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The Daily Genealogist: Ancestral Political Affiliations

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

If someone were to ask me to state the political affiliations of my nineteenth and twentieth-century ancestors, I’d be certain about only a few of them. I do know that my paternal great-grandfather, who spent his working life as a conductor on the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad, was a union member and a staunch Democrat. His son, my grandfather, who seems to have been determined to be his father’s polar opposite, was very much a Republican. I know about several other ancestors’ political preferences from mentions in local newspapers — in small town news items, club columns, and obituaries. Even yearbooks have provided clues about nascent political preferences. I can make educated guesses about other ancestors, based on their ethnicities, professions, and the political leanings of their communities and states. But I think the example of my grandfather and his father is instructive: although it is tempting, I’ve learned not to expect that what was true of one individual was true of an entire family. Figuring out the differences — and the reasons behind them — always provides a richer and more interesting account.

An article by D. Josh Taylor, “How Did Great-Grandfather Vote?: Uncovering Your Ancestors’ Political Affiliations,” from the fall 2008 issue of New England Ancestors, offers ideas about identifying your ancestors’ party preferences.

And, on a related note, we present links to two online exhibits on past Presidential campaigns.

Presidential Campaign Poster Gallery from the Library of Congress:
“The presidential campaign posters in this slide show — taken from Presidential Campaign Posters From the Library of Congress: Two Hundred Years of Election Art — collect the best election images going back to the 1828 race between Democrat Andrew Jackson and incumbent John Quincy Adams of the National Republican party, which many historians consider the beginning of modern American politics, in part for its savagery.”

Presidents and Campaigns from the Maine Memory Network:
This slideshow “capture[s] some of the excitement of past presidential campaigns and presidential visits to the state — enthusiasm that transcends political affiliation and eras.”


The Daily Genealogist: Plymouth Pushing License Plate Commemorating Town’s 400th Anniversary

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The organizers of Plymouth’s 400th-birthday celebration hope to get a special limited edition Massachusetts plate design and the slogan “1620 Plymouth 2020” on 3,000 vehicles over the next two years.

The Daily Genealogist: The Race to Preserve History as It Happens Online

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Researchers at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, “found that archiving is not keeping apace with the web's fast turnover — as time progressed, the webpages linked to became increasingly unavailable.”

The Daily Genealogist: Holding On to Heritage Before It Slips Away

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Author Rachel L. Swarns “consider[s] the kitchen a place where traditions and family connections can be passed from one generation to the next.”

The Daily Genealogist: Lost Trails of Tears Segment Discovered Using Google Earth

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

A portion of the Trail of Tears route used by Cherokees — who were forcefully removed from their homelands in Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee and relocated to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) — was identified when the path was being studied online.

The Daily Genealogist: Ancestors elected to public office

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked how many paid genealogical websites you subscribe to, including websites you receive access to as a benefit of membership in a genealogical organization.

8%, I subscribe to no paid genealogical websites.
45%, I subscribe to 1 to 2 paid genealogical websites.
39%, I subscribe to 3 to 5 paid genealogical websites.
7%, I subscribe to 6 to 9 paid genealogical websites.
<1%, I subscribe to more than 10 paid genealogical websites.

This week's survey asks if any of your ancestors were elected to public office. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Godolphin

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

GODOLPHIN (m): Hero of Emmeline, or The Orphan of the Castle (London, 1788), by Mrs. Charlotte Smith. Despite the machinations of the obsessed Delamere, Godolphin and Emmeline are married in the end. Note the use of an actual aristocratic English family name — that of the Godolphins, originally of Cornwall, prominent in English politics from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. The 1850 U.S. census shows three people with the given name Godolphin: Godolphin Alexander (b. about 1840) of Mercer County, Kentucky; Godolphin Angell (b. about 1825) of Scituate, Rhode Island; and Godolphin Leech (b. about 1842) of Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

The Daily Genealogist: Long Beach Public Library, California

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Long Beach Public Library, California

Long Beach is a city located in Los Angeles County, California. The Long Beach Public Library has made resources available on its website, including the LBPL Digital Archive, which contains Long Beach City directories, high school yearbooks, and photographs from the library’s Long Beach History Collection. Click on the LBPL Digital Archive link to access the resources. Next, choose a collection by clicking on an icon.

Long Beach City Directories

The city directory collection covers the period from 1899 through 1969. Click on the thumbnail of a directory to open a new screen that allows for page by page browsing. You can look through the volume by clicking on the “previous” and “next” page links, which are located on the right side of the page. Click on the thumbnail of the page in the box in the center of the webpage to zoom in. Click on the PDF icon in the box to download the entire directory, which you can then browse at your leisure. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the downloaded file.

