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This week's survey: DNA testing for genealogy

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked what genealogy television series you’ve watched. 89% of respondents have watched Who Do You Think You Are? 7% watched The Generations Project. Complete results are:

 

89%, Who Do You Think You Are? on NBC (2010-)

75%, Roots (1977)

40%, Faces of America with Henry Louis Gates Jr. on PBS (2010-)

19%, Ancestors, produced by KBYU for PBS (1997 and 2000)

10%, African American Lives and African American Lives 2 on PBS (2006 and 2008)

7%, The Generations Project on BYU Television (2010-)

 

This week's survey asks if you’ve participated in DNA testing for genealogy. Take the survey now!


Spotlight: More Missouri Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Obituary Index, St. Louis Public Library, Missouri

 

The independent city of St. Louis is located at the middle of Missouri’s eastern border. The St. Louis Public Library offers an obituary database and other resources on its website. First click on the Reference & Research link and then on the Genealogy link to open a new page with the obituary database links.

 

The St. Louis Obituary index was compiled from the death notices, burial permit listings, and obituary articles found in the St. Louis Post Dispatch newspaper. The obituary index currently contains names from the St. Louis Post Dispatch for the years 1880–1930, 1942–1945, 1960–1969, and 1992–2009. There are more than 750,000 records in the database.

 

Click on the ‘Obituary search’ link to access the search page. You can search the database by last name and/or first name. If you know the deceased’s birth and/or death date you can enter the information into the ‘b’ and ‘d’ search fields. The data fields in the search results include full name, newspaper title, the first date of publication on which the death notice or obituary (year/month/day) was published, and page number. If there is a burial permit, that data follows the newspaper information. You can also browse through the obituaries year by year. Click on the ‘Obituaries by year’ link to open a page with links to the records by year. Click on the year link to open a new page. Then click on the first letter of a surname to view a list of all individuals whose names begin with that letter.

Click on the Gateway Family Historian link to view and read issues of the Gateway Family Historian newsletter, a publication of the St. Louis Public Library.

 

Index for the Obituary and Death Notice Collection at the Adair County Historical Society, Missouri

 

Adair County is located in northeast Missouri. Kirksville is its county seat. The Adair County Historical Society has made an obituary and death notice collection available on its website. The index comprises more than 35,000 names. The obituaries and death notices have been extracted from the Kirksville Daily Express, Kirksville, Missouri, and cover the period from March 1979 through December 31, 2010. Some records fall outside that date range, particularly some older ones published in the Unionville Republican. A detailed description of the index’s contents can be found on the database search page. The alphabetical by surname index includes the surname and given name for deceased individuals, plus the volume and page number of the death record. Copies of obituaries and death notices can be ordered from the Adair County Historical Society for a fee.


A Note from the Editor: Writing Articles for American Ancestors magazine

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week I wrote about value of genealogical article writing and offered some opinions on approaches and topics. This week I describe the article process at American Ancestors and provide some suggestions of what to do and what not to do.

Many people submit articles and article proposals to American Ancestors, generally via email at magazine@nehgs.org. We review the submissions, sometimes ask for more information, and select a few for publication. Once an article is selected, we agree on a deadline with the author, schedule the piece for a particular issue, and assign a word count. The author signs a letter of agreement.

 

Next, the article goes through an initial edit, which can be quite substantial. The author might be asked to supply additional information, clarify material presented, or delete sections. Two more editors review the article, which is then formatted in the publishing software we use for the magazine. The author is asked to supply relevant images and if additional images are needed, staff members find them. A number of proofreaders (usually three or four) review the article toward the end of the process, and the author receives a PDF of the completed article to review a few days before press time.

 

View the writer’s guidelines for American Ancestors magazine.

 

Pitfalls to avoid:

 

  • Don’t submit an article tailored for family members without some rewriting.
  • Don’t use pet names (i.e. “Nana” or “Grandpa”).
  • Don’t use placeholders (brackets or an xx) to signify that information is missing and will be filled in later.
  • Don’t send a word processing file that presents challenges. Microsoft Word is best.

