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  • The Weekly Genealogist

  • Vol. 11, No. 10
    Whole #417
    March 11, 2009
    Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault
    enews@nehgs.org

    Greetings from the New England Historic Genealogical Society! This newsletter has been sent to people who asked to receive it. If you would like to unsubscribe or change your email address, please click on the link at the bottom of the email and follow the instructions provided.

    NEHGS collects, preserves, and interprets materials to document and make accessible the histories of families in America.

    Contents:
    * NEHGS Member Discount
    * Bunker Hill Burials Located
    * Research Recommendations: Congressional Cemetery
    * Name Origins
    * New On NewEnglandAncestors.org
    * Spotlight: Vital Records Databases: Tennessee and Kentucky
    * Stories of Interest
    * Question of the Day
    * 10% of all Mayflower Families Through 5 Generations Titles (Silver Books) Extended
    * Upcoming Education Programs
    * NEHGS Contact Information

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    NEHGS Member Discount

    NEHGS is pleased to bring back the 10% Store Discount for NEHGS members on all regularly priced NEHGS and Newbury Street Press titles. As a way of showing our appreciation for our members, we are offering this discount on all such titles listed in our online store and sales flyers. For more information on the member discount, visit
    www.newenglandancestors.org/store/faqs.asp.

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    Bunker Hill Burials Located

    A curator from Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia has collaborated with a Charlestown historian to determine the site where one or two dozen British soldiers were buried. They wish to use ground-penetrating radar to inspect a number of sites stretching down Concord Street from Monument Square. Families living over the sites, however, are conflicted about the discovery, and the possible problems further research will create for them.

    You can read more details in the Boston Globe at www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/03/08/bunker_hill_dead_may_lie_under_gardens/?s_campaign=8315.

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    Research Recommendations: Congressional Cemetery
    by Michael J. Leclerc

    Situated on the banks of the Anacostia River, Historic Congressional Cemetery was envisioned as a neighborhood burial ground when it was founded in 1807. Until 1835 almost every member of Congress who died at Washington was buried in Congressional Cemetery. Even those whose bodies were interred elsewhere often saw a sandstone cenotaph placed in the cemetery as a memorial, a practice which continued until 1876.

    After years of neglect, the Association for the Preservation of Historic Congressional Cemetery was formed in 1976. The Christ Church Vestry turned over operation of the grounds to the APHCC until July 31, 2019. The group implemented a strategic plan that called for extensive historical research and renovation work to be completed in time for the cemetery’s bicentennial in 2007. The cemetery is now a growing and thriving place for neighborhood residents and visitors.

    The final resting place of 19 senators and 71 representatives, the cemetery is home to many famous individuals, as well as average citizens. More than 80,000 individuals are interred there. Among the famous individuals buried here are Civil War photographer Matthew Brady, signer of the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Vice President Elbridge Gerry, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation J. Edgar Hoover, and composer John Philip Sousa.

    Among the many volunteer projects at the cemetery are a number of genealogically significant ones being made available on their website. More than 15,000 photographs have been made of stones, markers, and vaults in the cemetery, and they are in the process of being uploaded to the site. They are laid out in order by range and section, allowing you to scan through to see individuals buried next to each other.

    Volunteers are currently transcribing log books of burials in the cemetery. These logs date back to 1898. Among the information included is the death certificate number, name of deceased, birthplace and last residence, age, and date and cause of death. Also transcribed are earlier records from Methodist Episcopal books.

    Approximately 60,000 individuals are listed in the Congressional Cemetery Interment Index. The index is completely searchable, and you can also browse by surname. A number of death certificates, dating as early as 1884, have been uploaded and made available as well.

    The Historic Congressional Cemetery website at http://www.congressionalcemetery.org/ is a shining example of cemetery restoration, and providing access to vital information for research.

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    Name Origins
    by Julie Helen Otto

    JEMIMA (f): The first of the three daughters (JEMIMA, KEZIAH, and KERENHAPPUCH) of Job’s second family (Job 42:14). In modern times JEMIMA has been pressed into service as a rough feminine equivalent of JAMES.

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    New On NewEnglandAncestors.org

    The Vital Records of Hampton, New Hampshire to the end of the Year 1900
    www.newenglandancestors.org/database_search/Hampton_nh_vr.asp

    The Vital Records of Hampton, New Hampshire to the end of the Year 1900, are from the two-volume set compiled by George Freeman Sanborn, Jr. and Melinde Lutz Sanborn, published in 1992 by the New England Historic Genealogical Society.

