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The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Paul

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

PAUL (m): Despite the great debt both the Catholic and Protestant churches owe to St. Paul the Apostle (d. [69]), this name enjoyed surprisingly little currency in colonial New England, perhaps due to its Catholic and/or Anglican connotations. Paul Dudley (1675–1751) was the son of Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire Governor Joseph Dudley and his wife, Rebecca (Tyng). Paul Terrill, b. Woodbury, Conn. 1 Feb. 1721, was the son of Ezra and ____ Terrill (William Cothren, History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut 3:18).

The Daily Genealogist: Update on Historic Pittsburgh

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Update on Historic Pittsburgh

The Historic Pittsburgh website, managed and hosted by the University of Pittsburgh's Digital Research Library, allows users to explore the archival and manuscript collections of a number of Pittsburgh-area cultural heritage institutions. Its collections have grown since I first profiled this site in 2005. They now include:

Full-Text Collection: This collection contains over 1,200 works from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and includes the Historic Pittsburgh General Text Collection (general histories and historical overviews) and historic Pittsburgh city directories published between 1815 and 1945. Enter a keyword in the search box to execute a Quick Search of the collections. Click on the “More search options” link to open a new page with advanced options for searching the collections. With the basic search you can search the database for keywords found in the full text, author name, work’s title, or subject. Boolean, proximity, and bibliographic searches are also available. Your search history is recorded under the History tab. Click on the collection’s title link to open a new page with an option to browse through the complete list of books. The General Text collection can be browsed by author or by title. The City Directories collection can be browsed by date or by title.

Maps Collection: There are five series of maps in the Historic Pittsburgh Maps collection. These include:

Darlington Digital Library Maps: More than seventy maps “created in the mid-18th through early-20th centuries [that] depict Pittsburgh or Allegheny County, including maps of Fort Pitt, plans of Pittsburgh, maps of Pittsburgh and Allegheny cities, Bird's-eye maps of Carnegie, Duquesne, Glassport, Homestead, and other western Pennsylvania cities.”

G. M. Hopkins Company Maps, 1872–1940: More than 1,800 map plates from forty-seven volumes are available in this collection. Originally published by the G. M. Hopkins Company, the maps cover the greater Pittsburgh area from 1872 to 1940 and show lot and block numbers, dimensions, street widths, and names of property owners, as well as churches, cemeteries, mills, schools, roads, and railroads. The collection is searchable by street name, building name, and building type. You can download map plate images as 200 dpi JPEG files for noncommercial and educational purposes. Reproductions of the map plates are available for purchase.

Warrantee Atlas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1914: Shows original land grants that settlers in what is now Allegheny County received from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Includes the name of the grantee, the date the land was warranted and surveyed, the property dimensions, and patent information. The atlas can be browsed by plate number or the last name of the original owner. You can download map plate images as 200 dpi JPEG files. Reproductions of the maps are available for purchase.

 

Historic Pittsburgh Image Collections: Offers access to nearly 28,000 visual images from 59 collections held by eleven Pittsburgh-area institutions. Click on the Explore link to browse by theme, time, location, or collection. Themes include Pittsburgh at Work, Pittsburgh at Play, Pittsburgh at Home, and Pittsburgh Personalities. You can execute a quick search by entering a keyword in the search box on the Images main page. Click on the Search link to access the site’s advanced search capabilities. Keyword searches of the image database are limited to image title, creator, description date, subject, image identifier, or file name. Searches can be restricted to a particular collection or set of collections.

Other resources include census schedules for Pittsburgh for 1850–1880 and Allegheny County for 1850–1870, an online chronology of Pittsburgh from 1717 through 2011, and brief film clips by a local filmmaker, Bill Beal, that document Pittsburgh life between 1968 and 1983.


The Daily Genealogist: House History Stories

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey on whether readers ever researched a house history prompted a number of readers to share their stories.

Joan Schacht of Chesterfield, Missouri:
When my daughter purchased a house in St. Louis, I discovered that city records stated it was built in 1910, but city directories and Sanborn maps listed the lot as empty until 1951. The all-brick house appeared to be about 100 years old but the cinder block basement didn’t seem to fit. After spending six hours researching at city hall, I learned it was the house that was out of place. The house was moved from a location across the street onto a new foundation in 1950. Now I get to research the history of the house on its original plot, and I have already learned online that the 1950 sellers had purchased the house in 1912.

