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The Daily Genealogist: More on Mehetabel

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

In the May 29 edition of The Weekly Genealogist, we featured an article by Michelle Marchetti Coughlin in the online journal Common-place about her research on Mehetabel Chandler Coit. Ms. Coughlin's 2012 book, One Colonial Woman's World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit, “reconstructs the life of Mehetabel Chandler Coit (1673-1758), the author of what may be the earliest surviving diary by an American woman.” Born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Coit moved to Woodstock, Connecticut, at the age of fourteen and permanently settled in New London, Connecticut, when she was twenty-one. (More information about Mehetabel Coit is available at OneColonialWomansWorld.com.) Coughlin's article described how she learned about Mehetabel's diary in an 1895 book and began a tenacious search for its whereabouts. I thought that Weekly Genealogist readers would appreciate this tale of successfully pursuing a centuries-old primary source.

A few days after The Weekly Genealogist was sent, I received an email from Ms. Coughlin, who is an NEHGS member and enews subscriber. She reported that she received several nice emails from enews readers — as well as a rather astonishing one from a Coit descendant who owns a letter-book purportedly kept by Mehetabel's mother, Elizabeth (Douglas) Chandler (1641–1705).

The Coit descendant is Eleanor Hoague of Seattle, Mehetabel's great-great-great-great-great granddaughter. Eleanor and her husband have preserved hundreds of letters and other manuscripts that were passed down lovingly from Coit to Coit. (Many of these letters have provided fodder for other genealogical works: Digging for Gold Without a Shovel: The Letters of Daniel Wadsworth Coit from Mexico City to San Francisco 1848-1851 and An Artist in El Dorado: The Drawings and Letters of Daniel Wadsworth Coit.)

Eleanor was thrilled to read the article about Mehetabel on the Common-place website, and she contacted Ms. Coughlin to let her know about the letter-book. Eleanor kindly sent Ms. Coughlin photographs of the eighteen pages of the letter-book, which dates to the late seventeenth century. Ms. Coughlin is now transcribing the letters. She will need to try to identify some of the senders and/or recipients, who are named only by initials, and who in some cases don't seem to have anything to do with Elizabeth Chandler.

Michelle Coughlin has pronounced this new find, “quirky but also fascinating.” I'm very pleased she has agreed to write an article that will present her findings for a future issue of American Ancestors magazine.


The Daily Genealogist: Send me a Postcard, Drop Me a Line

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Send Me a Postcard, Drop Me a Line
A New York Times op-ed contributor ruminates on the shift away from postcards and stamps.

The Daily Genealogist: Treat Living Persons with Discretion

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Treat Living Persons with Discretion
Newspaper columnist Betty Malesky advises genealogists to be thoughtful and respectful when including living relatives in genealogies.

The Daily Genealogist: How Ashkenazi Are You?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

How Ashkenazi Are You? Tapping into Genetic Secrets Online
“A growing number of non-Jews [have become] fascinated with the discovery of a Jewish ancestor's footprints in their DNA, thanks to testing that has become much more affordable — $99 or $199, depending on the company — than it had been only a few years ago.”

The Daily Genealogist: Michigan Message in a Bottle Mystery Solved

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Michigan Message in a Bottle Mystery Solved
A note in a bottle tossed into a Michigan river nearly 100 years ago caught the attention of many people, including one of the note writer's descendants.

The Daily Genealogist: Brick Walls in Your Family Research

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you thought you were enumerated in the 1950 U.S. Federal census. 4,823 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • 68%, Yes
  • 32%, No

This week’s survey asks about the brick walls in your family history research. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Flavel

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

FLAVEL (m): John Flavel (ca. 1630–1691), an English Presbyterian writer, was author of several devotional works, such as Husbandry Spiritualized (1669) (New Century Encyclopaedia of Names [1954], p. 1573). Flavel Bliss, the son of Ellis and Thamar Bliss, was born July 8, 1765, in Hebron, Connecticut (Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 [The Barbour Collection], on AmericanAncestors.org.) Tuillia Aldrich and Flavel Patterson were married on February 4, 1808 in Providence, Rhode Island (Rhode Island Vital Records, 1636-1850, on AmericanAncestors.org).

