb. 1747, when her father wrote his will), also of Rebecca (Myrick) Hathaway (herself mother of a short-lived Dighton Hathaway [1756–1759]).

    Dighton (Myrick) Richmond, in her turn, was mother of Dighton (Richmond) Pratt (ca. 1747–Manchester, N.Y. 14 Jan. 1809) who in turn had a daughter, Dighton Pratt (b. Taunton, Mass. 17 April 1772), and of Mary (Richmond) Richmond (ca. 1737–1776), herself mother of Dighton (Richmond) Blore (ca. 1773-after 17 Sept. 1850) and grandmother of two granddaughters, each named Dighton Blore (1813–1817, and b. 1820). Mrs. Blore is found at Butternuts, Otsego Co., N.Y., as a widowed head-of-household in 1840.

    One suspects that the second Dighton Blore is the Dighton McClelland, 31, b. N.Y., in the Ward 10, Albany, N.Y., household of William McClelland, 32, b. Ireland (and their children Mary 15, Joseph 7, Elizabeth 6, William 4, and infant Richard) — and, in 1870, theDighton Lagrange, 50, with daughter Dighton Lagrange, 11, in the Ward 10, Albany household of Abram Lagrange (1850 U.S. Census, Albany Co., N.Y.).

    * An extended version of this article, with more Dightons, will be posted Tuesday, May 29, on our Daily Genealogist blog.


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    This Week's Survey

    Last week’s survey asked which English county record offices near London would be of the most interest to researchers. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:

    40%, None of the above. 
    27%, Essex
    22%, Kent
    21%, Suffolk
    18%, Devon
    17%, Norfolk
    16%, Somerset

    This week's survey asks if you have returned or received an ancestral possession. Take the survey now!


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    Spotlight: Arizona and Colorado Cemetery Databases 
    by Valerie Beaudrault, Assistant Editor

    Evergreen Cemetery, Bisbee, Arizona 

    The city of Bisbee is the county seat of Cochise County, Arizona. It is located in the southeastern part of the state, about eighty miles southeast of Tucson. The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum has made a cemetery database available on its website.

    Established in 1892, Evergreen Cemetery replaced the Old City Park Cemetery. Old City Park Cemetery was located upslope from the drinking water wells in Brewery Gulch and it was felt that this posed a health risk to Bisbee residents. Beginning in 1914, the people buried in the old cemetery were moved to Evergreen Cemetery. 

    There are just over 15,000 records in the database. The information in the Evergreen Cemetery database comes from the following sources: City of Bisbee ledgers recording sale of graves (1912–1999), Mrs. Lillian Bilyeu Banchi & Mr. John Banchi’s compilation of "mortuary, church, and sexton" records (originals not available, 1927–1964), and Southern Arizona Genealogical Society & Arizona Pioneer's Historical Society records (1884–1926).

    The cemetery database project is in its first phase. The second phase will include a physical inventory of the gravesites and information on the gravestones. Click on the link in the last paragraph to open the search page.

    The cemetery index is organized alphabetically by surname. The data fields are # (number sign), last name, first name, alternate spelling, burial date, death date, grave number, section, and plot location. You can sort the records by any of the column headers (data fields) by clicking on the header. First click the check box in the ‘#’ field; then click ‘View’ to access an individual’s detailed record. The data fields in the detailed record include surname, first name, middle name, alternate spelling, spouse name, burial date, death date, age at death, infant child of, gender, burial permit number, grave number, section, plot, receipt number, map page, original comments, moved, date moved, new grave number, new section, new plot, cause of death, and tombstone comments. Click the ‘Back’ button to return to the database. If you find an error in the database you may provide the correct information by clicking on the Request Change button.

    The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum also has placed an extensive collection of photographs on its website. These include historical and contemporary photographs of Bisbee, including some of the museum’s exhibits. Click on the Photo Archives link in the site’s contents list to view the captioned photographs.

    Lakeview Cemetery, Broomfield, Colorado

    The City and County of Broomfield own Lakeview Cemetery, an active cemetery incorporated in 1890. The City and County of Broomfield are located in central Colorado. The website contains an alphabetical listing of burials to 1955, a plat map of the cemetery, and a list of lot owners. The sources of the information for this index are copies of the original burial books housed at the Broomfield Depot Museum and a cemetery survey done in 1997. The data fields in the cemetery index are name, age, date of death, block, lot, and comments. The data fields in the list of plot owners, which is likely incomplete, are name, block, and lot.


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    Stories of Interest

    War of 1812: Blood Ties
    DNA testing on blood on a “War of 1812 red militia coat — on permanent display at the Hamilton [Ontario] Military Museum — is going to be part of a fascinating DNA analysis to connect [Titus Geer] Simons to relatives living today.”

    Turn Your Life into an Infinite, Living Memoir
    This article offers useful guidelines for writing up your own life story.

    Family's ancestors declared free
    On Good Friday, April 6, 2012, Wayne County, W.Va., Circuit Court Judge Darrell Pratt "issued a decree recognizing that Harrison Polley and three siblings had been freed in the mid-nineteenth century."


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    Classic Reprints

    Did you know that the NEHGS Book Store offers library-quality copies of over 10,000 rare and out-of-print books? Some titles ordered by recent customers include:

    • Vital Records of Norwich Connecticut 1659–1848 (Item P2-6520700, $175.00)
    • History of Norwich, Connecticut (Item P2-6520600, $117.00)
    • First Church of Christ, New London, Connecticut (Item P2-6520300, $88.00)
    • History of the Town of Goshen, Connecticut (Item P2-6497500, $94.00)
    • Thomas Barnes (c.1615–1689/90) of Hartford and Farmington, Connecticut (Item P4-H01755, $29.00)

    Search the entire Classic Reprints catalog.

    If you would like a list of FAQs and search tips for the Classic Reprints catalog, simply send an email with "Classic Reprints" in the subject line to sales@nehgs.org.


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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Insider’s Tour of USS Constitution
    USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown, Mass.
    Thursday, May 31, 5:30–7:30 p.m.

    Join the crew at the USS Constitution Museum for a private, after hours tour of the USSConstitution, “Old Ironsides,” the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world.

    Led by Margherita Desy, historian with the Naval History & Heritage Command Detachment Boston, USS Constitution, visitors will explore the ship. After the tour, take a behind-the-scenes look at the museum’s collections, archives, and exhibits. Museum president Anne Grimes Rand will share plans for the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. Guests should meet at the USS Constitution Museum and bring a valid photo ID for access to the ship. Refreshments will be served. This event is free for guests of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. To attend, please RSVP by May 25 at rsvp@ussconstitutionmuseum.org or 617-426-1812, ext. 167.

    The Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife: The Irish in New England
    Historic Deerfield, Deerfield, Mass.
    June 22–24

    The Irish in New England is a three-day conference on the Irish presence in New England, from the early eighteenth century to the middle of the twentieth. Beginning with issues of immigration and the Irish diaspora, the program addresses the work typically associated with foreign-born Irish families: railroad building, domestic service, and groundskeeping. Other sessions deal with Irish-born merchants and mariners; Revolutionary-period Irish loyalty and law enforcement; Irish suffrage; and folklore and memory. The conference concludes with a session on the growth of Irish neighborhoods and charitable societies, and the work of Irish craftsmen, artists, and entertainers. 

    An optional program on Irish genealogy will be offered on Friday afternoon, 2–4:30 p.m., by Marie Daly and Judith Lucey of NEHGS, entitled, “A Virtual Way to Tipperary: Researching Irish Ancestors Online.”

    More information can be accessed by visiting the events page on AmericanAncestors.org.


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    NEHGS Contact Information

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