Jane Potyondy of Contoocook, New Hampshire:
I remember doing a project in high school tracing the history of my 1830 home in Winchester, Massachusetts. We had in our possession the original floor plans, copies of the bills for labor costs and building supplies, and more. My mother and I went to the county courthouse in Cambridge where we pored through all the grantor/grantee books, tracing the ownership of the house. Paging through the old tomes, looking through the stacks . . . perhaps this was what triggered my interest in tracing the family. I had forgotten about this until you posed the question. Thanks for the memory!

Gene Hullinghorst of Ann Arbor, Michigan:
The Collins C. Diboll Vieux Carré Digital Survey, a project of The Historic New Orleans Collection, allows users to search for the history, images, and prior owners of structures and lots in the French Quarter, from the French colonial period to the present. Unfortunately, my ancestors did not own a building in the Quarter but other family members did.

Renee Pizzo of Scappose, Oregon:
We are only the fourth owners of our 1885 house in Columbia County, Oregon. The granddaughter of the second owner lives down the road, and was born in the house across the road from ours. Our road was even named after the original owner of the house. In 2010, when we purchased and refurbished the house, we found several interesting items — newspapers from 1928, shipping labels addressed to the second owner for linoleum shipped to the house, and a tintype of an unidentified young man — in the wall below a window. As time permits, I will continue my research.


The Daily Genealogist: G.I. [Grand Island] Women Travel Central Nebraska to Find Graves

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Two genealogy enthusiasts go “cemetery hopping” to fulfill requests from FindAGrave.com users.

The Daily Genealogist: Atlantan’s Search for Roots Leads to Germany, Czech Town

 Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A genealogist traces his obscure surname (and family history) back to Germany.

The Daily Genealogist: A Treasure Trove of Old Maps at Your Fingertips

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A Smithsonian blog reports that “the United States Geological Survey, headquartered in Reston, Virginia, is about to complete a massive project to digitize its cache of approximately 200,000 historic topographic maps.”

The Weekly Genealogist Survey: The age of your home

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you had researched a house history. The results are:

49%, No, I have never researched a house history.
32%, Yes, I have researched the history of at least one house that I did not live in.
31%, Yes, I have researched the history of at least one house I lived in.

This week's survey asks you the age of your current residence. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Spotlight: Carson City, Nevada

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Carson City, Nevada
Carson City is the capital of Nevada. It is located at about the midpoint on Nevada’s western border. The Carson City Clerk-Recorder’s Office has made available on its website a database comprising a number of resources. The original records from which the database was compiled are available in the Clerk-Recorder’s Office. Click on the "Browse Our Files" bar to open the search page and view the following records:

Birth Records
Birth records from 1867 through 1957 are indexed under both the parents’ names and that of the child. If the children do not have first names, they are listed as son or daughter.

Death Records
Death records from 1887 through 1957 include coroner's report records, burial records, physicians' certificates of death, and other types of documents.

Public Health Officer Reporting
The records in the index contain data from the Public Health Officer reports from 1911 through 1941. The County’s Public Health Officer was required to file a monthly report related to the health status of the county. These reports included monthly listings of births, deaths, burial and removal permits, diseases, and other health conditions, such as identified epidemics or contagious diseases.

Citizenship Documents
This database covers the period from 1868 through 1926. Sources include Declarations of Intention, Oaths of Loss of Declaration of Intention, Oaths of Minority, Oaths of Allegiance, and Certificates of Citizenship.

Cemetery Indexing
This database contains the names of people buried at Lone Mountain Cemetery and Empire Cemetery from 1850 to the present. The detailed records in the database do not name the cemetery in which the individual is buried, just the plot location. Click here for more information about Lone Mountain Cemetery and other Carson City cemeteries.