The 1790 census shows four men with the name: Flavel Clark of Lebanon, Connecticut; Flavel Manley of Sandisfield, Massachusetts; Flavel Moseley of Hampton, Connecticut; and Flavel Roan of Northumberland, Pennsylvania. In 1850, there were 178 men with the name, mostly in the Northeast or Old Northwest, and, in 1940, 233 men from all parts of the United States were enumerated with the name.


The Daily Genealogist: Larchmont Historical Society

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Larchmont Historical Society, New York

Larchmont is one of two villages located within the town of Mamaroneck, in Westchester County, New York. The Larchmont Historical Society has made some local resources available on its website.

Larchmont and Mamaroneck Cemeteries
The Larchmont and Mamaroneck Cemeteries section is a collection of photographs of the gravestones in six cemeteries. Click on the link in the contents list to access the database. You can browse the photographs by cemetery by clicking on the cemetery name and address link or you can search the database by family name or keyword. You can select one or more cemeteries to search by clicking on the cemetery name. If you do not select a cemetery, the photographs returned in the search results will be drawn from all of the photo databases in the society’s photo collections.

Historic Photo Collections
To access this collection click on the Historical Photograph Collection link in the contents list. There are more than a dozen photo collections, including a number of fire company history collections, a collection related to local politics, street images from Mamaroneck and Larchmont, and the Larchmont Times collection. The Larchmont Times collection covers the period from April 20, 1901 through March 1902. There is also a separate database of newspaper advertisements for that period. Click on the site link to access a page with direct links to the databases. Next, click on the specific database link to open a new page with thumbnail images of each newspaper. Click on the thumbnail to select it and click a second time to enlarge it.

New York Soldiers of the Great War
This database was created from a 1920 publication, Soldiers of the Great War, which was an official attempt to identify, with photographs, all the members of the U.S. armed forces who died during World War I. The Larchmont Historical Society has posted on its website all of the pages related to New York soldiers. The database can be searched by the soldier’s surname or residence. The search results will be displayed as scans of the relevant pages from the book. Click on the image of the individual to bring up a full-page image with the following information: name, residence, and cause of death or injury. These pages may be downloaded. Click on the Download a page link for instructions.

Slavery in Mamaroneck Township
This interesting webpage contains resources related to documenting the historical record of slavery in Mamaroneck. There are lists of slaves and slaveholders from a variety of sources, some digitized documents, and links to off-site resources.


The Daily Genealogist: The 1950 Federal Census

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

It may be hard to believe but preparations are now underway to prepare the 1950 census for public viewing. When the 1940 census was released, tools on Stephen Morse’s One-Step website helped researchers locate addresses when a name index did not yet exist or was faulty. On the day the 1940 census was released — April 2, 2012 — the One-Step site received over 2.25 million hits. The One-Step tables “developed for these utilities were also used by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) on their 1940 website, Ancestry.com on their initial 1940 offering, and the NY Public Library’s digitized 1940 phone book website.”

An announcement from Steve Morse and Joel Weintraub introduces the One-Step site’s Project 1950:

“If you wondered how we produced free locational tools for the opening of the1940 census on the Morse One-Step site, wonder no more and be part of the team to do the same thing for 1950. We have opened up ‘Project 1950’ to prepare searchable ED definitions and street indexes for the opening of the 1950 Census in 2022. With the help of about 125 volunteers we produced our 1940 tools, and now are looking for about 200+ volunteers to help with Phase I (transcription of Enumeration District definitions) and Phase II (creating urban area street indexes) for 1950. An explanation of the two phases and what needs to be done can be found at stevemorse.org/census/project1950intro.html. It may seem too early to be doing this, but it took us over seven years to produce the 1940 tools that were used by…millions of researchers.”

There will be differences between the 1950 census and the 1940 one. The 1950 census contains less information than the 1940, and it was the first census to enumerate Americans abroad. It was also the first to be partially tabulated by computer, the UNIVAC I. To learn more about the 1950 census, visit the National Archives 1950 overview.