Long Beach High School Yearbooks

The yearbook collection ranges from the 1900s through the 1950s. The high schools represented are David Starr Jordan, Polytechnic, and Woodrow Wilson. This collection is fully keyword and name searchable. The search box is in the upper right corner of each page. The browse function operates as described above in the city directories collection.

Long Beach Photos

This collection, containing nearly 5,000 images, covers more than 100 years of the history of Long Beach. The collection can be searched by keywords and names, using the search box in the upper right corner of each page. You can also browse through the collection, which is organized alphabetically. Click on the thumbnail to open a new page with detailed information about the image. Click on the image to enlarge it. You can share, save, and print the images, as long as you credit the Long Beach Public Library. If you would like high resolution copies of images, you may purchase then from the library. Ordering information is available on the website.

Long Beach History Index

This database is an index to citations related to Long Beach history found in local newspapers. The newspapers include the Long Beach Press Telegram, the Press, the Press Telegram, and several weekly newspapers as well as selected magazine articles, pamphlets, and documents. You will find references for obituaries, events, some family histories, and more. You can search the index by keyword.

You can also research an address in the city of Long Beach through the history index database. Click on the Research a Long Beach Address link, and read the instructions on how to conduct a search. You will need to enter keywords in the search box that include the street number and street name. Do not include words such as street, drive, avenue, boulevard, etc.


The Daily Genealogist: Writing in Register Style

 Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Register style, a specific format for organizing genealogical data, was first introduced in the January 1870 Register. Editor Albert Harrison Hoyt explained “for the benefit of future contributors to the Register, and perhaps of those about to publish family-genealogies, we have arranged the Sherman Genealogy, a portion of which appears in this number of the Register, on a plan easily understood, and convenient for reference.” In the July 1883 Register, John Ward Dean reported on the ‘Register plan for genealogical records.’ “It has now been in use thirteen years and has given satisfaction. The Publishing Committee will continue to require genealogies intended for the Register to be arranged on this plan.”

Modifications have been made to this style over the last 140+ years to account for changing tastes and technologies, but the format remains flexible, effective, and popular. In the Publications Department we regularly receive enquiries from people seeking guidelines for writing their genealogical information in Register style. We refer them to “Writing a Family Sketch in Register Style,” by Helen Schatvet Ullmann, CG, FASG, associate editor of the Register, which appeared in the summer 2007 issue of New England Ancestors and is available online. Here is an excerpt:

“Whether you just want to write about your grandparents or compile a whole book, the basic building block is the family sketch, treating a couple and their children in an organized and interesting way.”

“What is a family sketch? It’s just a story with a beginning, middle and end. The beginning is the first paragraph that contains the vital information about the parents — all of it. So, if the reader later wants to check back to see just when your great-grandmother married her second husband, it’s easy to find.

“The middle is whatever you want, usually a biography in chronological order. It could include funny stories or a serious analysis distinguishing between your grandfather and another fellow who bore the same name.

“At the end is a list of children with their vital data. You may have mentioned each child as he or she joined the family, married, or died, in the biography above, but it’s still important to have a straightforward list of children at the end. Children for whom there is a lot of information may be continued in their own sketches.”

AmericanAncestors.org also offers “A Template and Suggestions for Writing in Register Style in Microsoft Word”, also by Helen Ullmann, and “A Guide to Basic Register Citation Formats”. In addition, the NEHGS book Genealogical Writing in the 21st Century: A Guide to Register Style and More, 2nd Editionis a useful resource.


The Daily Genealogist: Lost and Found: Discover a Black-And-White Era in Full Color

 Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

In 1938 amateur photographer Charles Cushman began experimenting with color film, and he continued taking pictures until his death in 1972. Today, his 14,500 color images are housed at the Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection at the Indiana University Archives. An NPR Lost and Found audio and image presentation tells the story.

The Daily Genealogist: Is Georgia Padlocking Its Past by Closing Its Archives?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

An opinion piece by historian James C. Cobb of the University of Georgia discusses the recent decision to close the Georgia State Archives on November 1.

The Daily Genealogist: Richard III Dig: ‘Strong Evidence’ Bones Are Lost King

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

“Archaeologists searching for the grave of Richard III have said ‘strong circumstantial evidence’ points to a skeleton being the lost king.”