    Hampton, New Hampshire, first called Winnacunnet, was settled in 1638 by the Reverend Stephen Bachiler (ca. 1561–1656) and a small group of followers from Newbury, Massachusetts. While settlement had commenced in the summer of that year, the church was dedicated by Mr. Bachiler on 14 October 1638, the date usually considered as the beginning of the town. But the grant from the government of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay (which exercised control over the area at the time), was given on 6 June 1639, when Hampton was "allowed to be a town and hath power to choose a constable and other officers." Thus the town of Hampton officially dates from 1639.

    The original Hampton grant included the present-day towns of Hampton, Danville, East Kingston, Hampton Falls, Kensington, Kingston, North Hampton, part of Rye, the easternmost part of Sandown, and Seabrook. Records antedating the separation of Hampton's "daughter towns," but recorded in the books of those several towns, are not included here, nor are events which may have occurred in Hampton but were retrospectively recorded in other towns. Those must be sought individually.

    Volume One contains Hampton Town Books 1–4, 6, & 10–13; Record of Marriages 1854–1867, Old Norfolk County records (pertaining to Hampton), Mortality Schedules, and Marriages from Court records.

    Volume Two contains Church Records, Cemetery Records Private Records and Bible Records.

    There are 9,290 names in the entries of Volume One, and Volume Two contains 14,258 entries.

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    Spotlight: Vital Records Databases: Tennessee and Kentucky
    by Valerie Beaudrault

    Williamson County Public Library, Tennessee
    http://lib.williamson-tn.org/Special_Collections/Gen.htm

    The Williamson County Public Library is located in the central Tennessee city of Franklin, which is the county seat. The library’s Special Collections and Genealogy department is home to an online Obituary Database. Click on the Obituary Database link on the homepage to access the database. This will open a page with two links to the database. To gain access to the database from your home computer you should click on the “Access Obituaries OUTSIDE the library” link. This will open a new page with alphabetical surname links to records in the database. The database contains more than 43,000 records of twentieth and twenty-first century deaths.

    The data fields include last name, first name, year, month and date, newspaper title, location, obituary, full name of the deceased, newspaper date, and ID. Information in the location field includes whether or not the newspaper has been microfilmed. The obituary field contains a snippet of obituary text. Click on the last name link to view a detailed record. The full text of the obituary, if available, appears in this view. Obituaries are available generally for more recent deaths.

    Kentucky Vital Records Index
    http://ukcc.uky.edu/vitalrec/

    Selected vital records databases have been made available to researchers by the University of Kentucky. This data was acquired from Kentucky's Office of Vital Statistics in 1994 for a research project.

    Death Index 1911–1986 and 1987–1992
    There are two databases are indexes to deaths registered in Kentucky from January 1911 through December 1992. Information in the files includes the name of the deceased, date of death, and age at death, as well as county of death and of residence.

    For the period from 1911 through 1986 researchers can search by name, place of death or place of residence. If you search the database by name, you can narrow your search by place of death or place of residence. Search results for the 1911 through 1986 period include date, age at death, place of death (county), place of residence, and volume, certificate and death volume number. The place of death field is a link. Click on the link to open a page containing a map of Kentucky from the Kentucky Atlas and Gazetteer with the county highlighted.

    For the later years (1987–1992) the primary search is by name, narrowed by place of death or place of residence. The data fields in the results include a number of fields, many containing code numbers, for date of death, age, place of death, residence, sex, race, and birth date, as well as the volume, certificate, and death volume numbers. Again the place of death field is a link to the Kentucky Atlas and Gazetteer.

    Kentucky Marriage Index for 1973–1993
    This database is an index to marriages registered in Kentucky from January 1973 through December 1993, with the exception of the years 1984 and 1985. The data contained in this index includes name of the bride, name of the groom, their ages and residences, and the place and date of the marriage. The database can be searched by the combined names of the bride and groom, the bride’s name alone and the groom’s name alone. The data fields in the search results include groom’s full name, race and residence; the bride’s full name, race, and residence; the date of the marriage; and the county where the license was taken out and where the marriage was performed.