 

Practices to follow:

 

  • Familiarize yourself with a magazine’s articles before you submit to the publication.
  • Space is at a premium in a print publication; think carefully about what to include.
  • Ask yourself, “Would readers enjoy this article if they were not related to the subjects?”
  • Ask someone not familiar with the story’s cast of characters to read the article. If your reader has a hard time following the story and keeping track of who is who, reevaluate how you’ve presented the material. 
  • When you cite sources, use a standard modern style and be consistent. We use the Chicago Manual of Style or the online Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide.
  • Don’t embed images in the text. Generally embedded images aren’t usable; images should be emailed separately.

 


After you finish your article, set it aside for a few days and read it once more before you submit it.


Finding Friends & Family in the Commons

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

A section of Flickr Commons allows users to note family connections they’ve spotted within the collections of the massive photo-sharing site. A related article on Slate.com, “What’s Grandpa Doing on Flickr?,” highlights some of these finds.

Climbing on the Family Tree: the Joys of Searching for your Roots

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

“Tom McMillan vaguely wanted to know 'where I came from.' Then he began to dig around. What he found was 'riveting, fascinating, head-slapping and jaw-dropping.'” From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

This Week's Survey: Genealogy Television Series

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked who, if anyone, introduced you to genealogy. 42% of respondents became interested in genealogy on their own, and 18% were introduced to family history by a parent. Less than 1% was introduced by a grandchild. Complete results are:

 

42%, No one introduced me; I became interested in genealogy on my own

18%, My parent(s)

17%, Another relative

13%, My grandparent(s)

6%, A friend

2%, Someone at a local genealogical or historical society

2%, My son or daughter

Less than 1%, A librarian

Less than 1%, My grandchild

 

This week's survey asks what genealogy television series you’ve watched. Take the survey now!


Name Origins: Zeitlose

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ZEITLOSE (f): German zeit ‘time’ + -los(e) ‘–less’, ‘timeless’, ‘eternal’. Zeitlose (von Eschwege) von Scholley (m. 1569, d. 1572), “daughter of Herting von Eschwege of Reichensachsen [Hessen-Kassel] and his wife Anna von Brenken,” was the first wife of [Col.] Georg von Scholley (d. 1583). The couple was ancestral to the distinguished genealogist Milton Rubincam (TAG 46 [1970]: 4), as I found while indexing TAG.

Spotlight: Cemetery and Obituary Databases for Georgia and South Dakota

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Rome, Georgia, Cemetery Databases

 

Rome is a city in Floyd County, Georgia, which is located in the northwestern part of the state. The city of Rome has made two burial databases available on its website. The first database is an index to burials in Eastview and Oakland cemeteries. The second indexes burials in Myrtle Hill Cemetery, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Click on the cemetery link to open the search page. The indexes can be searched by last name, first name, date interred, section and lot. There is also an “AKA search”, which focuses on the name and AKA fields only. The data fields in the search results include title, first name, middle, last name, AKA (also known as), Jr/Sr, date of birth, date of death, date interred, grave location (section, block, lot, grave), funeral home and place of death. In addition to the burial listings you will find the Myrtle Hill Education Handbook, which I found to be quite interesting. The handbook was developed as part of a grant-funded project aimed at 2nd through 5th graders to, in part, help them “gain an understanding of their community’s history through the study of the cemetery.”

 

Sioux Valley Genealogical Society Databases

 

Sioux Falls is the largest city in South Dakota. It is located in the southeastern corner of the state and is the county seat of Minnehaha County. The Sioux Valley Genealogical Society has made obituary and cemetery databases available on its website.

 

Click on the Obituaries link to open a new page. This alphabetical database contains more than 100,000 records for individuals whose obituaries or death notices are in the collections of the Sioux Valley Genealogical Society Library. These obituaries have been collected from a variety of sources, which include the Hills of Rest Cemetery and other cemetery records, funeral home records, pioneer certificate application files, correspondence files and other miscellaneous files found in the Society’s library. The index also includes information from obituaries extracted from the Sioux Falls Argus Leader and those sent to the society to be included in its files. Because the Sioux Falls Argus Leader is a regional newspaper, obituaries of individuals in southwest Minnesota, northwest Iowa and a large region of South Dakota may be found in the database. Click on the first letter of the surname in the index. The data fields in the index include surname, first name, middle name, maiden name, date of birth, and date of death. This is a work in progress with names being added as they are indexed. Copies of obituaries can be obtained from the library for a fee.

