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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 11, No. 24
    Whole #431
    June 17, 2009
    Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * MGC Annual Seminar and Meeting
    * Holiday Closure
    * Research Recommendations: Historical Currency Conversion
    * Name Origins
    * New On NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * Spotlight: African-American Resources, Virginia
    * Stories of Interest
    * Question of the Day
    * Free Shipping on Great Migration Titles
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information

     

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    MGC Annual Seminar and Meeting

    The Massachusetts Genealogical Council annual seminar and meeting will be held on Saturday, July 18, 2009, at the LaCava Center at Bentley University in Waltham, MA. The featured speaker will be Paula Stuart-Warren, a national known genealogy and historical researcher. Ms. Stuart-Warren is a course coordinator for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, and has lectured at NGS and FGS conferences since 1993. The day will feature special guest Vincent J. Cannato, PhD, associate professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Dr. Connato will discuss his new book, American Passage — The History of Ellis Island. NEHGS staff members Christopher C. Child and D. Joshua Taylor will also be presenting at the seminar.

    For more information, or to register for the seminar, visit http://www.massgencouncil.org/.

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    Holiday Closure

    The Society's office will be closed in celebration of the Independance Day holiday. The administrative offices will be closed on Friday, July 3. The research library will be open on Friday, July 3, and closed on Saturday, July 4.

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    Research Recommendations: Historical Currency Conversion
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    When researchers are dealing with old land and estate records, I am often asked “How much would that be worth today?” While Yahoo and other currency calculators are great at modern money, they often do not include the ability to convert values through time.

    One great website is called “Historical Currency Conversions.” This website, available at http://futureboy.homeip.net/fsp/dollar.fsp, is capable of converting many different kinds of currency to today’s dollars. Here you can convert dollars, cents, pounds, guineas, sovereigns, merk, mark, crowns, florins, shillings, groats, pence, and farthings into today’s money.

    I did a quick search and discovered that a dollar from the year my grandfather was born (1912), had the same buying power as $21.35 today. That same dollar from the year my father was born (1939) has the buying power of $15.34 today. And the dollar from the year I was born (I’m not telling) has the buying power of $6.88.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    FLORENCE, FLORENT, etc., derived from present participle of the Latin florescere ‘to grow, flourish’, the source of English flower.

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    New On NewEnglandAncestors.org

    The American Genealogist, Volumes 14–18
    www.newenglandancestors.org/database_search/tag.asp

    This week, we continue our presentation of The American Genealogist, with the addition of volumes 14–18. Additional volumes will be added every few weeks. The material added this week includes 25,373 name records, 704 title/author records, and 1,481 page images.

    The database may be searched by first and last name. It may also be searched by “article title keyword(s).” This option is an “any match” search that includes article titles and authors. Finally, entering a specific year or volume number, and page number, will provide access to that portion of the journal. When search results are displayed, links to the corresponding TAG pages are provided. Once within a TAG page, additional links allow viewing of the previous or next search result, or the previous or next TAG page.

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    Spotlight: African-American Resources, Virginia
    by Valerie Beaudrault
    www.vcdh.virginia.edu/index.php?page=VCDH

    The following resources for Albemarle and Amherst County, Virginia, can be found on the website of the Virginia Center for Digital History (VCDH) at the University of Virginia, which “promotes the teaching and learning of history using digital technologies.” Click on the Projects link to view a list of current VCDH projects. To go directly to the cemeteries and funeral home projects click on the individual links below.

    African American Cemeteries in Albemarle and Amherst Counties
    www2.vcdh.virginia.edu/cem/index.shtml

    This African-American cemeteries project, which began in 2001, “exists to collect remembrances of historic black funerals, cemetery locations, and biographical information about local families.” Those involved with the project hope that the information gathered from the gravestones will help to “reconstruct the history of over two hundred years of African-American communities in Albemarle and Amherst Counties.” They also note that while today's African-American population for these counties is between 10 and 15 percent, it numbered nearly 50 percent in 1860.

    List of All Cemeteries
    Click on the List of Cemeteries link on the main page to view a list of the 36 cemeteries included in the database. This list includes the cemetery name, county where it is located, type of cemetery, number of individuals whose graves are documented in the database, and the number of markers in the cemetery. Five different types of cemeteries have been identified:

    • Slave Cemeteries—located on ante-bellum plantations
    • Church Cemeteries—founded after emancipation with the creation of formal African-American congregations
    • Community or Neighborhood Cemeteries, associated with ante-bellum Free Black communities and post-1865 African-American communities
    • Public Cemeteries, in the past, often segregated by race
    • Family Cemeteries (usually located adjacent to a homestead that may or may not still be owned by the descendants).