    Kentucky Divorce Index for 1973–1993
    This database is an index to divorces granted in Kentucky from January 1973 through December 1993. The data contained in this index includes the name of the husband, name of the wife, their ages and residences, and the place and date of the divorce. The database can be searched by the combined names of the bride and groom, the wife’s name alone and the husband’s name alone. The data fields in the search results include husband’s full name, race and residence; the wife’s full name, race, and residence; the date of the divorce; the county where the divorce took place; and the year when the couple married and the county where they married.

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    Stories of Interest

    Québecois: Maligned Accent May Have Its Roots in Royal Courts
    Québec’s francophones, long ridiculed by Parisian French, are now having their day. Scholar Jean-Denis Gendron has traced the accent back to the court of Louis XIV.

    Vermonters Search for Roads of Yore
    The state of Vermont has set a deadline of July 1, 2015, by which time all municipalities must find and document their old roads or lose the public’s right to use them. Some of these roads date back centuries.

    A Mug’s Tale
    This 18th-century silver mug hasn’t travelled far: from the North End where it was crafted by silversmith Andrew Tyler, to the Fens, where it is now housed at the Museum of Fine Arts. But the mug (which once played a small part in the Battle of Bunker Hill) was almost auctioned off on eBay.

    Re-Enactor Turns Back the Hands of Time
    Tyngsboro, Massachusetts, native R.W. Provencher plays the part of town founder Jonathan Tyng for audiences, teaching the history of the town. Audiences are growing as the town prepares to celebrate its bicentennial.

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    Question of the Day

    Each day (M-F), David Lambert, the NEHGS Online Genealogist, will post an interesting "Question of the Day" on NewEnglandAncestors.org to share with you. We hope these questions are valuable and beneficial in your research. Check back daily for new questions and answers or read through our archives. Following is one question asked this week. You are invited to submit research questions to David Allen Lambert at onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org. Please note that he will make every effort to reply to each message, but will respond on a first come, first-served basis. In some cases he may need to refer individuals to the NEHGS Research Service for more in-depth research services for a fee. You can view more questions of the day at www.newenglandancestors.org/research/services/7389.asp.

    Question:
    While examining town records in Grafton County, New Hampshire, I noticed some towns offered “assistance out of doors.” What does this phrase mean?

    Answer:
    Almshouses existed to take care of town residents in need. Sometimes aid was dispensed to people not living at the almshouse. Out-of-towners might have required temporary assistance or local residents might have received aid at home, perhaps in the form of wood or food. In these cases, receiving aid was often referred to as assistance “out of doors” – in this case, outside the doors of the almshouse.

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    10% of all Mayflower Families Through 5 Generations Titles (Silver Books) Extended

    The NEHGS sales department is offering 10% off all Mayflower Families Through 5 Generations books (also known as the Silver Books). For a complete listing of available titles, please send an email with the words “Mayflower Families” in the subject to sales@nehgs.org and a listing will be sent to you, along with ordering information. The discount has been extended through March 16, 2009, while supplies last.

    Did you know that the NEHGS Sales Department offers library-quality copies of over 10,000 rare and out-of-print books? Some titles ordered by recent customers include:

    Descendants of John Wirebaugh (1821-96) (Item P4-H27846)
    Kissam Family in America, from 1644-1825 (Item P4-H16938)
    Alphabetical Index of Revolutionary Pensioners Living in Maine (Item P5-ME0120H)
    Record of Will in Woodford County, Kentucky, fro the Period of Years 1788-1851 (Item P5-KY0040H)
    Records of the Swedish Lutheran Churches at Raccoon and Penns Neck, New Jersey, 1712-1786 (Item P5-NJ0136H)

    You can search the entire Classic Reprints catalog online at www.newenglandancestors.org/store.asp.

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    Upcoming Education Programs

    Each year the Society presents a number of dynamic lectures, seminars, and tours for genealogists and the general public. Programs are held at 99 Newbury Street unless otherwise indicated. For more information, please contact Ryan Woods at 617-226-1226 or rwoods@nehgs.org.

    You can view a full listing of upcoming programs: www.newenglandancestors.org/events/6816.asp.