 

Click on the Cemeteries link to open a page with links to three databases. One database contains a list of Minnehaha County cemeteries. A second contains a list of Lincoln County cemeteries. The third link is to the South Dakota Gravestones website with a database that comprises more than 124,000 gravestone photographs from across the state. You can search the database by last name and first name and you can limit your searches by county or search all counties at one time. Click on the Surnames link to browse lists of surnames by county. Click on the Cemeteries link to access links to the cemeteries in each county. Click on the cemetery name to view a list of the people buried there whose photographs are in the database.


A Note from the Editor: Writing Articles

 Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Since becoming the editor of New England Ancestors (now American Ancestors) magazine in 2003, I’ve read many article submissions and thought a great deal about what makes a good story. In this column, I want to encourage you to write down some of your family history in article form, whether or not you are interested in publication. 

 

Genealogical research is fun. Genealogical writing can seem like more of a chore, but I urge you to capture some of the stories you’ve uncovered for yourself, your family, and perhaps for a wider audience. Contemplating a publication that would cover all your ancestors can seem overwhelming and intimidating, but I think that writing up article-length summaries and case studies is more manageable — and it can be beneficial. 

 

Some of the rewards of writing down the results of your research are obvious — having a clear summary that can be consulted and shared. But there can be some additional benefits. Assigning yourself a fairly limited topic motivates you to make sure you’ve done all the research you can do. Writing an article almost always increases your knowledge of the family in question. When writing, you are forced to be rigorous, to recheck sources, and make sure your claims can be verified. If your article is selected for publication, you also get input from editors and proofreaders who may question your assumptions or ask questions and draw conclusions that hadn’t occurred to you. 

 

For American Ancestors, a successful article:

  • Tells a good story that engages readers
  • Is focused on a particular topic — and doesn’t attempt to include all known information on an individual or family
  • Often includes an unexpected twist, the solution to a mystery, or some sort of “eureka moment”
  • Provides reliable documentation.

If you are writing only for yourself or family members, you may be producing summaries of ancestral lives — useful and necessary material that would not be of sufficient interest for a genealogical publication. But that doesn’t mean you can’t write up particular ancestors or episodes as if you were writing for a broader audience — family members may well be receptive to a more lively presentation and you can practice a wider range of writing styles. 

 

Sometimes I receive article submissions that simply provide a biographical sketch of an ancestor. The documentation may be exemplary but the story isn’t likely to catch the interest of a general audience. I often suggest that these writers go through their family lines and select a few people and incidents that have captured their imaginations. When the story is exciting to you, you can make the story exciting for others. 

 

Here are some examples of article themes featured in American Ancestors:

 

  • Discovering the truth behind a long-standing family tradition
  • Solving a brick wall, especially by using an interesting method or source.
  • Using DNA to prove (or disprove) family stories
  • Examining the life of an ancestor through a diary or letters
  • Documenting a family migration
  • Sharing information about an unusual record or set of records
  • Relating unusual or unexpected information about ancestors; for instance, a previously unknown criminal background or a hidden marriage
  • Telling the story of an ancestor who participated in a significant historical event, like the California gold rush or the Civil War. 

 

Next week I will discuss the specifics of writing for American Ancestors with some tips for would-be article writers.


New York Woman Buys Fallen WWII Soldier's Medal at Antique Shop, Returns It to Family

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

The Huffington Postreports: A Vermont Army National Guard officer returned a Purple Heart to the family of the recipient, who had been killed in France during World War II.

Montiel Roode McAuley recalls her father Stephen Roode, a Civil War veteran

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

Masslife reports: Ninety-five-year-old Montiel Roode McAuley recalls memories of her father, who served in the 9th Vermont Infantry. McCauley and her older brother number among the two dozen or less living “Real Sons and Daughters” of Civil War Union soldiers.

US in Living Color: Rare Look Into Great Depression

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

The Boston Channel reports: A slideshow of eighty-four rare color images from the Library of Congress offers a unique view of life in the United States in the 1930s.

This Week's Survey: Who introduced you to genealogy?

