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Searching for old passenger ship images online.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I was wondering if you could recommend a good website for searching for ship images.  I have tried Google images, but thought you might use one yourself for the same purpose?

 

Answer: I use a British website called "Old Ship Picture Galleries".  There are many images online for 19th and 20th century vessels for free at: http://www.photoship.co.uk/Browse%20Ship%20Galleries/


Local historian in search of U.S. Patents for local inventors.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: As a local member of the historical society I am searching for our inventors.  Is there an easy way to see who applied for United States Patents by a community?  I am not sure where to write to have a search done.

 

Answer:  These records are actually online from Google.  The text of the U.S. Patents are now every word searchable.  For a place name search  I would suggest for example: Boston, Massachusetts; Boston, Mass. and Boston, Ma.  To search the patents go online to: http://www.google.com/patents?hl=en


Searching for an ancestor in the textile Industry.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: My ancestor is listed as a "Deviler" I am not sure if this is a delivery job mispelled. Any ideas what this may be from the directory of 1871?

 

Answer: The occupation of a "Deviler" was the job of someone who operated a "devil".  This was a machine that tore and split rags in the textile industry in the 19th century.


Postcards home from Camp Vail.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I have a few postcards with a faded postmarks.  From what I can gather it was a summer camp in Vermont in World War I.  Can you help me figure out why my great-uncle was there?

 

Answer:  Camp Vail was located in Lyndon Center, Vermont starting in 1917.  It was established to assist the young men of Vermont in the skills of farm labor.  Many of the young men were going off to war and the concern that no one could help out with the farms. To learn more about this agricultural camp go online to: http://www.vermonthistory.org/index.php/camp-vail.html


The Woman's Relief Corps and a rusted flag marker.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I was wondering what the rusted metal marker I found at a grave recently was.  The marker has the markings WRC.

 

Answer:  The marker you described sounds like a flag holder placed at the grave of a member of the National Woman's Relief Corps.  The WRC was the auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic (Union Civil War veterans).  To learn more about this organization started in 1883 go online to: http://www.suvcw.org/WRC/index.htm


Understanding military slang terms when transcribing letters.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Can you suggest some place I can determine slang terms from 1950's Korean War letters I am transcribing.  My late uncle makes references I am having trouble understanding.

 

Answer:  I used the following site when I was transcribing some sailor letters from World War II.  I hope this may help you out: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Glossary_of_military_slang


Searching for records in a town now underwater in the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts.

(Vital Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I am looking to search vital records when I visit NEHGS next week on Enfield, Massachusetts.  I know this town is now underwater due to the Quabbin Reservoir, I hope the vital records were preserved from the 1700s and early 1800s.

 

Answer:  The records were preserved and you can search them at NEHGS. I would suggest you look at the eighty-four microfiche at the Microtext Library at NEHGS using call number F74.E5/M37/1984 for Enfield, Massachusetts Vital Records.  This collection consists of microfiche # 1-3: Births, Marriages, Intentions, Deaths 1783-1849; microfiches # 4-6: Births, Marriages, Deaths 1844-1854; microfiches # 7-9: Births, Marriages, Deaths 1859-1890; microfiches # 10-11: Marriage Intentions 1849-1890; microfiches # 12-28: Birth Index 1770-1938; microfiches # 29-45: Marriage Intentions 1816-1905; microfiches # 46-62: Marriage Index 1816-1937; microfiches # 63-79: Death Index 1802-1938; microfiche # 80: Index to Burials 1921-1930; microfiche #  81 Births, Marriage, Deaths 1891-1892; microfiches # 82-84: Births 1829-1938.


Wondering what a Nob Maker did for work in 1746.

(Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  In a probate file from 1746 in Cheshire, England I find my ancestor's brother was a "nob maker". What did this occupation do for work?  Is this a form of wood working? 

 

Answer:  This occupation actually was another name for a Colonial Wig maker according to my colleague at Colonial Williamsburg.


In search of a 1894 Police Court Naturalization.

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: Where should I begin looking to find a 1894 naturalization record.  The the court of record is the Haverhill, Massachusetts Police Court?

     

Answer: Those records of naturalization for Massachusetts prior to 1906 will be located at the New England Regional Branch of the National Archives in Waltham, Mass.

http://www.archives.gov/northeast/boston/  


Baptism in 1824 on the deathbed of a Vermont resident.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I was reviewing a Vermont diary from 1824 that states my ancestor's neighbor was "baptized in half".  I am puzzled as to what they are referring to?

 

Answer: According to an Anglican Priest the term is most likely "half-baptism".  This was the term for baptism given to someone on their deathbed.


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