The Carson City Clerk-Recorder’s Office database can be searched by surname or date. You may enter a partial surname to include spelling variations in the results. For the date search you must enter month, day, and year. Searches may be limited by record type. Unusual names have been indexed as written. For example, there is a death record for "One Arm Jim (Indian)" who died in 1915 at age 109. A description of how Chinese names have been indexed is provided.

The data fields in the search results include name, person type, document type, and date. "Person type" may include status information such as parent(s), child, deceased, and citizen. Click on the "Open" button on the left to view the detailed record. The data fields in the "details" record include file number, document type, reference location, document date, and comments. The information found in the "reference location" field includes volume and page numbers for original records and cemetery plot locations. The "comments" field contains information such as age at death, birth and death dates for cemetery records, country of origin, and date of birth on a Declaration of Intention.


The Daily Genealogist: Debunking Family Myths

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked readers if they had ever debunked a family myth. About 70% had, and several readers shared their stories.

Mary Brochu of Hardwick, Vermont:
I was always told that my great-grandmother left her husband, took their ten kids, and immigrated to the U.S. from Canada at the turn of the century. She settled in Vermont and died of pneumonia a few years later — leaving children ranging in age from five to eighteen alone. The younger children were "farmed out" to relatives and neighbors while the older boys lived in boarding houses. Imagine my surprise when I was browsing the 1900 census and found the entire family — father, mother, children, and grandmother — all living in Vermont in the same house! When I approached my mother's cousin with this information, she insisted that it was wrong, that the father never came to the U.S. I even showed her the mother's obituary stating that the entire family came from Canada in 1899. My cousin never believed that the father ever came to the U.S. with his family — until her dying day!

Jennifer Thurber Willis of Cincinnati, Ohio:
I have debunked more than a few family myths in the ten years since I began researching our family, and nobody is too happy about it! Especially the myth — apparently believed by many descendants — that early New Jersey settler Albrecht Zabriskie was descended from the noble Sobieski family of Poland. (My grandmother wrote an article that was published in the Paramus, N.J., newspaper in 1925 containing this "fact.") Also, it turns out our Thurbers did not have a firearm business with Ethan Allen's family — instead an Ethan Allen possibly completely unrelated to THE Ethan Allen did have a gun manufacturing business with another branch of the Thurber family in the 19th century. But these and other “losses” have been offset with new discoveries so, all in all, I would say we are about even.


The Daily Genealogist: Like this Abilene Couple, Trace Home ‘Genealogy’ with Property Records

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

This article includes useful tips for researching a house history.

The Daily Genealogist: Op-Ed: Jewish Groups Must Preserve Vital Records

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor


The Daily Genealogist: Earliest Americans Arrived in Waves, DNA Study Finds

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A new DNA study reveals that a main migration which populated the entire Americas was followed by two further smaller migrations. The study vindicates a 1987 proposal made on linguistic grounds by Joseph Greenberg, the great classifier of the world’s languages.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: House Histories

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you had ever debunked a family myth. The results are:

69%, Yes, I have debunked a family myth.
31%, No, I have not debunked a family myth.

This week's survey asks if you have ever researched a house history. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Arphaxad/Arpachshad

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ARPHAXAD/ARPACHSHAD (m): What inspired Samuel and Abigail (Tidd) Thompson of Woburn, Mass. (parents of Samuel, Abigail, Mary, Jonathan and [later] Leonard) to name their third son Arphaxad Thompson (Woburn, Mass. 7 March 1763-15 Dec. 1771) (Woburn VRs 1:257, 2:190, 3:276) for the “third son of Shem [son of the patriarch Noah], and a remote ancestor of Abraham, according to Genesis and I Chronicles” (Clarence D. Barnhart, William D. Halsey et al., eds., The New Century Cyclopedia of Names [New York, 1954], 1:226), is not now clear, especially since “ARPACHSHAD is not necessarily a single person. From the structure of the genealogical tables the name may be that of a tribe or land of which the people were descendants from that son of Shem. The name long referred to the mountainous country on the Upper Zab, north and east of Nineveh, called by the Greek geographers ARRAPACHITIS (Gen. 10:24, 11:10)” (ibid.). The Biblically-associated names SHEM and NOAH [father and grandfather of the Biblical Arphaxad] were not used among the Woburn Thompsons, which may only deepen the mystery as to why this obscure name was chosen.