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Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many genealogy and family history books you purchased in the last year. 57% of respondents purchased between one and five books in the last year and 3% purchased more than twenty books. Complete results are:

57%, 1 to 5 books

23%, none

13%, 6 to 10 books

4%, 11 to 20 books

3%, more than 20 books

 

This week's survey asks who, if anyone, introduced you to genealogy. Take the survey now!


Name Origins: Sobriety

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

SOBRIETY (usually f): Widow Sobriete (Hilton) Moulton d. Hampton, N.H. 31 Jan. 1717/18 ae. 85 (Hampton VRs 1:125); Henry Moulton “and Sobrietie his wife” [no maiden name recorded], who were married at Hampton 20 9th mo. 1651 (VRs 1:555), had children rec. Hampton 1655-1666; a granddaughter was Sobriety Moulton, b. Hampton 13 Aug. 1694 (Hampton VRs 1:71), daughter of their son Josiah Moulton (b. 26 2nd mo. 1662) and wife Elizabeth (Worthington) (Hampton VRs 1:78).

This is one of the less common “virtue names” dear to Puritan parents. Sobriety — defined as a state of sedate or gravely or earnestly thoughtful character or demeanor — was no doubt especially valued when exercised in calm consideration of virtue and Biblical wisdom. Probably this meaning was first in Sobriety’s parents’ minds, rather than the simple avoidance of drunkenness.


Spotlight: Lincoln County, Wyoming

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Lincoln County, Wyoming

 

Lincoln County is located in the southwestern part of the state. According to the website, Lincoln County is comprised of two sections, Upper Lincoln County or Star Valley, and Lower Lincoln County, which includes Kemmerer and Cokeville. To access the resources available through the Lincoln County website, click on a location button to open a new page.

 

Cokeville Headstones


This online database contains a collection of digital images of more than 913 headstones from cemeteries located in Cokeville. The cemetery names are Border, Cokeville, Geneva, Raymond, Sage, and Smith Fork. The images may be downloaded to your computer and printed free of charge. Instructions for navigating the database have been provided. The images are in jpeg file format and have been organized alphabetically.

 

Cokeville Obituaries


This database contains images of obituaries and funeral notices from the local newspaper. Images are being added to the database as they are received. Currently there are fifty-one obituaries in the Cokeville database. They have been organized alphabetically. Each obituary may be downloaded free of charge.

 

Kemmerer Headstones


This online database, sponsored by the Lincoln County (Kemmerer) Historical Society, is a collection of digital images of more than 2,700 headstones from cemeteries located in Kemmerer. The headstones are located in the Beaver, Diamondville, Ham's Fork, Holden, Kemmerer, Twin Creeks, and Viola–LaBarge cemeteries. The images may be downloaded to your computer and printed free of charge. Instructions for navigating the database have been provided. The images are in jpeg file format and have been organized alphabetically. There is also a link to other Kemmerer burial sites at the end of the Kemmerer headstones main page.

 

Star Valley Headstones


This online database, sponsored by the Star Valley Historical Society, contains a collection of digital images of more than 4,700 headstones from cemeteries located in the Star Valley area. The twelve Star Valley cemeteries are represented in the database: Afton, Alpine, Amesville, Auburn, Bedford, Etna, Fairview, Freedom, Grover, Smoot, Thayne, and Turnerville. The images may be downloaded to your computer and printed free of charge. Instructions for navigating the database have been provided. The images are in jpeg file format and have been organized alphabetically. There is also a link to a few other burial sites in Star Valley, located at the end of the Star Valley headstones main page.

 

Star Valley Obituaries


The obituaries found in this database have been scanned from the Star Valley Independent newspaper, which was first published in 1901. More than 6,800 obituary images have been uploaded to the website. The images may be downloaded to your computer and printed free of charge. Instructions for navigating the database have been provided. The images are in jpeg file format and have been organized alphabetically.


Local Context for National Stories

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Two weeks ago, I visited the Charles A. Lindbergh Historic Site in Little Falls, Minnesota. My parents both grew up in Little Falls, and I’d visited the Lindbergh site, which is operated by the Minnesota Historical Society, since I was a child. This time, I brought my own kids. In the visitors’ center we watched the introductory movie, with original footage from Lindbergh’s historic 1927 flight across the Atlantic, and my kids enjoyed playing in the Spirit of St. Louis replica cockpit.

