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Ask a Genealogist: Looking for the Lincoln Hospital in D.C.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 

Question:

I am looking for  John Franklin Harvey, born 1842 in Dover, MA and died 1890 in Boston, Mass. He was a Union soldier from February 22, 1864 to July 30, 1865. I've recently received my Civil War relative's complete military history record from NARA. It says he was admitted to the Lincoln Hospital in DC on May 24, 1864 (sick and wounded). At the end of his service, he mustered out at the Delaney House in DC on July 30, 1865. Where can I find information about these two locations and if there are any medical or military records that would specify his sickness and wounds?

Answer:

By Rhonda McClure, NEHGS Genealogist

 Delaney House operated as a mustering out site for a number of regiments at the end of the Civil War. You may find additional information about this house by searching the Washington, D.C. city directories of the time. Be sure to look for people with the surname of Delaney as well as perhaps a hotel or rooming house that carries that name. However, there was an Assistant Surgeon for the Army named Alfred Delaney who resided in Washington, D.C. in 1865. It is possible that this was the house being referenced.

In regard to Lincoln Hospital, this refers to Lincoln General Hospital which operated from 23 Dec 1862 through 30 July 1865. Now a residential area in Washington, D.C., the hospital was located at East Capital and 14th Streets. You can find a picture of the hospital by visiting the Historical Medical Sites in the Washington, D.C. Area <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/medtour/lincoln.html>.

Records for the military hospitals can be found in Record Group 94, Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917, of the National Archives. According to the Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States, compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al, under sub-heading 94.12, Records of the Record of Pension Office (PRO) of the War Department, 1784-1919, in section 94.12.3 “Cards Containing Medical Records and Vital Statistics,” the carded medical records include: name, rank, organization, complaint, name of admitting hospital, date of admittance and perhaps other information. Such cards exist for men in the regular army, 1821-84 as well as volunteer organization in the Mexican and Civil Wars, 1846-65.

In addition to the carded medical records, section 94.12.5 “Other medical records” includes records of field hospitals for the years 1821-1912. While Lincoln Hospital was a large hospital, it was dismantled at the end of the war, and could be included in this collection of medical records.

Please note that at the present time, none of these records is available online.

Ask a Genealogist: Revolutionary War Pension records at NEHGS

(Military Records, NEHGS) Permanent link
 

Question:

When I visit NEHGS this week will I be able to research the pension files of my Revolutionary War soldiers?  Or do I need to order microfilm ahead of time.

Answer:

NEHGS offers many subscription databases for you to utilize during your visit to our research center in Boston.  Any patron computer will have access to FOLD3, and HeritageQuest. Both of these websites have images of the Revolutionary War pensions.  The images offered on FOLD3 are a much sharper resolution, and contain the entire file itself.

Ask a Genealogist: What happened to my Rev. War soldier and his pension?

(Military Records) Permanent link
 

Question:

My ancestor served two years during the Revolutionary War, and took part in many battles.  However he died in 1795 and I can not find a pension or bounty land for him.  I know Congress authorized pensions, is there a reason it is not there?

Answer:

The Pension Act of 1818 provided pensions for soldiers who did not have a disability from the service.  This Act of 1818 saw the largest influx of new applications for pensions.  Before that time it was typically disability or officer status was necessary to qualify for a pension.   You may wish to check for pensions and bounty land awarded by the state your ancestor served from.

Ask a Genealogist: Searching for a doctor in the Revolutionary War.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 




Question:  Can you refer me to a source at NEHGS to determine whether a family legend is true?  My ancestor's brother was a Humphrey Fullerton was a doctor from Viriginia.  It is rumored that served in the Revolutionary War.

Answer:  This is true according to Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army during the War of the Revolution. (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1982).  His listing in Heitman states the following: Humphrey Fullerton (Virginia).  Surgeon of Hospital Department in Virginia, 1776 to 1781.


Ask a Genealogist: Researching Mexican War pensions.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 




 

 

Question: Is there a resource to determine whether ancestor got a pension from the Mexican War?

Answer: The National Archives in Washington,D.C. has the pension files for United Statesveterans of the Mexican War.  The indexfor this series is NARA Microfilm publication T317.  The Family Search website has indexed andplaced this scanned index online: https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/show#uri=http://hr-search-api:8080/searchapi/search/collection/1979390 

 


The Online Genealogist: What was WRC on a death notice?

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I found an obituary clipped from 1917 in my grandmother's bible.  I believe this is  for her aunt by marriage.  However a curious abbreviation is on it.  It states services will be handles by her WRC chapter.  What does this stand for?                                                                                  Answer: The W.R.C. stands for the Woman's Relief Corps, this was the auxiliary to the Union Army's Grand Army of the Republic.  Membership was made up originally of mother's, wives, widows and daughters of Union Civil War veterans.  The organization was founded in 1883 and is still existing.  To learn more about what they do go online to: http://suvcw.org/WRC/whatwedo.htm

The Online Genealogist: What was a G.S.M from an obit?

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I was reading an obituary for my grandmother's aunt who died in 1926.  She was listed in her obituary as a honored member of the G.S.M. after losing her son in the Great War.  What does G.S.M. stand for?                                                                                                                         Answer:  The abbreviation of G.S.M. should mean Gold Star Mother.  This would reflect the reference of her son dying in World War I, also called the Great War.

The Online Genealogist: Vermont in the Civil War

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: At one of your lectures you mentioned a good resource for Vermont in the Civil War.  I lost your handout can you refresh my memory?

 

Answer: The website I believe you are referring to is Vermont in the Civil online at: http://vermontcivilwar.org/index.php  It is a very good site and has many good resources, and images.

 

The Online Genealogist: Military Gravestone Abbreviations

(Cemeteries, Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I saw a military marker at a cemetery with abbreviations I do not recognize.  Can you refer me to a cheat sheet?  For instance what is a "T SGT."

 

Answer:  I would suggest a a list that I found online PDF from the Veterans Administration - http://www.cem.va.gov/CEM/docs/abbreviations/Ranks_Army.pdf     To answer your question regarding "T SGT." that is a Technical Sergeant.


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