The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Leaphe/Leafy

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

LEAPHE/LEAFY (f): A nickname formed from Puritan "virtue-name" RELIEF. The 1850 census shows seventy-five women named Leafy, mostly in New England and New York. The oldest was Leafy Waters (b. Massachusetts abt. 1782) of Milford, Otsego County, New York, and the youngest was Leafy Willson (b. Ohio 1850) of Suffield, Portage County, Ohio.

The Daily Genealogist Spotlight: Burlington Public Library, Iowa

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Burlington Public Library, Iowa

The city of Burlington is the county seat of Des Moines County, which is located in southeastern Iowa. The Burlington Public Library has made a number of genealogical resources available on its website, including the following:

Cemeteries
Click the first link in this section for an alphabetical list of cemeteries in Des Moines County. The second link is to cemetery databases on the Iowa GenWeb website. There are ninety-one cemeteries in this online collection. Scroll to the bottom of the page to view a list of alternate names of some cemeteries.

Click the cemetery name to view collected information, which may include a description of the cemetery and its history, a list of individuals buried there, photographs, and census images. The burials databases may include surname, first name, birth, death, and notes. The notes field includes spouse and parent names, number of years the individual was married, age of the deceased, place of birth, military service, and description of gravestone. A camera icon in the “notes” field links to a photograph of the gravestone.

Newspapers
There are three newspaper databases on the website. The second [Burlington] Hawk Eye index, covering the 1830s to 1897, is likely the most useful for family history researchers. This database indexes birth, marriage, and death notices from local newspapers. You can search the database by name. If you would like to limit your search to a particular event type or a specific date of publication, click “more search options.” In addition, you can browse the alphabetical index by clicking the first letter of the surname. The data fields in the index include full name, event (birth, marriage, or death), newspaper title, date of publication, and page number. Copies of newspaper articles may be ordered from the library.

The Hawk Eye database covering 1985 to the present indexes articles and photographs appearing in the newspaper, but does not contain birth, marriage, or death notices. (I was not able to connect to this index.) The third newspaper link connects researchers to the Hawk Eye Online Archives. Full-text articles may be purchased for a fee.

Photographs
The library provides a link to “Daily Life Along the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad,” a searchable collection of more than 700 photographs, including more than sixty of Burlington during the 1940s, on the Newberry Library website. Click the image to view an enlarged photograph or detailed information.

In addition, you will find on this website a list of the Civil War units raised in Des Moines County.


The Daily Genealogist Note from the Editor: The R. Stanton Avery Special Collections (and more free eBooks)

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

This week we continue an occasional feature designed to familiarize readers with the many departments at NEHGS. This week’s profile of Special Collections is written by department director Timothy Salls.

The NEHGS Special Collections consists of the Society's manuscript holdings, visual materials, and institutional archives. Named in 2008 for R. Stanton Avery (1907–1997), the department is staffed by Manager of Manuscript Collections Timothy Salls; Archivist Judith Lucey; Archives Assistant Robert Shaw; and Special Collections Assistant Sally Benny; as well as a dedicated team of volunteers and college interns.

The NEHGS R. Stanton Avery Special Collections complements the print, microform, and electronic holdings of the Society’s Research Library by collecting, organizing, preserving, and providing access to manuscripts and visual material that support the research of American families and local history. A manuscript is an unpublished manually produced document such as a handwritten letter, Bible record, or a diary. The Society's holdings of visual materials include photographs, prints, broadsides, and other graphics.

Donations to the Special Collections are solicited through articles and announcements in American Ancestors magazine and website, staff discussions with patrons; lectures; and the Preserving New England Records initiative led by Ralph Crandall. Recently some capital raised through the Society’s "Connecting Families, Advancing History" campaign has been used to establish a new fund to acquire manuscripts, visual materials, and other items that enhance the Society holdings. 