    Click on the cemetery name link in the table to open a new page where you can read a description of the cemetery, including information about its location and a brief history. Click on the Number of Markers and Number of Individuals links to view photographs of the cemetery’s gravestone markers with detailed information about the individuals buried in the cemetery, where known. In cases where a cemetery is located on private property, the location may not be given. Information about the individuals buried in the cemetery has been made available, along with photographs of the gravestones.

    Database Search
    You can search the cemetery database on the website’s main page or you can click on the People Search link to access the database search page. The database can be searched by first or last name. The data fields in the results returned include deceased’s name, cemetery name, and county name, as well as birth and death dates. Click on the name link to view the individual record. The data fields in the individual record include name, year of birth, if known, year of death, age, veteran status, inscription and marker number. Click on the cemetery name link to access the cemetery description page.

    Other Resources

    J.F. Bell Funeral Home Database
    www.virginia.edu/woodson/projects/bell/
    (Please be advised that the link under Other Resources on the African American Cemeteries in Albemarle and Amherst Counties website is not functioning. You should use the URL listed above.)

    The J.F. Bell Funeral Home database project began in 2001 as a cooperative venture between the African American Genealogy Group of Charlottesville and the J.F. Bell Funeral Home in Charlottesville. The records in the database cover the period from the J.F. Bell Funeral Home’s beginnings in 1917 to the 1970s.

    The information in the database was extracted from copies of death certificates and/or transportation of corpse forms that accompanied remains when they were shipped from one location to another. Information on cause of death, the specific address of deceased, occupation, and financial information is not included. Transportation forms often included only the name, and date and place of death for the deceased. Some of them are almost as complete as a death certificate.

    Click on the Go to Database link to access the search page. You can perform a simple search of the database by last name or a more advanced search by last and first name, date of birth, place of birth, family name, date of death, place of death, and place of burial. Click on the Last name link on the left side of the search page to bring up a list of all surnames included in the database. Then click on the surname link to bring up a list of all individuals with that surname in the database. The data fields in the search results include name, birth date, birth place, parents names, mother’s maiden name, date of death, place of death, place of burial, other information, spouse’s name, occupation, age at death and type of record.

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    Stories of Interest

    I-95 Dig Offers a Peek into 18th-Century Life
    Genealogist Rich Remer recently found a new resource for his ancestor Godfrey Remer. State archaelogists have unearthed 25,000 artifacts from Godfrey's property in Fishtown during highway construction.

    Seven Civil War Stories Your Teacher Never Told You
    From Mental Floss via CNN. See how many you recognize.

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    Question of the Day

    Each day (M-F), David Lambert, the NEHGS Online Genealogist, will post an interesting "Question of the Day" on http:///www.NewEnglandAncestors.org to share with you. We hope these questions will be valuable and beneficial in your research. Check back daily for new questions and answers or read through our archives. What follows is a question asked this week. You are invited to submit research questions to David Allen Lambert at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first come, first-served basis. In some cases, he may need to refer individuals to the NEHGS Research Service for more in-depth research services for a fee. You can view more questions of the day at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/7389.asp.

    Question:
    Our ancestor was in the Civil War serving from New Hampshire. I am wondering whether or not a button I found In a box of his personal keepsakes from the war is from the Civil War. Do you know what a button with an eagle and AVO or AVC stands for and how old it might be? On the back I can make out Philadelphia as the maker. This would have been something I assume my ancestors picked up off the battlefield.

    Answer:
    Your ancestor picked up a button belonging to a member of the Confederate Army. The initials AVC stand for the Alabama Volunteer Corps. This button was produced before the Civil War by the Lambert & Mast Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to John F. Graf, Warman’s Civil War Collectibles (Iola, Wisc., Krause Publications, 2003), this button is worth around $400.

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    Free Shipping on Great Migration Titles

    The NEHGS Sales Department is offering FREE book rate shipping on all Great Migration titles. This offer is good on The Great Migration Begins, 1620-1633 (three-volume set); The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-35 (five volumes); The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony, 1620-1633; The Complete Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 1–15; and The Great Migration Newsletter, Volumes 11–15). The free shipping is for economy/book rate shipping only. Economy shipments can take 10-20 business days to arrive, depending on location. Customers must choose economy shipping on all online orders or request it when purchasing by phone.

    Offer good for ONE WEEK ONLY, from June 17, 2009 through June 24, 2009.