 

What made the biggest impression on me, though, were the laminated reproductions of newspaper front pages reporting Lindbergh’s accomplishment. Newspapers from New York, Paris, and other major metropolitan areas were represented, and their stories were compelling. But most interesting to me was the front page from the Little Falls newspaper. I picked that one up, sat down, and read every word.

 

While I had many relatives living in Little Falls in 1927, I didn’t expect to find any of their names in the story — and I didn’t. What came through loud and clear, though, was the excitement of a community responding to one of their own — someone who had played there on the banks of the Mississippi and attended Little Falls High School — making good in the most spectacular way imaginable. The articles allowed me to get a sense of what this exciting event would have been like for my two grandmothers, Erna Smith, age seven, and Bobbie Flack, age nine, as well as their parents and even grandparents. (One grandmother always said two of her older sisters flew with Charles Lindbergh in Little Falls, presumably before his transatlantic flight. I wish I could find documentation of that!)

 

What I took away from this experience was the unique perspective a local newspaper could provide on events of national importance. While genealogists generally recognize that historic newspapers are an invaluable resource for finding specific information about ancestors, I hadn’t fully considered how much local color and context a hometown newspaper could provide about a major news event. These accounts convey the impact of national news on an ancestor’s community and provide an additional layer of information about the lives our ancestors led. In the future, I know I’ll be using newspapers of the past in an entirely new way.


Today's Polar Bears Trace Ancestry To . . . Ireland?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

According to a study in the journal Current Biology, every polar bear alive today can trace its ancestry to one mama bear that lived in Ireland during the last Ice Age.

A Journey that Leads to Long-lost Relatives

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Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

The Poughkeepsie Journal reports: A New York woman succeeded in tracing lost branches of her grandmother’s family in California and County Cavan, Ireland.

‘All Jews Are One Big Extended Family’: Tel Aviv U. Professor Spearheads Global Jewish Genealogy Project

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

The Jewish Press reports that the Am HaZikaron Institute of Science and Heritage of the Jewish People in Israel has developed a number of genealogical initiatives, including a website which allows Jews to build family trees and collect family history artifacts with relatives from all over the world.

This Week's Survey: Genealogical Book Buying

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked how old you were when you first began to do genealogy. Interestingly, the responses were spread rather evenly across the decades. Twenty-two percent began their genealogy research when they were between the ages of 16 and 30. No respondents began their genealogy over the age of 80. Complete results are:

12%, under 15

22%, 16-30

17%, 31-40

21%, 41-50

19%, 51-60

8%, 61-70

1%, 71-80

0%, over 80

 

This week's survey asks about your genealogical book buying. Take the survey now!


Spotlight: Maine and Georgia Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Walsh History Center, Camden Public Library, Maine

The town of Camden is located in Knox County, on the Maine coast. Through its Walsh History Center, the Camden Public Library has made local history and genealogy resources available on its website. There are links to these resources on the homepage.

 

Local Histories and Photo Galleries
Researchers will find brief local histories for the towns of Camden, Rockport, and Lincolnville on the site. You will also find a collection of photographs containing images of scenes in these towns under the Photo Galleries link.

 

Oral Histories
The Walsh History Center has collected the oral histories of several long-time residents of the Camden, Rockport, and Lincolnville areas and made them available through the library’s Oral History Program. At present one of these “living histories” has been made available on the library’s website.

 

Cemetery Database
Click on the Cemetery Database link to open the search page. Click on Find in the blue banner to begin your search. Enter the information about the individual for whom you are looking in the boxes in the first row of the table. The data fields are the same as the search fields, which include first name, last name, date of birth, date of death, cemetery name, and notes. The notes field includes information such as parents’ names and spouse’s name. There is also an advanced search option with additional search fields, such as birthplace, occupation, and affiliation (fireman, Mason, veteran). Click on the magnifying glass at the end of the row to view a detailed record.

 

Vital Records Database, Augusta-Richmond County Public Library, Georgia

Augusta, also known as Augusta–Richmond County, is a consolidated city located along the Savannah River. The vital records database is an index to births, marriages, deaths and other announcements published in the Augusta area newspapers, including the Augusta Chronicle and Augusta Herald. The index covers the period from 1982 through the present. Some records from 1981 have also been included. According to the website, the database is updated weekly. The database can be searched by name, spouse’s name, event type, event date, source, and source date. The data fields in the index include name, spouse’s name, event abbreviation, event date, newspaper date, newspaper page and column information, and newspaper name. Click on the print link to print a specific record.