The Daily Genealogist: Paid genealogical website subscriptions

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many print genealogical journals and magazines you subscribe to, including periodicals you receive as a benefit of membership in a genealogical organization.

12%, I subscribe to no genealogical journals and magazines.
41%, I subscribe to 1 to 2 genealogical journals and magazines.
35%, I subscribe to 3 to 5 genealogical journals and magazines.
10%, I subscribe to 6 to 9 genealogical journals and magazines.
2%, I subscribe to over 10 genealogical journals and magazines.

This week's survey asks how many paid genealogical websites you subscribe to. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Britomart

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

BRITOMART (f): A virgin heroine of Edmund Spenser’s allegorical epic The Faerie Queene (1590, 1596), modeled on Elizabeth I, Queen of England. Britomart L. Fassett (b. ca. 1866), daughter of Charles and Emma (____) Fassett of Rochester, Vermont, m. there 19 Aug. 1886 Hambie C. Martin [VT VRs]; the 1900 census finds them living at 45 Cross St., Gardner, Mass., with son Claude.

The Daily Genealogist: Dallas Genealogical Society

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Dallas Genealogical Society, Texas

Dallas is a large city in northeastern Texas. The Dallas Genealogical Society has made a number of resources available on its website. Click on the Resources tab in the contents list near the top of the homepage to access them.

Cemeteries

Click on the Cemeteries link in the contents list to open the Cemeteries main page. Nearly thirty cemeteries can be accessed, most through a unified database. Click on the name of one of the cemeteries included in the unified database for the cemetery location and other pertinent information. Click on the Search Database link in the contents list to access the database search page. The database can be searched by name. You can search the entire database or select a particular cemetery from the dropdown list. There is a search box for cemetery section and a dropdown list for military service. The data fields in the search results include cemetery, stone type, last name, first, middle, and maiden names, date born, date died, section, subsection, subsection number, part of lot, grave number, and more info. Click on the More Info button to open a detailed record page containing additional information such as spouse’s name, date buried, lot owner’s name, funeral home, tombstone inscription, notes, and military service. The notes field may include the names of other relatives.

The records of the five cemeteries that have not yet been migrated to the unified database may also be accessed from the cemeteries main page. They are the Farmers Branch (also know as Keenan), Marsh and Webb Chapel Cemeteries, Pioneer Cemetery, and Wood Creek Cemetery. Clicking on these cemetery names in the contents list will allow you to view burial listings.

As noted on the website, the Dallas Genealogical Society does not plan to transcribe the records for some area cemeteries because they are available by contacting the cemetery directly. The cemeteries are Forest Lawn Cemetery, Greenwood Cemetery, Laurel Land Memorial Park, Lincoln Memorial Cemetery, Lincoln Memorial Park, Restland Cemetery, Rose Lawn Cemetery, and Sparkman-Hillcrest Cemetery and Mausoleum.

Local Records Databases

Click on the Local Records link in the contents list to open the local records main page. The resources here include the following databases.

Mortality Schedules: This database contains extracted mortality schedule data for Dallas for 1850, 1860 and 1870. The data fields include some or all of the following: name, age, sex, marital status, place of birth, month died, occupation of the deceased, cause of death, and length of illness.

14th District Court Records: This database comprises abstracts from the 14th District Court Minute Book A, for 1846 through 1855. Page numbers are cited in the transcription.

County Tax Records: The tax records in this database were transcribed from reel 1 of the Dallas County Tax Records, and cover 1846 and 1847. The database is searchable by last name and first name. Searches can be limited by stream (name of a creek, etc.) and year. The data fields include last name, first name, acres, grantee, stream, total value, page, roll, and year.

Marriage Records: The genealogical society has transcribed Dallas County Marriage Books A through W, covering 1846 to 1899. Only Marriage Book O, which covers the period from August 6, 1895 through November 26, 1896, is available online. The database can be searched by groom’s last name, bridge’s last name, and officiate’s last name. You can also select the officiate’s name from a dropdown list. The data fields in the results returned include the groom’s full name, bride’s full name, officiate’s full name, marriage date, book, page, and ID number.


The Daily Genealogist: “My Favorite Ancestor” on the NEHGS Facebook Page

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week NEHGS staff posted a new message on the Society’s Facebook page: “My favorite ancestor is . . . because . . .” Many people found those five words to be quite evocative because they prompted eighty-three comments on the topic as of Wednesday morning.