While the One-Step website (stevemorse.org) offers many helpful census tools, it also provides useful assistance for accessing a variety of other records. Look for information on Ellis Island and passenger arrivals; Castle Garden years (1855–1891) plus other New York arrivals; other ports of immigration; Canadian and British census; New York census; births, deaths, and other vital records; calendar, sunrise/sunset, and maps; dealing with characters in foreign alphabets; Holocaust and Eastern Europe; and genetic genealogy (DNA).


The Daily Genealogist: Abigail Adams’s Birthplace Ready to Reopen

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

All Spruced Up, Abigail Adams’s Birthplace Ready to Reopen
“It’s been cut in half and moved twice — once pulled by oxen — threatened with demolition, and chewed by termites. But on June 30, a newly renovated Abigail Adams birthplace will reopen to the public, whole and in better shape than it’s been in years.” More about the birthplace, in North Weymouth, Massachusetts, is available here.

The Daily Genealogist: Hunt is On for a Distant Cousin of Prince William

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Hunt is on in Gujarat for a Distant Cousin who Shares Prince William’s Indian Blood
Recent genetic testing “revealed that Eliza Kewark, Prince William’s great, great, great, great, great grandmother, was of Indian origin.”

The Daily Genealogist: DNA Unlocks Mystery of Birth Father’s Identity

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

DNA Helps Man Unlock Mystery of his Birth Father’s Identity
“Richard Hill’s search for the identity of his birth father reads like a good mystery, filled with false leads, dead-ends and a high-tech finish.”

The Daily Genealogist: Are You in the 1950 Census?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many generations of your patrilineal line (your father’s father’s father, etc.) you have succesfully traced. 4,605 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • <1%, One (you)
  • <1%, Two (your and your father)
  • 3%, Three (you, your father, and grandfather)
  • 11%, Four
  • 17%, Five
  • 13%, Six
  • 9%, Seven
  • 7%, Eight
  • 6%, Nine
  • 7%, Ten
  • 6%, Eleven
  • 6%, Twelve
  • 3%, Thirteen
  • 2%, Fourteen
  • 8%, Fifteen or more
  • <1%, I don’t know.

This week’s survey asks whether you were enumerated in the 1950 census. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Armida

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ARMIDA (f): One of the main female characters in the epic Jerusalem Delivered by Torquato Tasso (Italian Renaissance); the story also inspired several operas, such as those by Jean-Baptiste Lully (1686), J.-W. Glück (1777) and G.A. Rossini (1817):

She was a beautiful sorceress, with whom Rinaldo [one of Charlemagne's paladins, based on his nephew, the hero Roland] fell in love, and wasted his time in voluptuous pleasure. Two messengers were sent from the Christian army with a talisman to disenchant him. After his escape, Armida followed him in distraction, but not being able to allure him back, set fire to her palace, rushed into the midst of a combat, and was slain. (Brewer, p. 64).

Armida Potter (1765–1798, daughter of Dr. James and Abigail [Barns] Potter) m. New Fairfield North (Sherman, Conn.) Congregational Church 23 Nov. 1797 Bennett Pickett (1764–1854), and apparently died bearing an only child, Armida Pickett (1798–1826) who herself died unmarried. Why Dr. and Mrs. Potter (several of whose offspring bear imaginative names) named one for an apparently love-crazed sorceress, we cannot now determine; certainly such a choice reflects eighteenth-century America's discovery of non-Puritan literature and ideals. Perhaps Dr. Potter shared his reading material with the neighbors, as the name is more common than usual in the Sherman/New Milford area. For example, Armida Giddings (1773–1827, daughter of Jonathan and Mary [Baldwin] Giddings), later wife of David Gaylord, was one of several siblings bp. New Fairfield North 26 May 1776; other local Armidas were her niece, Armida Giddings (1815–1818, daughter of Samuel Giddings by his first marriage to a cousin, Lydia Giddings) and Mrs. Gaylord's sister-in-law Armida (Sanford) Giddings (1796–post 1881, daughter of Ebenezer and Jerusha [Buck] Sanford), second wife of Samuel Giddings above.