    Did you know that the NEHGS Sales Department offers library-quality copies of over 10,000 rare and out-of-print books? Some titles ordered by recent customers include:

    Eckert Record: Story of Georg Bernhardt Eckert & His Descendants, 1793-1957 (Item P4-H09348)
    A Century and a Half of the Isaac Harrison Family, 1744-1899 (Item P4-H13476)
    Memorial of the Descendants of Amos Morris of East Haven, CT (Item P4-H19782)
    Col. William Rose of Tennessee, His Ancestors & Descendants, 1034-1938 (Item P4-H22698)
    John Gibson of Cambridge, MA & His Descendants, 1634-1899 (Item P32180000).

    You can search the entire Classic Reprints catalog online at www.newenglandancestors.org/store.asp. If you would like a list of FAQs and search tips for the Classic Reprints catalog, simply send an email with "Classic Reprints" in the subject line to sales@nehgs.org.

     

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a number of dynamic lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists and the general public. Programs are held at 99 Newbury Street unless otherwise indicated. For more information, please contact Ryan Woods at 617-226-1226 or rwoods@nehgs.org.

    You can view a full listing of upcoming programs: www.newenglandancestors.org/events/6816.asp.

    Seminars and Tours
    Correction: The dates of Come Home to New England are incorrectly stated in the recently mailed Education Programs and Research Tours brochure. The program dates are June 22–27, 2009 and August 10–15, 2009.

    Come Home to New England
    Monday, June 22–Saturday, June 27, 2009
    The staff of the New England Historic Genealogical Society invites you to participate in our classic intensive week-long program, "Come Home to New England." Research your roots with expert assistance at the extensive NEHGS library, one of the premier genealogical facilities in the world. Whether you are a first-time participant or have enjoyed this program in the past, you are sure to benefit from a visit to our library and extended time with our staff of professional genealogists as they welcome you "home" to New England. Throughout the week of guided research, you will have the opportunity for one-on-one consultations, daily lectures and special extended library hours.

    Newfoundland Research Tour
    Sunday, July 12–Sunday, July 19, 2009
    Discover your Newfoundland family history with NEHGS in the provincial capital of St. John's. Join expert genealogists at St. John's premier facilities, including the Provincial Archives — "The Rooms," the Maritime History Archive at Memorial University, the Registry of Deeds, and A.C. Hunter Library. Together these repositories hold vital records; church records; all census records; voter lists; probate; land grants; the Keith Matthews collection (list of all people who worked in fishery from 16th century to 1850); ship lists; crew lists; logbooks; Irish and English parish records; and original Newfoundland newspapers.

    Come Home to New England
    Monday, August 10–Saturday, August 15, 2009
    The staff of the New England Historic Genealogical Society invites you to participate in our classic intensive week-long program, "Come Home to New England." Research your roots with expert assistance at the extensive NEHGS library, one of the premier genealogical facilities in the world. Whether you are a first-time participant or have enjoyed this program in the past, you are sure to benefit from a visit to our library and extended time with our staff of professional genealogists as they welcome you "home" to New England. Throughout the week of guided research, you will have the opportunity for one-on-one consultations, daily lectures and special extended library hours.

    Scottish Family History Research Tour
    Sunday, September 20–Sunday, September 27, 2009
    Discover the origins of your Scottish ancestors with the inaugural NEHGS research tour to Edinburgh. This week-long intensive research program will be based out of Scotland's two premier genealogical repositories, The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) and the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS). Together these neighboring repositories house the major collections of government and vital records for more than 700 years of Scottish history. The main holdings of NAS include records created by the government of Scotland beginning in the twelfth century, including records of the crown and parliament; legal registers; court documents; and records of the Church of Scotland. Vital records, including births, marriages, and deaths from 1855 and parish registers from 1553 to 1854, are maintained by the GROS. Program registration includes lodging at the Sheraton Grand Hotel and opening and closing dinners.

    Salt Lake City Research Tour
    Sunday, October 25–Sunday, November 1, 2009
    Join NEHGS for our thirty-first annual research tour to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. Along with more than 70 other participants, you are invited to take part in an intensive week of research where you will be aided by expert staff. Daily programming also includes computer tutorials for accessing the library card catalog, research tips and techniques lectures, personalized consultations and group dinning events.

    For more information about NEHGS programs, visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/programs_events.asp or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

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    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/publications/eNews.asp.

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    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit www.newenglandancestors.org/support.asp.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/join.asp.

    Copyright 2009, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

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