Here are some of the responses:

Roxanne Richardson: My favorite ancestor is my second great-grandmother Emily (Emma) Forder, b. 1849, in Indiana to her English immigrant parents, William and Maria (Wells) Forder. Emma has given me more genealogical fun for my money than any other ancestor. She lived to be just a few months short of 100 years, had four husbands, migrated a total of 6,000 miles over the course of her lifetime, and had six children, one of whom died and another of whom she gave up for adoption.

Laurie Davis: My great-grandmother, Chessell Abigail Bryant Davis. She raised 16 kids and was named Maine Mother of the Year in 1959.

Becky Mascari: I have way too many to count but here are two: My second great-grandmother, Angelica Fritcher, for running me around in circles for years thinking her maiden name was really Fletcher. Bless her for naming one of her sons John Fritcher Davis. My second one is Encyclopedia Britannica Dewey, because who can't love a name like that?

Debora Norton: My great-grandparents — Dr. John Billings and Jessie Wheldon — she for being strong enough to march in front of a May Day parade wearing men's pants, demanding women be able to vote and he, for loving her and standing by her in an era where men did not allow their women to exhibit such reckless behavior.

Lynda Gutierrez: My great-great-grandmother Rachel Mary (Westcott) Trefry (1833–1920), who accompanied her sea captain husband on tall ships throughout much of the world from their Nova Scotia home. She even gave birth to two children while at sea! Her evident spirit of adventure and joy for life is inspirational.

Joyce Chambers: My favorite is Joanna Williams, born 1838 in Wales and buried in a tiny cemetery in Kansas. After searching for her grave and almost giving up, I felt her spirit standing beside me and telling me to turn around — and there was her headstone.

Darlene Hill Burbine: Henry Bozyol Hill (born Nov. 1823 in Salem, Mass., died 4 Aug. 1913, East Boston, Mass.) was an amazing man who helped his mother support his four younger siblings when he was about thirteen, after his father fell overboard and was killed by a shark ! He was an author, business owner, politician, Vice President of the MSPCA, and helped start a national bank in East Boston. He had setbacks, but never gave up.

Karon Towns: My mom, Donna Lorraine (Bowens) Aldrich. She introduced me to the rest of my ancestors.

If you’d like to read more favorite ancestor stories and share your own, please visit the NEHGS Facebook page.


The Daily Genealogist: Washington’s Annotated Constitution Returns to Mount Vernon

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 




George Washington's annotated copy of the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and first Acts of Congress recently sold for $9,826,500 to the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association. This artifact had been in the Mount Vernon Library until 1876, when it was sold at auction for $13, having been consigned by the president's grandnephew.

The Daily Genealogist: How Could You Go Ahead of Me?

 Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

The “Letters of Note: Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience” blog features a poignant letter written by the widow of a thirty-year old Korean man who died in the 1500s. The letter was found resting on his chest when the tomb was excavated in 1998.

The Daily Genealogist: Does the Internet Bring You Immortality?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

In the wake of his stepmother’s death, Marcelo Gleiser muses on how the Internet “offers a kind of passive immortality, the kind acquired through the accumulated storage of the many interactions an individual has with the World Wide Web.”

The Weekly Genealogist: Genealogical Periodicals

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked what role, if any, your ancestor played in the Salem witchcraft trials. (More than one answer could be selected.)

7%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors was executed as a witch.
20%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors was tried as a witch.
22%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors was accused as a witch.
8%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors served as a judge during the witchcraft trials.
5%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors served as a juror during the witchcraft trials.
16%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors testified in court during the witchcraft trials.
11%, Yes, one (or more) of my ancestors accused someone of witchcraft.
57%, No, as far as I know none of my ancestors were involved in the 1692 Salem witchcraft hysteria.

This week's survey asks about your print genealogical journal and magazine subscriptions. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Salem Witchcraft Trial Resources

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey question on ancestors accused of witchcraft prompted many reader emails on the Salem witchcraft trials and the genealogical connections of those who were affected. Given the interest in the topic, this week we present some resources for further study.

Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive and Transcription Project
A collaborative effort undertaken by the University of Virginia and various partners, this website contains seventeenth-century documents, historical maps, biographical sketches, full-text volumes, and more.

Salem Witchcraft Trials 1692
The Salem witchcraft trials are among those profiled in the Famous Trials series by Douglas O. Linder of the University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Law.

Salem Witchcraft Hysteria
Presented by National Geographic, this interactive site allows users to “experience the trials.”

The Salem Witch Museum’s 1692 Sites Tour
Users can click on a modern map of Essex County to find out more about witchcraft-related sites in Salem and ten other area towns.

The Comprehensive Salem Guide
A guide to today’s Salem.