    Lectures

    NEHGS and The Irish Ancestral Research Association (TIARA) St. Patrick’s Day Seminar
    Saturday, March 14, 2009, 9:30 AM—12:30 PM
    This second annual jointly sponsored half-day seminar will feature two presentations: "Irish Archives, Libraries and Genealogy Centres," by Robert O'Neill, Ph.D., and "The Health of Our Ancestors: Public Health from the 17th through the 20th Centuries," by Marie Daly. Robert K. O'Neill is the Burns Librarian at Boston College. He is the editor of Irish Libraries: Archives, Museums & Genealogical Centres. Marie Daly is Director of Library Services at the New England Historic Genealogical Society. She is a former president and co-founder of TIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association) and has been researching, lecturing, and writing about Irish genealogy since 1976.
    This event is free and open to TIARA and NEHGS members.

    Digging Your Ancestors Out of American State Papers & The U.S. Serial Set
    Saturday, March 21, 2009, 10:00 AM
    You have probably heard of the American State Papers and its private claims, but have you heard of the great treasures you can find in The U.S. Serial Set? What is the Serial Set and what will you find there? Join Connie Reik, M.S.L., M.A., Government Publications Coordinator and Reference Librarian at Tisch Library, Tufts University to learn how to search these resources efficiently for maximum results.

    Seminars and Tours
    For more information or to register for any of these events, please contact Ryan Woods at 617-226-1226 or rwoods@nehgs.org.

    Correction: The dates of Come Home to New England are incorrectly stated in the recently mailed Education Programs and Research Tours brochure. The program dates are June 22–27, 2009 and August 10–15, 2009.

    NEHGS Weekend Seminar—Phoenix, Arizona
    Saturday, March 21, 2009, 9:30 AM–4:00 PM
    Join expert genealogists from the New England Historic Genealogical Society for a one-day seminar devoted to best practices in family history research and presentations to help you find your New England ancestors.

    The conference will be held at The Foothills Golf Club, 2201 East Clubhouse Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85048. Registration includes a continental breakfast and deli lunch buffet. For directions, please visit http://www.thefoothillsgc.com/.

    The featured speakers will be Michael J. Leclerc, NEHGS director of special projects, and Christopher C. Child, genealogist of the Newbury Street Press. Topics will include, Internet research methodology, DNA and its uses in genealogy, migrations from Western Massachusetts in 1790 and local resources for Arizona genealogists. Registration is $55 for members, $65 for non-members. To register, please call 617-226-1226.

    Massachusetts Archives Research Day
    Thursday, March 26, 2009
    Spend a day with NEHGS staff amidst the rich collection of the Massachusetts State Archives at Columbia Point, Boston. Archive resources include Massachusetts vital records, 1841–1915; Alien Port Arrivals, 1848–1891; State censuses, 1855 and 1865; and the Felt Collection containing Colonial-era and Revolutionary War land grant, military, tax, legislative, estate and early divorce records. Registration also includes a one-on-one consultation with an NEHGS genealogist.
    Registration fee: $55. Please call 617-226-1226 or email rwoods@nehgs.org to register.

    Spring Research Getaway
    Thursday, April 16–Saturday, April 18, 2009
    Weekend Research Getaways in Boston are among the most popular NEHGS programs in recent years. Escape to 99 Newbury Street and experience a guided research program with one-on-one consultations and special access to the collections. Whether you are new to genealogy or have participated in an NEHGS research program before, a visit to our Boston library to experience our expert staff and vast collections will surely further your research.
    Since 1845 the NEHGS library has collected a vast number of compiled genealogies, local histories, census records, vital records, deeds, probates, and military records. The library has the latest in print, microtext, CD-ROM, and Internet resources. NEHGS also provides a highly trained research staff of professional genealogists who are eager to help you in your genealogical endeavors. While the strength of our collection is in American, English, Irish, Scottish, and Canadian records, with documents spanning seven centuries and covering more than 110 million names, we are able to provide important and essential information on more than just early American families. In addition to our rich archive, we have more than a dozen full-time professional genealogists who have significant experience and knowledge of German, Italian, African-American, Caribbean, French, Native-American, Jewish and Latin American records.
    Registration fees: $300 per registrant for full three-day program; $110 per registrant for single-day program. Registration includes a continental breakfast daily and two group meals.