The Daily Genealogist: Cemetery Databases — California and Georgia

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Mission City Memorial Park, Santa Clara, California

Santa Clara is located in Santa Clara County — which is home to Silicon Valley — in northern California. The city of Santa Clara owns and operates Mission City Memorial Park cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in the state. The first recorded burial occurred on September 13, 1864, and there were just over 1,400 burials prior to 1900. The cemetery has been known by many different names over the years: Santa Clara Burial Ground, Santa Clara Protestant Cemetery, and Santa Clara City Cemetery. It was renamed Mission City Memorial Park in 1972.

You can take a self-guided walking tour through Mission City Memorial Park by clicking on the “view the walking tour brochure online” link. The brochure contains information about the cemetery's history and many of the notable people buried there.

Browse the burial index, available on the Santa Clara County Historical & Genealogical Society website, here. The database is organized alphabetically by surname. The data fields in the index are last name; first name; middle name; birth date; death date; age (years, month, days); sex; place of death; location (cemetery section); and burial location (coordinate, tier, row, number). There is a map of the cemetery on both the city website and the Santa Clara County Historical & Genealogical Society website.

Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Georgia

The city of Macon is located in central Georgia. It is the county seat of Bibb County. Riverside Cemetery was established in 1887. More than 18,000 people have been buried there, including many Confederate and Union Civil War veterans. Click on the History link in the contents banner to learn more about the cemetery's history. To view a sectional map of the cemetery, click on the Map link in the contents banner.

Click on the Genealogy link to open the burial database search page. Records have been kept since the cemetery's establishment in 1887. The name field contains a hyperlink to a detailed record for the individual are name; date of birth; date of death; interment date; spouse or parent; and surviving relatives. In addition, a section titled Lot Information includes lot designation, names of others buried in the lot, and a map. Many obituaries are provided; click on the View Obituary link. Photographs of gravestones are also accessible.


The Daily Genealogist: Filiopietism Prism

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Our latest blog profile features Filiopietism Prism, written by John D. Tew, who wrote an article for the fall 2011 issue of American Ancestors magazine, “Echoes from the Dorr Rebellion: The 1842 Aplin/Carpenter Correspondence.” (NEHGS members can read the article online.) Here, John introduces his blog:

Filiopietism Prism went live on New Year's Eve 2012. It was inspired byNutfield Genealogy, and a generous invitation from its author, Heather Wilkinson Rojo, to contribute a guest post in February 2012.

I have been interested in my family history since I was a teenager. My initial interest came from discovering that the “Rhode Island Pirate,” Thomas Tew, hailed from Newport, where my ancestors resided. Although various sources have linked him to my ancestors, no proof has been found and I continue to pursue all new leads. After this original encounter with genealogy, I began to slowly and sporadically collect family information and photographs in file folders and boxes. Following the birth of our two sons, my interest deepened and got more organized. This, coupled with a general interest in history, prompted me to begin writing a family history and eventually led to the decision to start a blog.

Filiopietism Prism is largely focused on my New England ancestry because both my paternal and maternal lineage go back to the early colonization of New England - the Mayflower on my mother's side and the 1640 arrival of the Tews to Newport, Rhode Island on my father's side. The blog allows me to share information, photographs, and resources I have accumulated and reach out to others who have similar interests. It has also led to the discovery of a few distant cousins.

I like to explore lost traditions I have discovered through my genealogy pursuits (such as May baskets). I also have developed two regular features: Saturday Serendipity (which passes on interesting genealogy and history reads) and Samaritan Sunday (which presents stories of strangers helping strangers with genealogy-related assistance).


The Daily Genealogist: In Praise of an Irish Genealogy Blog

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

In Praise of an Irish Genealogy Blog
Irish Times genealogy columnist John Grenham recommends Claire Santry's Irish Genealogy News.

The Daily Genealogist: Hatbox Letters Mystery

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Hatbox Letters Mystery: Forgotten Notes Forge Bonds
“What began as a trivial consignment purchase 15 years ago ended with a pair of siblings obtaining a priceless link to their past.”

The Daily Genealogist: The Perfect Gift for T. Boone Pickens

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

The Perfect Birthday Gift for T. Boone Pickens: History
“What do you give a legendary Texas billionaire on his 85th birthday? Well, a complete stranger mailed T. Boone Pickens a trunk of Civil War-era letters written by his ancestors.”