A New Beginning

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

This issue of The Weekly Genealogist marks a new beginning. With Michael Leclerc’s departure from NEHGS, I have become the new editor. I will be assisted by Valerie Beaudrault, who has proofed the enewsletter and contributed the Spotlight column since 2004, and Jean Powers, my colleague in the Publications Department. Over the years Michael did a superb job of developing a clear format and engaging content for The Weekly Genealogist. As the new editor, I’m looking forward to building on the foundation he established as well as introducing some new elements.

 

I first joined the NEHGS staff in 1995 as sales manager. My position changed in 2001 when I assumed a marketing role. In 2003, I became the managing editor of New England Ancestors, now American Ancestors. I also work on the Great Migration Study Project and other NEHGS publications.

 

Some of you who are long-term subscribers may remember that I was the enewsletter editor from 2001 until 2004. In fact, when I became the editor of HisGen Highlights (as it was called) in 2001, I was taking over from Michael then, too. As I was writing this announcement, I checked the enewsletter archive for the exact date and found that I’d written the following on September 7, 2001:

 

“I am pleased to announce that with this issue of HisGen Highlights I am assuming the role of enewsletter editor. I'd like to thank Michael Leclerc, the previous editor, for all the improvements he made to the enewsletter and for the help he has given me during this transition. My work on the enewsletter will be part of my new position as the NEHGS marketing director. Although I have just started this position, I have been with NEHGS since 1995 as sales manager. You may remember me standing behind the table selling books at various conferences or taking your sales order over the telephone. In my new role I am pleased to have the opportunity to spread the word, not only about what we offer for sale, but about our great education programs, magazine and journal, and library and research resources. I am excited about using this enewsletter as a means to keep you informed about NEHGS and its activities as well as news from the larger genealogical community. As time goes on, I would like to solicit your input and content to make this enewsletter into more of a forum for us to educate one another.”

 

Nearly ten years later, as I reassume the enewsletter editorship, I find my words still hold true. I continue to be excited at the prospect of choosing and shaping interesting stories about NEHGS and the genealogical world. I’m looking forward to where The Weekly Genealogist goes from here.


Woman, 94, Reunited with Long-Lost Family

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

WCVB reports that Maine native Helen Curran Giberson met her father’s “second family” for the first time last weekend in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Hidden Village Excavated in Central Park

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

CNN reports that archeologists have found remnants of a nineteenth-century African-American village located in today's Central Park.

Half of European Men Share King Tut's DNA

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Jean Powers

Jean Powers
Production Editor

Reuters reports that Swiss scientists have reconstructed the DNA profile of King Tut and discovered he shares a haplogroup with more than fifty percent of men in Western Europe — a haplogroup found in less than one percent of modern Egyptians.

This Week's Survey: At what age did you begin genealogy?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked about missionary ancestors. 81% of respondents did not know of any ancestors who were missionaries. 6% reported missionary ancestors in the Western United States, and 5% percent reported “missionary service elsewhere in the world.” Only 1% had missionary ancestors in the Middle East. Complete results are:

 

81%, I do not know of any ancestors who were missionaries

6%, Western United States

5%, Missionary service elsewhere in the world

4%, Eastern Asia

2%, Pacific Islands

1%, Middle East

1%, South America

 

Readers who wish to learn more about missionary ancestors may enjoy Rhonda R. McClure's "Onward Christian Soldiers: Researching New England Missionary Ancestors," New England Ancestors 9 (2008) 1:29-31. This issue also features Jonathan Conant Page's "New England Missionaries Abroad: The Allen and Wheeler Families in the Ottoman Empire," and Betty Fullard-Leo's "Lucy Thurston, Missionary Wife." These articles are available to NEHGS members through AmericanAncestors.org.

 

This week's survey asks how old you were when you first began your genealogy. Take the survey now!


Name Origins: Michael

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

MICHAEL (m): Hebrew, "who is like God" [sometimes interpreted as a statement, sometimes as a question]. In the Bible, Michael the Archangel, at the head of the hosts of Heaven, cast Satan into Hell, and will sort souls at the Day of Judgment. The given name MICHAEL has also given rise to the surnames MITCHELL, MIGHELL, etc.

