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  • For Teachers and Parents Children’s Books - A Bibliography for Young People and Families

    NEHGS

    My African Roots
    By Jacqueline Galloway-Blake.
    Great for your family reunion - an activity book to keep the children busy exploring their heritage and getting to know the family members. Grab the crayons, scissors and glue, this is an activity book for the child who wants to research his family history and learn more about Africa. There are pages to collect family autographs, paste family photos, create a family tree, draw self-portraits and write reports about famous Africans. This unique book grows with the child. The questions become increasingly more challenging and when completed keep this book as a treasured family memento.  

    Who’s Who In My Family?
    By Loreen Leedy.
    The students in Ms. Fox’s class make family trees as they learn how aunts, uncles, cousins, and their other kinfolk are related to them. Traditional as well as blended and adoptive families are represented.

    My Family Tree Workbook: Genealogy for Beginners
    By Rosemary A. Chorzempa.
    An ideal starter book for young genealogists! Large print forms assist children in learning more about their heritage and ask questions pertaining to their lives. 1982. 57 pp. Softbound. Dover Press. Age Suitability: Grades 4-7
      
    Kids and Kin: The Family History Vacation That Involves Kids
    By Patricia Suter and Corinne Earnest
    Six chapters and 82 activities cover pre-planning, traveling, library research, visiting relatives, and returning home. Idea for games, quizzes, races, contests, riddles, scavenger hunts and more.   

    My Family Tree Workbook: Genealogy for Beginners
    By Rosemary A. Chorzempa. An ideal starter book for young genealogists! Large print forms assist children in learning more about their heritage and ask questions pertaining to their lives.   

    Who’s Who In My Family?
    By Loreen Leedy. The students in Mrs. Fox’s class are a kitten, a rabbit, a skunk, a frog, a squirrel and a raccoon. Mrs. Fox is indeed a fox. They make family trees and learn how their aunts, uncles, grandparents, and cousins are them. They also learn the meaning of stepbrother, stepsister, stepparent, half sister, and half brother. They share their family trees and see how every family is unique and special.   

    The Family Tree Detective Cracking the Case of Your Family’s Story
    By Ann Douglas. Not your ordinary “How to book.” Reveals ways to uncover intriguing pieces of family lore. Includes information about e-mail, audiotapes, videotapes and the Internet plus traditional genealogical tips. The text is “Amazing Family Facts” sidebars, plus lively, colorful illustrations.   

    My Family Tree: A Bird’s Eye View
    By Nina Laden.
    Explains relationships in the family with colorful pictures. There are pages to record family histories and to paste in pictures plus a poster to create your own family tree.
      
    My Backyard History Book
    By David Weitzmen.
    For teachers, parents, and children. Tells where youngster can find historical information about himself in unusual places.
      
    A Gift From Grandma: "Our Family," As Grandma Remembers
    by Allerton, George.
    A workbook to be filled out by grandparents for their children or grandchildren replete with helpful forms for organizing family history information. The forms could easily be adapted for use by teachers and students in the classroom. (Orefield, PA: Associated Specialties, Co., Publishers, 1990)
      
    Roots for Kids: A Genealogy Guide for Young People
    by Beller, Susan Provost.
    (Crozet, VA: Betterway Publications, Inc., 1989)
      
    Genealogy
    by Boy Scouts of America.
    (Irving, TX: Boy Scouts of America, 1995) A handbook for completing a unit on genealogy.
      
    Family Fill in Book: Discovering Your Roots
    by Buchman, Dian Dincin.
    (New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1994)
      
    My Family Tree Book: A Fill In and Keep Activity Book
    by Bruzzone, Catherine.
    (Nashville, TN: Ideals Children's Books, 1991.) A basic fill-in activity book for grades K-2.
      
    Kids' America
    by Caney, Steven.
    (New York: Workman Publishing, 1978)
      
    Growing Up in My Family: A Guide for Recording Information on Family History
    by Carlson, Helen L., Linda LeGarde Grover, Daniel W. Anderson, with assistance from Bonnie A. Cusick.
    A book designed to be filled out by young people (grades 3-6) about their families. Topics include family members, clothing, schooling, shopping, food, celebrating, recreation, toys.
    (Duluth, MN: A.M. Chisholm Museum, 1994).
      
    My Family Tree Workbook: Genealogy for Beginners
    by Chorzempa, Rosemary A.
    (New York: Dover Publications, 1982)
      
    Speaking for Ourselves: African American Life in Farmington, Connecticut
    by Donahue, Barbara, and the Farmington Historical Society Research Team.
    This catalog was prepared to accompany a traveling exhibit presented by the Farmington Historical Society. Full of original photos and documents, it is a creative model for other projects documenting local history.Topics include race and color; names; personal stories; African American slaves and free Blacks in New England in the 18th and 19th centuries; the Amistad revolt; and a useful timeline of New England events from 1635 to the present. Probably appropriate for 5th grade to adult.
    (Farmington, CT: Farmington Historical Society, 1998)
      
    The Families Book: True Stories about Real Kids and the People They Live With and Love
    by Erlbach, Arlene.
    Includes descriptions of different family types, making family trees and keeping traditions; solving problems; and staying close to relatives. Appropriate for elementary, possibly middle school students.
    (Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing, 1996)
      
    My Days...My Writings: A Daily Journal for 6 to 9 Year Olds
    by Farrell, Joanne.
    (Pelican Lake, WI: Shoestrings, 1995)
      
    Immigrant Kids
    by Freedman, Russell.
    (London: Puffin Books, a division of Penguin Books, 1980)
      
    Celebrating Families
    by Hausherr, Rosemarie.
    A beautiful picture book.
    (New York: Scholastic Press, 1997)
      
    The African-American Family Album
    by Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas.
    This book, and those that follow, are lavishly illustrated guides to families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds.
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995)
      
    The Chinese American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994)
      
    The German American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996)
      
    The Irish American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995)
      
    The Italian American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994)
      
    The Jewish American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995)
      
    The Mexican American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1994)
      
    The Scandinavian American Family Album
    (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997)
      
    Grandfather's Gold Watch
    by Hubbard, Louise Garff.
    For younger children (grades K-3), Peter cherishes the watch his grandfather gives him before his family leaves Denmark for America. Even after losing the watch on the journey to Utah, he remembers its message.
    (Salt Lake City, UT: Shadow Mountain Publishers, 1997).
      
    Families: A Celebration of Diversity, Commitment and Love
    by Jenness, Aylette.
    "Seventeen children and their parents openly discuss the challenges and benefits of contemporary family life." Good discussion and lots of photographs.
    (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1990)
      
    The Language of Names: What We Call Ourselves and Why It Matters
    by Kaplan, Justin, and Anne Bernays.
    A book for high school students or adults, with lots of interesting information about the history of names. Topics include maiden names, African American names, the etiquette of names, literary names, and new types of names.
    (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1997)
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