Appraisals of potential donations to ensure a fit with the Society’s collection guidelines are usually accomplished by email or telephone. Some appraisals require the staff to travel and review the items in person. Although most donations are either delivered or shipped to NEHGS, special collections staff have traveled to various locations throughout New England to pack and transfer collections to NEHGS. Once the manuscript arrives at NEHGS, an acknowledgement letter and deed of gift (for primary source material) are produced for the donor. A deed of gift transfers intellectual and physical ownership to NEHGS, which is necessary for the long-term stewardship of a collection.

Discrete manuscript items that fit in a single archival folder are immediately placed in the queue for cataloging. Large collections are sent to an offsite storage facility until retrieved and assigned to an intern or staff member for processing. Processing prepares collections for researcher access while supporting their long-term survival. The collection is arranged in a logical and useful order, if one does not already exist, and a collection guide is produced. A list of finding aids available through the library database catalog (as well as manuscript items with images in the digital archive) is available on our website. Once the finding aid is completed, a catalog record for the collection is produced for the OCLC WorldCat database and NEHGS library database catalog.

NEHGS members may request manuscripts at the reference desk, Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The reference desk staff member or volunteer calls the Special Collections office for the items to be pulled and brought to the reading room for the patron, assists with use of the collection, supervises the proper handling of documents, and records details concerning the manuscript’s use.

Access to the R. Stanton Avery Special Collections is a benefit of NEHGS membership. For more information on the Special Collections, please visit our website or email Tim Salls.

* * *

eBooks update

In response to the June 27 article by George McKinney on “Free eBooks for Genealogy Research,” two Weekly Genealogist readers shared their own recommendations for eBook sources.

Mollie Lynch of Clarkston, Michigan:
As a retired librarian, I needed a hobby and wanted to assist people doing genealogical research so I started genealogybooklinks.com. I began locating and providing links to freely available digital books, focusing on American biographies, genealogies, and history books. Today there are over 30,000 links from more than 35 sources (only the top sources are listed on the site). The current focus is on surnames, directories, vital records, and identifying smaller sites with local area-specific books. 

Dee Grimsrud, a retired Wisconsin Historical Society archivist from Madison, Wisconsin:
The Wisconsin Historical Society has numerous county histories scanned, searchable, and free.


The Daily Genealogist: Genealogists Index Norwalk Marriage and Death Records

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

“Over the course of several years, Keroack and two other members of the Connecticut Ancestry Society indexed Norwalk marriage and death records for the years 1848 until 1861, moving from old, bound and handwritten books to printed, alphabetized volumes the names of Norwalk's most famous and least famous families, and all those in between.”

The Daily Genealogist: The Author of the Civil War

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Sir Walter Scott not only dominated gift book lists on the eve of the Civil War but also dominated Southern literary taste throughout the conflict.”

The Daily Genealogist: Permanent Record. Entry 8

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Permanent Record. Entry 8: The Saddest Story in the Report Cards I Found—And How It Came to Have a Happy Ending.
The latest in Paul Lukas’s “Permanent Record” series, in which he researches the women listed in the Manhattan Trade School for Girls report cards. The first post in the series discusses how he saved these records from destruction, and why they captured his interest.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Debunking a family myth

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked if any of your ancestors were living in the thirteen American colonies on July 4, 1776. The results are:

92%, Yes.
8%, No.

This week's survey asks if your research has debunked a family myth. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Liberty

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

LIBERTY (usually m): Even before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, idealistic parents who suspected they were living in historic times named children (mostly boys, but the occasional girl) for the precious concept of freedom. Dr. James Potter of New Fairfield, Conn., had a son Libertas Potter (1769–1770) (whose name, the Latin nominative singular for liberty, was botched in transcription to “Libartis” in C.E. Potter, The Potter Genealogies [1888], section five, #98). After the Lexington Alarm, the name became popular as fathers and older brothers marched off to battle. Some other bearers of the name, seen in Bellingham, Mass., were Liberty Partridge, b. Bellingham, Mass. 13 Jan. 1776, son of Joseph and Catherine (Richardson) Partridge (Bellingham, Mass., VRs to 1850, p. 51); a Westminster, Mass., person of this name m. Bellingham 31 Jan. 1814 Rachel Holbrook (Bellingham VRs, p. 132). Liberty Bates, b. Bellingham 16 July 1775, was a son of Laban and Olive (Wheelock) Bates (Bellingham VRs, p. 14). The name was, of course, not confined to Bellingham. Liberty Judd, son of Philip and Mary (Peters) Judd, was born August 27, 1775 in Hebron, Connecticut; he married Abigail Everest and moved to Genesee Co., N.Y. 