The Daily Genealogist: Mt. Washington Hoping to Solve Photo Mystery

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Mt. Washington Hoping to Solve Pre-1900 Photo Mystery
The Mt. Washington Auto Road is seeking to identify the stage drivers in an historic photograph.

The Daily Genealogist: Patrilineal Generations

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey if you've donated family papers or memorabilia to a museum, historical society or genealogical society. 3,565 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • 35%, Yes, I have donated material.
  • 28%, Not yet — but I intend to.
  • 37%, No, I have not donated material.

This week’s survey asks how many generations of your patrilineal line (your father’s father’s father, etc.) you have successfully traced. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Aquila

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

AQUILA (m) (Latin 'eagle'). In Christian iconography the eagle is the symbol of the Gospel of St. John. A man named Aquila was associated with St. Paul; a later Aquila (fl. early half 2nd century A.D.) translated the Hebrew Bible into a very literal Greek. Both men are said to have been natives of Pontus [in Asia Minor], the latter prob. a native of Sinope in that region (Henry Wace and William C. Piercy, A Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature to the End of the Sixth Century A.D., with an Account of the Principal Sects and Heresies [London: John Murray, 1911, repr. Peabody, Mass.: Henderson Publishers, 1994], pp. 38–39).

Aquila Chase (1618–1670) was an early settler of Hampton, N.H. (1640) and Newbury, Massachusetts (1646). John Carroll Chase and George Walter Chamberlain, Seven Generations of the Descendants of Aquila and Thomas Chase (Derry, N.H., 1928, rev. ed. Camden, Maine: Picton Press, 1983, 1993), note that the exact parentage of the immigrant Aquila Chase and his brother Thomas seem to be still unknown; although several earlier English Aquila Chases have been identified in Chesham, Bucks, and in London, no positive matches have been found for the immigrant. The other seventeenth-century immigrant to New England bearing this rare given name was Aquila Purchase of Kingweston, Somerset, and Dorchester, Mass., brother-in-law of Bernard Capen of Dorchester in Old and New England. Both Chase and Purchase were likely named for Aquila, husband of Priscilla, mentioned by St. Paul.

The 1790 census lists 21 men named Aquila, with occurrences from Vermont to South Carolina, with the largest number in Maryland. In 1850, there were 111 men with the name, and, in 1940, there were 77.


The Daily Genealogist: Illinois Cemetery and Obituary Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Greenmount Cemetery, Quincy Illinois

The city of Quincy is located along the Mississippi River on the western border of Illinois. It is the county seat of Adams County.

In 1875 the German Evangelical Salem Church established Green Mound Cemetery in Quincy as a private cemetery for members of Salem Church and other area Lutheran churches. A new section of the cemetery was opened in 1897, and was named New Greenmount Cemetery. Soon after, the cemetery was opened to the general public. In about 1909, the name Greenmount Cemetery began to be used exclusively.

More than 30,000 individuals are estimated to have been buried in Greenmount Cemetery. The cemetery office has kept interment records since April 1906, although there are some earlier records. Cemetery lot purchase records have been maintained since 1875 and may be found in the cemetery office. Click on the History link to learn more.

To search the burial database, click on the Search/Info link. Enter a last and/or first name in the search boxes. The data fields in the database are first name; middle name; last name; AKA (also known as); maiden name; date of birth; date of death and date of interment; age; stone information; and link to a page containing burial location information. Burial location information includes block, lot, section, and grave numbers. Click on the Plot Map link on the homepage to view the cemetery map.

Dodge Grove Cemetery, Mattoon, Illinois

The city of Mattoon is in Coles County, located in the central part of Illinois. The Mattoon City Council purchased land for a city cemetery in 1862 and the cemetery, named Dodge Grove, was opened in spring 1863. It is estimated that more than 20,000 burials have taken place in Dodge Grove Cemetery, including three Civil War generals and approximately 260 Civil War soldiers.

Scroll to the bottom of the webpage to find a cemetery map and an alphabetical database of burial records, which has been updated to February 20, 2013. These files are in PDF format. The data fields in the index are last name; first name; age; death date; section; division; grave space; lot owner; and funeral home.