 

MICHEL (m): French form of MICHAEL.
MICHÈLE/MICHELLE (f): French feminine forms of MICHAEL.
MICHELE (m): Italian form of MICHAEL.


Spotlight: Monroe County, Michigan, Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Monroe in History, Michigan

The city of Monroe is the seat of Monroe County, located in the southeast corner of Michigan’s lower peninsula. The Monroe in History website is the result of a collaborative effort among three entities: Monroe County Community College, the Monroe County Museum/Historical Commission, and the Monroe County Historical Society. Its purpose is to be a resource “students and researchers can use in their studies, and to foster interest in local history.”

 

Historical Photographs
The photographs in this collection are from the Monroe County Historical Museum Archives. They are organized into categories: agriculture, bridges, churches and church buildings, clubs and teams, commercial buildings, government services, industry, lake and river, military, monuments, newspaper specials, people, residences, schools, streets, and transportation. To view a photograph, first click on the category link to open a new page with links to the individual photographs. Click the "Back" link to return to the page with links to the photographs. The large jpeg image may be downloaded to your computer, if you are not able to view the PDF files by clicking on the link. You must have a photo-editing program to print the images.

 

Civil War Letters
The letters and other written materials in this collection are from the Monroe County Historical Museum Archives. The writings of thirteen individuals are represented here. Sometimes there are several letters authored by a single individual, other times there is only a single letter. The letters are available in two formats. They may be opened as PDF or as jpeg image files. The documents may be downloaded and printed.

 

Index to Images and Letters
An index to the complete collection of images and letters has been provided on the website to enable you to quickly find items. Click on the links in the index list to open them.

 

Genealogy Collection, Monroe County Public Library, Michigan

A number of resources are available on the library’s website. In addition to Monroe County resources, there are a couple from the bordering area of Ohio. Scroll down to the section titled ‘Resources Available @ MCPL’ to access them.

 

Bygones of Monroe
This section contains transcriptions of articles from Monroe County area newspapers. The ange of subjects covered by the articles include social gatherings, such as the Annual Muskrat Banquet (where nearly 1,800 muskrats were eaten), obituaries, reports of Civil War era activities and actions, and Circuit Court reports.

 

Laurent Durocher Account Books
This resource is the alphabetical index to the account books of Laurent Durocher, who was active in the founding of Frenchtown, which became known as Monroe. It covers a thirty year period, from May 1, 1812, to February 24, 1842. The volume begins with family vital statistics information. The remainder covers Durocher’s “merchant business, banker, postage, tavern business and legal work.”

 

War of 1812 Veterans Buried in Monroe County
The list of fifty veterans of the War of 1812 buried throughout Monroe County was published in the April 17, 1951, edition of the Monroe Evening News. It was prepared from cemetery and war records and local histories.

 

Indexes
There are a number of indexes on the website, including:

Itemizer Surname Index; a surname index to the Itemizer, a Monroe newspaper that covered the societal happenings of the area, for the years 1877 and 1878.

 

Marion Child’s Interviews: Monroe resident Marion Child conducted interviews with elderly county residents during the late 1950s and early 1960s. The index is organized by topic and copies of the information may be ordered from the library.

 

There are two obituary indexes. One is an alphabetical index to the Monroe Commercial for the period from 1870 through 1873, plus 1878. It contains the name of the deceased, date of the obituary and page and column numbers. The other is an alphabetical index to the Wood County Sentinel newspaper, which was published in Bowling Green, Ohio. It covers the period from 1867 through 1876. The data fields include name, city, death date, age, obituary date, and page and column numbers.

 

There is an index to St. Mary’s Catholic Church baptism records for the period 1830 – 1839. The data fields in this index include the name of the individual being baptized, both parents’ full names, date of birth, and page number.

 

The Mount Carmel Cemetery is located in Toledo, Ohio. It is one of Toledo’s oldest Catholic Cemeteries, dating back to 1845. This database is an alphabetical surname index, which contains the section and lot number as well. The cemetery records have been microfilmed.

 

In addition you will find a list of Monroe County cemeteries and local newspapers, as well as information on tombstone carvings and their meanings.


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