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Records for the Boston Consumptive Home in the 1880s.

(Boston, Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

My ancestor Charles L. Pease died in Boston in 1880 at the Boston Consumptive Home according to his death record.  Can you tell me if NEHGS has any records for this institution or where the records might be?

 

Answer:

The Boston Consumptive Home may be in fact the Dr. Cullis Consumptive Home which was operating in the late 19th century in Boston.  This organization only took uncurable patients, and according to one study kept no records. www.homeoint.org/books3/hospital/registered.htm

 

If this in fact was a Boston institution you may wish to contact the Boston City Archives, as they have records for many city managed facilities, schools, etc.  You can reach them via email: Archives@cityofboston.gov, or by phone 617-635-1195. 


Where was the South Ground Cemetery in Boston?

(Boston, Cemeteries) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:
I have a question if you don't mind. I found two death records in the LDS Boston deaths 1646-1895 microfilms which refer to the "South Ground". These were burials in 1833 and 1843. One was listed as "5 South Ground in a brick tomb" (according to the record he belonged to the "City Poor" and the other was buried at "113 South Ground". Any idea where this cemetery might be?

 

Answer:

“The South Ground” is just one of the names referring to the South End Cemetery, also known as Franklin Square Cemetery. This closed cemetery was originally opened in 1810, and is located at Washington Street and East Newton Street in Boston’s South End.  Some of the inscriptions for this cemetery were recorded in the book Gravestone Inscriptions and Records of Tomb Burials in the Central Burying Ground, Boston, Common, and Inscriptions in the South Burying Ground, Boston (Salem, MA, 1917).  NEHGS has this book available under call # F73/61/C3/C6/1917.  However in the case of South Burying Ground you refer to numbers 5, and 113.  These are tombs and the tomb doors generally have a number or family surnames of the owner.  Since tomb ownership does tend to change, the name of all occupants will not be represented on the tomb door. This cemetery is locked to prevent vandalism; however you can call the Mount Hope Cemetery 617-635-7361 to arrange the cemetery to be opened if you wish.


Great Migration Series and Pilgrim Migration

(Massachusetts, Vital Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

I am new to genealogy and I would like to know what the difference between a Great Migration database ancestor, and one that appears in the Pilgrim Migration both by Robert C. Anderson.

 

Answer:

If you have an ancestor who lived in Plymouth Colony between 1620 and 1633 they would be associated with both the Pilgrim Migration - Immigrants to Plymouth Colony 1620-1633 (NEHGS, 2004), and the Great Migration Database and published series.  However if your ancestors were not Plymouth Colony residents, yet arrived in New England between 1620-1635 they would be part of the Great Migration series being published by NEHGS.


Where was Roxbury Canada located in Massachusetts?

(Massachusetts, Deeds) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

Can you explain to me where the location of "Roxbury Canada". I found this recently on a record actually and I am not sure where it actually is now or was located?

 

Answer:

The town of Warwick, Massachusetts was incorporated in 1742.  Before incorporation the area know as Warwick was known as "Gardner's Township", "Mount Grace" , and "Roxbury-Canada". 


Place name location within Plymouth County, Massachusetts

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

In a letter I have from the 1850's my ancestor speaks of farming in a place in Massachusetts I have never heard of.  Can you tell me how I might be able to determine where, or where was a place called "Antasawamack Neck"? 

 

Answer:

The place you mentioned I believe is the ancient name of a place in Plymouth County in the town of Mattapoisett.  This town itself was created in 1857 from the town of Rochester, Mass.  Within the boundaries of Mattapoisett is a region known as Antaassawomock Neck, which I believe is the location you are referring to.  The source for this reference comes from the following publication I use for reference: Historical Data Relating to Counties, Cities and Towns in Massachusetts (Boston, NEHGS, 1997).


Researching a physician in your family tree

(NEHGS) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

I am a new member with a question regarding schooling. How might I learn where my great grandfather an MD, went to medical school?  I know his dates and locations, but don't know where to begin this search.

 

Answer:

I would suggest searching for an obituary for him first off.  Often this source will reveal the educational background relating to a particular school might be noted.  Sadly there is no master index of all known medical school graduates.  We do have a book called the The Deceased Physicians Directory (1804-1929).  If he died after 1929, the following address may assist you further for your great-grandfather.  They maintain an archives for the American Medical Association at this facility.

 

 The National Library of Medicine
History of Medicine Division
Building 38, Room 1E-21
8600 Rockville Place
Bethesda, Maryland 20894
(301) 402-8878
E-mail:
hmdref@nlm.nih.gov


Early Families of Maine

(Lineage Societies and Fraternal Organizations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

 

I understand that in recent years a new hereditary society was founded concerning early families who settled in Maine.  Can you tell me if this is true?  Also what are the requirements and how do I contact them.

 

Answer:

 

The organization is called Order of the First Families of Maine.  According to their website membership is “extended to men and women 18 years of age or older who are lineal descendants of an ancestor who was a resident of, owned land in, or was the chief proprietor of a business between 1604 and 1652 within the boundaries of present day Maine.”  A partial listing of acceptable ancestors can be found online at: http://offme.homestead.com/ancestors.html

 

The cost associated to become a life member is $200, plus and application fee of $40.

They can be reached via email karen@averymiller.com

 

     


Wentworth New Hampshire Cemetery and Land Records

(Cemeteries, New Hampshire) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

Do you know if any graveyard records exist of early residents in Wentworth, New Hampshire? Also, where would I go to search Probate and land records of early Wentworth, N.H. 

  

Answer: 

If you are looking for pre-1771 Wentworth probate and deeds you will want to search Rockingham County Probate.  If it is after 1771 you want to search the county of Grafton of .  We have both early Provincial probates and deeds for Rockingham, and the later Grafton records you would need on microfilm.   .?  I have examined George F. Plummer's History of the Town of Wentworth New Hampshire (Concord, NH, 1930) which makes mentions the Village Cemetery which may be one of the earlier in the community. I would also suggest contacting the Wentworth Public Library (603) -764-5818, do keep in mind they have very limited hours of operation. 

  


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