"A Genealogical Perspective on the Salem Witchcraft Trials" by Marilynne K. Roach
This spring 2008 New England Ancestors cover story “presents four cases that illustrate how genealogical analysis proved useful in adding detail and identifying key people.” The article includes over a page of suggested resources that cites genealogical articles for specific individuals and families, including Bishop, English, Bridges, Burroughs, Corey, How, Jacobs, Martin, Proctor, Putnam, Tyler, and Wilkins.

"Hunting for Salem 'Witches” in Your Family Tree" by Maureen A. Taylor
This article on AmericanAncestors.org describes a number of Salem witchcraft trial resources.

 


The Daily Genealogist: Exhibit Idea Leads Back to Own Back Story

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

An artist looking for background information on a Virginia Civil War soldier who died in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, found the information she was seeking in her own basement.

The Daily Genealogist: How Two Stained-Glass Windows Resurrected a Piece of Los Gatos History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

 A tale of two windows originally installed in the Los Gatos, California, Methodist Church in 1881.


The Daily Genealogist: British Family Digs Out Medieval Well Under Living Room

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A man in Plymouth, in sSouthwest England, set out to find the cause of the dip in his living room floor and made an unexpected discovery.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: More Salem Witchcraft Hysteria

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you have an ancestor who was tried for witchcraft. (More than one answer could be selected.)

25%, I have an ancestor who was tried for witchcraft in Salem.
11%, I have an ancestor who was tried for witchcraft elsewhere.
66%, None of my ancestors were tried for witchcraft.

Due to popular demand, this week's survey asks about a wider range of roles ancestors may have played in the 1692 Salem witchcraft hysteria. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Name Origin of Dolor

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

DOLOR (m): Latin dolor ‘pain’, ‘grief’; pronounced “dollar.” Perhaps Dolor Davis, born in East Farleigh, Kent, by about 1599, had some circumstance surrounding his birth (such as the death of one or both parents or of some other family member) which gave rise to his unusual given name, with its sad meaning. Davis, a house carpenter, married Margery Willard in 1624, and immigrated to New England in 1634, living in Cambridge, Scituate, Barnstable, Concord, and again in Barnstable. Dolor Davis died between 13 September 1672 and 19 June 1673. (He did not name any of his three sons Dolor.) [Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634–35 (Boston: NEHGS, 1999), 292–297.]

The Daily Genealogist: Various Massachusetts Cemeteries

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Cemetery Records, Amherst, Massachusetts

The town of Amherst is located in Hampshire County in western Massachusetts. This database comprises burial records from the North and West Cemeteries. Much of the historical information and the photographs of gravestones were contributed to the project by The Association for Gravestone Studies. To find a burial in the database choose a surname from the dropdown list. This will open a new page with the names of all individuals with that surname buried in the cemeteries. The data fields in the search results are “Map It!,” cemetery name, grave location, full name, lifespan (birth and death years), age, and deed. The deed field contains the name of the lot owner, if known. Click on the “Map It!” link to view the location of the burial plot on a GIS map.

Spring Grove Cemetery, Andover, Massachusetts

Spring Grove Cemetery is located in Andover, a town in Essex County. There is a burial database on the town’s website. Click "Spring Grove Cemetery Lot Search" to launch the surname-searchable database. Data fields in the search results include last name, first name, middle initial, age, sex, interment date, section, lot, and an active link to burial information for all individuals in a particular lot.

St. Patrick Cemetery, Lowell, Massachusetts

St. Patrick’s Cemetery is located in Lowell, a city in Middlesex County. The cemetery, originally known as the Catholic Burial Ground, was established in 1832. Many of the city’s Irish residents were buried there (click the History link to learn more).

Click the Genealogy link to access the burial database, which covers 1895 to 2011. The records from 1832 to 1894 are incomplete and are not online at this time. Click the first letter of a surname to open a PDF of search results. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name, middle initial, age, date interred, century, yard, range, section, lot, grave, and funeral director. The numbers entered in the century field are the first two numbers of the century — 18 indicates the 1800s, not the eighteenth century. The burial listings database is a work in progress and will be updated from time to time.

St. Mary Cemetery, Tewksbury, Massachusetts

Tewksbury is located in Middlesex County. St. Mary’s Cemetery was established in 1961. Click on the Genealogy link to access the burial database, covering 1961 to 2011. Click the page image to open the alphabetical database in PDF format. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name, middle initial, age, date interred, section, lot, grave, and funeral director. The burial listings database is a work in progress, and it will be updated from time to time.


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