    English Family History Tour
    Sunday, May 17–Sunday, May 24, 2009
    The English Family History Tour to London is an essential research trip for genealogists with British ancestry. Based at the Society of Genealogists (SoG), researchers will be offered daily classes providing historical context and research methodology tips for working with the extensive record collection of the SoG. The library's holdings include more than 120,000 books and microforms featuring census indexes; family histories; biographies; service, professional, and trade directories; an apprenticeship index (1710-1774), school and university lists, will and marriage license indexes; runs of Burke's Peerage and Landed Gentry; a large number of manuscripts arranged by surname; and a miscellaneous card index of 3 million references.
    Registration fees: (includes seven nights' lodging at the Holiday Inn Bloomsbury) Single, $4,850; Double, $4,550 per person; Double with non-participant, $5,550; Commuter, $2,300 (no lodging).

    Come Home to New England
    Monday, June 22–Saturday, June 27, 2009
    The staff of the New England Historic Genealogical Society invites you to participate in our classic intensive weeklong program, "Come Home to New England." Research your roots with expert assistance at the extensive NEHGS library, one of the premier facilities for genealogical records in the world. Whether you are a first-time participant or have enjoyed this program in the past, you are sure to benefit from a visit to our library and extended time with our staff of professional genealogists as they welcome you "home" to New England. Throughout the week of guided research, you will have the opportunity for one -on-one consultations, daily lectures and special extended library hours.
    Registration fees: $750 per registrant; $125 per non-researching guest.

    Newfoundland Research Tour
    Sunday, July 12–Sunday, July 19, 2009
    Discover your Atlantic Canada family history with NEHGS in St. John's, Newfoundland. Join expert genealogists at St. John's premier facilities, including the Provincial Archives — "The Rooms," the Maritime History Archive at Memorial University, the Registry of Deeds, and A.C. Hunter Library. Together these repositories hold vital records, church records, all census records, voter lists, probate, and land grants the Keith Matthews collection (list of all people who worked in fishery from 16th century to 1850), ship lists, crew lists, logbooks, Irish and English parish records and original newspapers of Newfoundland.
    Registration fees: (includes seven nights' lodging at the Fairmont Hotel) Single ocean view room, $3,250; Single city view room, $3,100; Double, $2,700 per person; Double with non-participant, $3,550; Commuter, $850 (no lodging).

    Come Home to New England
    Monday, August 10–Saturday, August 15, 2009
    The staff of the New England Historic Genealogical Society invites you to participate in our classic intensive weeklong program, "Come Home to New England." Research your roots with expert assistance at the extensive NEHGS library, one of the premier facilities for genealogical records in the world. Whether you are a first-time participant or have enjoyed this program in the past, you are sure to benefit from a visit to our library and extended time with our staff of professional genealogists as they welcome you "home" to New England. Throughout the week of guided research, you will have the opportunity for one -on-one consultations, daily lectures and special extended library hours.
    Registration fees: $750 per registrant; $125 per non-researching guest.

    Scottish Family History Research Tour
    Sunday, September 20–Sunday, September 27, 2009
    Discover the origins of your Scottish ancestors with the inaugural NEHGS research tour to Edinburgh. This weeklong intensive research program will be based out of Scotland's two premier genealogical repositories, The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) and the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS). Together these neighboring repositories house the major collections of government and vital records for more than 700 years of Scottish ancestry. The main holdings of NAS include records created by the government of Scotland beginning in the twelfth century, including records of the crown, parliament, legal registers, courts documents, and records of the Church of Scotland. Vital records including birth, marriage, and death from 1855 and parish registers from 1553 to 1854 are maintained by the GROS. Program registration includes lodging at the Sheraton Grand Hotel and opening and closing dinners. Registration fees: (includes seven nights' lodging at the Sheraton Grand Hotel) Single, $4,750; Double, $4,450 per person; Double with non-participant, $5,350; Commuter, $2,300 (no lodging).

    For more information about NEHGS programs, visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/programs_events.asp or email mailto:tours@nehgs.org.

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    NEHGS Contact Information

    We encourage you to email this newsletter to others who might be interested. To subscribe or view back issues of eNews, please visit www.newenglandancestors.org/publications/eNews.asp.

    NEHGS eNews, like all of our programs, is made possible through the generous contributions of our members. For more information about giving to NEHGS visit www.newenglandancestors.org/support.asp.

    To view the website of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/.

    To become a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, please visit http://www.newenglandancestors.org/join.asp.

    Copyright 2009, New England Historic Genealogical Society
    101 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116

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