(Fortunately for bearers of this name, the Patriot cause prevailed.)


The Daily Genealogist Spotlight: Idaho Cemetery and Obituary Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie BeaudraultGooding County Historical Society, Idaho
Assistant Editor

Idaho Cemetery and Obituary Databases

City of Nampa, Idaho

The city of Nampa is located in Canyon County on the western border of Idaho. To assist genealogical researchers the city has placed a cemetery database on its website. Click on the “I Agree” link at the end of the application disclaimer to open a new page and access the database.

The database may be searched by first name, middle and last name, date of birth (range of years), date of death (range of years), interment date (range of years), and burial location (section, lot, and space). Click on the map link to download a map of the cemetery. The file is in PDF format. You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it.

The data fields in the search results include full name, section, lot space, photo available, birth, death, and interment date. Click on the word SELECT in the first column to view a detailed record, which also includes the name of the undertaker, GSP coordinates, and a photo of the gravestone, if available.

In addition to the general burial search there are search pages for veterans and citizens of distinction. For the veterans’ search there are a number of check boxes which will help you narrow your search by rank, branch, war, honors, and more. Citizens of distinction may be searched by type, including: centenarian citizens, died on birthday, Nampa’s fallen heroes, Daughters of the American Revolution, and notables. Both the veterans and citizens of distinction categories contain additional information about the deceased, including articles and obituaries that have been uploaded to the website. Please note that the files are in PDF format.

Gooding County Historical Society, Idaho

Gooding County is located in south central Idaho. The Gooding County Historical Society has made a collection of obituaries available on its website. The online obituary collection is a work in progress with new indexes being added each year. Currently, the years covered are 1946, 1947, and 1980 through 2011. For the earlier years the data fields are surname, given name, age, sex, date of birth, date of death, military status, and residence. For the later indexes there are additional fields: place of interment and details regarding military service — branch, war, and rank. The historical society will provide you with a copy of an obituary for a small fee.

Twin Rivers Genealogy Society (TRGS), Idaho

Twin Rivers Genealogy Society is located in Lewiston, Idaho. Lewiston, in the northwestern part of the state, is the county seat of Nez Perce County. Many of the obituaries in this online collection were taken from old scrapbooks that were saved from being thrown away. The individuals memorialized in these obituaries had connections to Lewiston, Idaho; Clarkston, Washington; and “outlying areas.” As noted on the website, in cases where the full obituary is not listed due to privacy restrictions, you will have to contact the TRGS webmaster to request a copy of the complete obituary.

Click on the first letter of the surname of the person whose obituary you are seeking. This will open a new page with a list of names. Select a name from the list and click on the link to open a new page containing a transcription of that individual’s obituary. If two obituaries were published, both will appear on the page. If the newspaper title and/or date of publication are known they follow the obituary text.


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Ariel

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ARIEL (m/f) (Hebrew ‘lion of God’): (1) An emissary of Ezra (Ez. 8:16); (2) a symbolic name for Jerusalem used by the prophet Isaiah [James Strong, The New Strong’s Expanded Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible (2010), p. 27]. The meaning “lion of God,” by extension, gives this name a connotation of heroism. While it is seen most often in present-day American use as a female name, ARIEL was a male name in colonial times and before, as witness the character in Shakespeare’s Tempest, whose name may also be derived from the Hebrew. Ariel Ballou (1715–1791) of Cumberland, R.I., and wife Jerusha Slack had son Ariel Ballou, Jr. (1758–1839), father of a numerous progeny (Adin Ballou, An Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America, pp. 71, 155). The name was used several times elsewhere in the Ballou family as well. ARIEL is still seen as a male name in Hebrew. Ariel Sharon (b. 1928) served as eleventh Prime Minister of Israel from 2001 to 2006.

