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Quebec to Augusta, Maine
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Created By:Donna Goodwin
Would the mode of travel in 1839 from Quebec to Augusta, Maine have been ship or land? Could a 14 year old have traveled alone.  And, would there be records relating to entry at that time?
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Created By:Alison

Looking at a map, part of the provice of Quebec shares the boundary with Maine.  Not knowing where in Quebec the person(s) you seek were prior to being in Augusta, ME, I would venture to guess the travel was by land.

 

It doesn't seem feasible for a 14 year old traveling alone.  He/she probably traveled with a relative or perhaps neighbors.

 

Alison Franks, Archivist, Rawson Family Association

agfranks@comcast.net


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Created By:Donna Goodwin

I am not sure but believe it was from Quebec, Quebec. In the 1800s could anybody cross borders without a problem?  The reason I asked by which route -- My 3rd Gr. Grandfather - as rumor has it- last name had changed from Kings\Roi\Roy to Kingsbury.  There is a Kingsbury , Maine on the road from Canada to Augusta. 

Thank you for your response.


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Created By:Jim

Looking at The Maine Atlas and Gazeteer,  see that present-day Provincial Route 173 (Kennedy Hiway) connects with US 201/ME 6 at the border and US 201 continues on down to Augusta. The US highways were generally laid down over existing historically traveled routes. plus the border crossing is  open 24/7. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quebec_Route_173 for a description of Route 173. This suggests that your ancestor traveled by coach to Augusta.

I seriously doubt a 14-year-old would have traveled alone, altho it's entirely possible.

There my be records of the border crossing, you'd have to check with the National Archives (NARA) to make sure,


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Created By:Donna Goodwin

 Wow, thank you for the information.  I thought it was more likely land but..... family folklore (quite unbelievable) has Lewis coming by ship, jumping off (something about a killing) and changing his name.  The story I have found is not correct. 

 

I will check out your suggestions. 

 

Donna


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Created By:Suzanne

-By land and water may be the correct answer.  It was possible in the mid 1830s to travel by rail from the St Lawrence River to Lake Champlain.  A boat was then taken into the US usually to the area of St Albans VT.  Once there, routes by road or even railroad may have been taken.

 

Age 14 in the 1830s was considered almost an adult.  By age 16, males were able to claim land for example.  The idea of an extended childhood up through 18 (teenagers) was an unknown concept in that era.  It would not surprise me if a healthy 14 year old boy would travel by himself from Europe to Canada and into the United States. My husband's direct ancestor Thomas Farrand and his brother Andrew Farrand came from Ulster in 1718 to Boston.  Andrew was 16 and Thomas was 8.  My research has not discovered any relative who accompanied them.   



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