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Brick Walls
User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 2


Created By:Constance

When, if ever, is there a point where one can assume a relationship without a paper trail of proof?  I have been trying for some time to connect my ggf to a man I am pretty certain is his father, but there seems to be no definitive record I can locate to prove the relationship.

 


User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/26/2010
Posts: 2


Created By:Lee Bennett
As an experienced amateur, I have had similar situations.  Within my family, I may say, "This relationship is assumed, but not proven.", or something like that.  I would never state as fact, anything that I was unsure of, and I'd certainly not publish conclusions on the internet, without plenty of disclaimers.  The job is never done, so my opinion is that you can set a daunting problem aside, but you can never completely close the book until you have better supporting documentation.
User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 3


Created By:Ronald
Many modern genealogy software programs allow one to assign a level of "surety" to any given piece of information.  If you are not sure of something you can assign a lower level of surety such as "unconfirmed, marginal evidence, have not decided yet".  That way if someone else looks at your research they will see how confident you are as to the accuracy of any piece of information.  You can also add notes explaining why you aren't sure of something.

User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 4


Created By:Alison

You might try checking land records as there might be some clues there if the person whom you think could be the father, may have sold or deeded land to your gggrandfather.

 

Alison Franks

Archivist, Rawson Family Association

agfranks@comcast.net


User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 1/5/2011
Posts: 2


Created By:Laurie Kirby

I have circumvented several brick walls by examining records of collateral relatives.

For example, I found my great great great grandfather's name, putative birthplace and that he'd served in the Revolutionary War by searching for records of my great grandfather's elder half-brother. I found he had been interviewed for a county history in 1880 in Indiana and mentioned his both his father's service in the War of 1812 and his grandfather's Revolutionary War service. These clues were specific enough that I was able then to find and use a deed of 1821 when my great great great grandfather sold some land in eastern Ohio -- the buyer was apparently concerned that his sons (one of whom had the same name -- my great great grandfather) might claim the land and so insisted that all the surviving sons witness the deed. I'm still on the trail of absolute proof, but the DAR is willing to accept what I have. This is not the only example of my finding a putative relative by examining records concerning siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins -- I've managed to knock down at least five brick walls this way.

Laurie Kirby


User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/27/2011
Posts: 4


Created By:Michael Chaplin, M.D.

There is in some cases the possibility of using genetic genealogy to help show a connection even if there is no other documentation. 


User Rank: Online Genealogist
Joined: 5/10/2010
Posts: 10


Created By:David Lambert

I had a similiar problem with my Lambert ancestry in Nova Scotia.  I have now determined that I am descendant from John Lambert from Ireland who came to Cumberland County, N.S. ca. 1794.  His son John had a few sons.  However of those descendants there are only 7 living in Nova Scotia, my line there is just myself and my brother.  For years I studied all the Lambert's in Nova Scotia, and it was via a DNA test that confirmed my conclusion.   A later deed even made the evidence stronger when a deed for "love and affection to my son" turned up.  However the deed was written in Halifax Co., N.S. for land Cumberland Co., and finally registered in Colchester County.  You just have to look outside the box of the county you are working in.  I strongly advise DNA testing to strengthen any hypothesis you have.

 

David Allen Lambert, NEHGS Online Genealogist


User Rank: Contributor
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 24


Created By:Virginia

 Hi,

I have a similar problem with my great-grandfather, Sam Parks of Columbia County, NY.

I believe I have his parents identified, through census records and relationships to a couple of his siblings.  However, I have no birth or baptismal record for him.  He owned no property, and worked as a common laborer all his life, except for his Civil War service. His probate record consisted of one brief page, with no genealogical information.

I have his service and pension record.  Plus other bits of information, so I know a lot about him.  Except proof that the parents I believe to be his, actually are.

So, I'm struggling with this same dilemma, about how much information does one need, to prove this relationship.

Ginny


User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 1


Created By:Lynn

Along the lines of proof, I have an unusual situation.... My great great grandmother was born in Nova Scotia in 1841. I grew up knowing her name but in the course of my research I found another last name written on her sons marriage record. Upon further investigation I found that she was adopted. The name on her sons marriage record was that of her adopted family.  I have her marriage record from the NS archives. It clearly states her mother and fathers name. (including middle initial of her mother) I found one documented couple with the same name in the same community. Now here is the problem - the area has a local genealogist who has studied this surname extensively, I contacted her about my gggrandmother to include her in the genealogy of this family. She does not believe this couple are the parents of my gggrandmother because they were not married when she was born and she thinks the marriage record is wrong. I believe that is a good reason to give a child up for adoption and the marriage record should be sufficient proof. My gggrandmother is excluded from the published genealogy. Both families were members of the Baptist church and I can not find any further proof. Is the MR sufficient proof to claim her as a daughter of this couple? The couple later married and had two children, although her obituary states four, I have tried to trace them but cannot. Does anyone have any suggestions?


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Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 3


Created By:Eileen_3
I'm trying to find out what happened to my 2 times great-grandfather David Wentworth, last place was Fall River Ma. directory 1876, in 1880 his wife lives in Camden Maine. says she is a widow.He was born in 1819 in Milton NH, lived in Lawrence Ma. 1850-60-and 70. Wife is Lydia D Wentworth, has children, one named after him David Wentworth 1849-1931. 1819 David was in the Civil War, the Ma. cavalry 1862-1865. He was a plasterer and then a mason by trade. He is my brick wall, thank you for reading this  aepell@metrocast.net
User Rank: Beginner
Joined: 8/9/2010
Posts: 2


Created By:Stafford-Ames
Best tool out there - get a living male of the branch you seek and have him take the Family Tree Y-37 DNA test. It will tell you what "family road" you should seek out. a male named Freeman came to us and said he was an Ames. Had a family story going back to the 1820s. Took the test and we could id him back to a male in 1820. The was the only lead we had and it matched our Ames Society Records. The 37 Y-DNa proved we had the correct male of that story.                   Stafford-Ames     www.AmesSoceity.org

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