The Daily Genealogist: Digital Cameras and Genealogy

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

This week we present an interesting article by NEHGS member Philip Hermann of Melrose, Mass., on using digital cameras for genealogical purposes.

Digital Cameras and Genealogy
by Philip Hermann

Today’s genealogist is faced with the challenge of digitally storing records. I have tried to use limited financial resources on equipment that will perform a variety of tasks — such as copying vital records and photographing tombstones. I started looking at cameras as a way of preserving important information. 

Some genealogical applications of a good camera:

1. Tombstone photos — Early morning or evening provides the best light for pictures of tombstones. Make sure to check both the front and back of the tombstone since there could be information on both sides. I also take pictures of the name of the cemetery at the front gate and the plot markers to help identify the tombstone location. You can use www.findagrave.com to make a virtual memorial at no cost.

2. Photos of documents — Preserve significant documents such as vital records, newspaper articles, mass cards, and school records by photographing and downloading them to a computer photo storage program such as Picasa. This free program allows the user to manipulate a duplicate of the photo without permanently altering the original. I use the text function to write names and dates on the copy of the photo.

3. Photos of photos — Many of my old photos are stored in albums with “magnetic pages.” The adhesive chemicals in these pages speed the rate of deterioration. All printed photographs are affected by handling, light, moisture, and chemicals. Digital storage of photographs on computers and portable memory devices will preserve them for future generations. When photographing photos, I find it helps to use a table lamp to provide lighting from different directions.

4. Family History — Use your camera to record the current members of your family. At family reunions, take pictures of the different generations. After downloading the images, use your photo program to label the names of family members.

My requirements for a camera would include the following:

1. Less than $300 and easy to use
2. Takes pictures in low light (in archives and libraries)
3. Fits into my pocket (I hate carrying equipment.)
4. Image stabilization function (reduces blurring)
5. Excellent close-up functionality
6. Large LCD screen display (3 inches)
7. Preview photos quickly on LCD screen
8. Useful for different types of shots (indoor and outdoor)
9. Easy process to download to computer
10. MP greater than 10MP (# of mega pixels = greater detail, larger prints) 

There are some outstanding digital cameras on the market that will meet all these requirements, including the Nikon Coolpix P310 Digital Camera, which features 16.1 MP (excellent detail), ultra-fast f/1.8 aperture glass lens for low light, and handheld image stabilization. There are other manufacturers that make good, easy to use cameras. Search the web particularly for cameras that take high quality pictures in low light. These cameras are constantly improving and their prices are decreasing!


The Daily Genealogist: From Basement to Battlefields and Beyond

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

After finding a large framed photograph of a World War soldier I in a storage room at the University of Regina, Professor Mark Brigham rescued it from being discarded and conducted a search for family members. He recently presented the picture to a descendant in Toronto. (An earlier story, which appeared before the descendant was located,provides additional details about the search.)

The Daily Genealogist: War Baby Whose Father Had St. Louis Connection Finally Gets Answers

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Norman Spencer of Wales tracked down information about the American father he’d never known, a U.S. W.W. II army airman.

The Daily Genealogist: Eat, Drink, Cook: Elizabeth Gilbert on her Family’s Culinary Inheritance

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

This spring the author discovered her great-grandmother’s cookbook, At Home on the Range, published in 1947.

The Daily Genealogist: ‘Old Ironsides,’ 200 Years Later

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A profile of the USS Constitution, commissioned in 1794, which earned the ‘Old Ironsides’ nickname during the War of 1812.

The Weekly Genealogist Survey: 1776 Ancestors

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you are a member of NEHGS. The results are:

85%, Yes, I am a member of NEHGS.
15%, No, I am not a member of NEHGS.

This week's survey asks if any of your ancestors were living in the thirteen American colonies on July 4, 1776. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Zeruiah/Zerviah

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ZERUIAH / ZERVIAH: (Zeruiah is the original name but in earlier centuries U and V — if not pronounced alike — were often written with the same letter, thus ZERVIAH [zer-VYE-ah or zer-VEE-ah] is also seen.) A ZERUAH was the mother of King Jeroboam I, but the American colonial name seems to be derived from an earlier woman, King David’s sister ZERUIAH, mother of Joab, Abishai, and Asahel. Jeroboam’s mother’s name is derived from the Hebrew for “having a skin disease” (which, one would think, might limit its popularity), while David’s sister’s name means “YHWH [God] has let flow” (Carol Meyers, Toni Craven and Ross S. Kraemer, eds., Women and Scripture: A Dictionary of Named and Unnamed Women in the Hebrew Bible, the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books, and the New Testament (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 2000), p. 168).

Zerviah Gould, born 15 April 1780, recorded in Cumberland, R.I., was the eighth child of Jabez Gould and Esther Sweetland who were married in Attleboro, 2 September 1766. Zerviah was likely named for her mother's sister, Zerviah Sweetland. Jabez, who was of Wrentham, Mass., at the time of the Revolution, removed to Hallowell, Maine, in 1787, and later settled in Belgrade, Maine. “Sophia" Gould married (intention) 26 April 1808, Fayette, Maine, Aaron Bachelder. In the 1850 census for Fayette, Sophia Bacheller is listed as age 69, born Massachusetts. A wider context of circumstantial evidence points to her being one and the same as Zerviah.

SOPHIA can be pronounced with either long or short “I,” depending on the time and the person, so one can see how the name Zerviah might have evolved into Sophia. “Sophia” [Greek for ‘wisdom’ and very popular from the middle/late eighteenth century] may have struck an individual Zerviah’s ear and seemed more fashionable than her own (phonetically somewhat similar) Biblical name. Context (how time, place, wider cultural, social and/or religious currents, and individual quirks combine) is everything with names. Ultimately, it hinges on that most mysterious factor, individual personal taste of long ago.


The Daily Genealogist Spotlight: Montana Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

The Missoula Cemetery, Missoula, Montana

The city of Missoula is located in western Montana. It is the county seat of Missoula County. A group of Missoula businessmen formed the Missoula Valley Improvement Company in December 1884. Not long thereafter land was surveyed for a cemetery. In 1901, the cemetery was sold to the city of Missoula. There have been nearly 21,000 burials in the cemetery. Missoula Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in the state.

Click on the first letter of the last name of the deceased to open a PDF file containing a list of all individuals buried in the cemetery whose surname begins with that letter. The data fields in the index include last name, first name, age, date of death, grave location (grave #, lot #, block #), and interment number. Please note that you will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the files. You may order a copy of the record by completing a Release Form. There is a link to the form on the Interment Listing page.

Parmly Billings Library, Billings, Montana

The City of Billings is located in south central Montana. It is the county seat of Yellowstone County. The Parmly Billings Library has made resources available on its website. They include the following:

Newspaper Indexes

There are two indexes to the Billings Gazette newspaper. The first is a vital statistics index of over 13,000 names, which covers the period from 1882 through 1902. It is organized alphabetically by last name. Click on the set of letters that includes the first letter of the surname of interest. The data fields in the index are full name, date, type of event, place, and newspaper title. As I looked through the index, I realized that it is an index of much more than just vital statistics. In addition to births, marriages, deaths (obituaries), and divorces, there are references to delinquent taxes, registered voters, students, naturalizations, business licenses, prisoners, pardons, and more. Please note that the index files are in PDF format and you will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the files.

The second Billings Gazette index covers 1930 through 1939. The typed index pages were scanned and uploaded to the site. The files are in PDF format. One file covers the entire period, and is extremely large. I had difficulty downloading it. There are three smaller files, each containing a portion of the index, that did not cause me any problems.

City Directories

The library has digitized and uploaded four Billings city directories for 1883, 1894, 1900–1901, and 1903–1904. These files are also in PDF format.

Petroleum County Cemeteries, Montana

Petroleum County is located in central Montana. Winnett is the county seat. It is about 95 miles north of Billings. According to the 2010 federal census, the county’s population was 494. This website contains a number of databases listing burials in Petroleum County cemeteries, including Ashley Cemetery, Flatwillow Cemetery, Shay Cemetery, Wallview Cemetery, Winnett Cemetery, and a number of private cemeteries. The data included in most records is full name, date of birth, and date of death. In some instances, there are photographs of the gravestones.


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