The Daily Genealogist: Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Website

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Website
by Lynn Betlock, Editor

Readers with Vermont ancestors — or those interested in the history and culture of the state — should explore the resources available at the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial website. It offers a ten-page PDF, Vermont & the Civil War: A Visitor's Guide, which “describes 46 places to visit. The guide will take you to New England's best documented stop on the Underground Railroad, the factory where the gun milling machines that armed the nation were produced, and the resort where Mary Lincoln and her children summered in 1864.” The site also includes links to information about various aspects of Vermont's Civil War history as well as a link to the Vermont Historical Society's page on Researching the Civil War from a Vermont Perspective.

Those interested in pursuing the topic further will want to investigate a new book by Howard Coffin, Something Abides: Discovering the Civil War in Today's Vermont. “Coffin takes the reader through every town in the Green Mountain State to document more than 3,000 sites that were in some way touched by the Civil War and are extant today. Not a theme-park guide to quaintly preserved structures, the sites identified here are homes where soldiers lived and died, hospitals where they were treated, and halls where abolitionists spoke passionately.” Howard Coffin is also the author of Full Duty: Vermonters in the Civil War.


The Daily Genealogist: 100 Years after Death, 2 Civil War Veterans Laid to Rest

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

100 Years after Death, 2 Civil War Veterans Are Finally Laid to Rest
Two brothers, Civil War veterans, were recently given a military burial and interred at Arlington Nation Cemetery, due to the efforts of volunteers with the Missing in America Project, which aims to locate and bury the unclaimed remains of veterans.

The Daily Genealogist: Most European Males Descended from Farmers

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Most European Males Descended from Farmers
Dr Patricia Balaresque, first author of a study which looked at the most common genetic lineage in European males, said that “…more than 80% of European Y chromosomes descend from incoming farmers. In contrast, most maternal genetic lineages seem to descend from hunter-gatherers.”

The Daily Genealogist: RTE Sells Genealogy Roadshow Format to PBS

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

RTE Sells Genealogy Roadshow Format Rights to PBS for US Remake
RTE, Ireland's national television and radio broadcaster, has licensed its popular “Genealogy Roadshow” program to PBS. “A new version of the programme, in which a team of travelling experts attempt to piece together ordinary people's family histories, will now premiere in the US in September.”

The Daily Genealogist: Photos Uncovers Travels of Frontenac Couple

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Photos Uncover Travels of Frontenac [Missouri] Couple, Thanks to Facebook
Jeff Phillips purchased thirty boxes of old slides in an antique shop and then turned to Facebook to identify the couple in the images.

The Daily Genealogist: Have You Donated Memorabilia?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked about your summer genealogical travel plans. 3,747 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • 61%, Yes, I plan to visit a library, archive, historical society, or cemetery to do research.
  • 41%, Yes, I plan to visit at least one ancestral town or city.
  • 28%, Yes, I plan to visit relatives who share my interest in genealogy.
  • 12%, Yes, I plan to attend a genealogical conference.
  • 31%, No, I do not plan to travel for genealogical purposes this summer.

This week’s survey asks if you’ve donated family papers or memorabilia to an institution. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Achilles

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ACHILLES (m): The great Greek warrior hero of Homer's Iliad. The name was used by the French and Scots especially. Captain Achilles Preston, who “was at the capture of Ticonderoga and Montreal and under Gen. Wolfe,” died in Providence, Rhode Island, on July 1, 1814 (Rhode Island Vital Records, 1636-1850, on AmericanAncestors.org). On October 26, 1908, Achilles Frichette married Angelina Bergeron in Lewiston, Maine (Maine Marriages Index, 1892-1966, 1977-1996, on AmericanAncestors.org). There were three men named Achilles in the 1790 census, in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Vermont. In the 1850 census, there were 323 men with the name, and in 1940, 361.

The Daily Genealogist: Aspen Historical Society

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Aspen Historical Society — Archive Aspen, Colrado

The city of Aspen is the county seat of Pitkin County, Colorado. It is located in the central part of the state. The Aspen Historical Society has made a number of resources available on its Archive Aspen website.

Click on the Historic Directories & Records icon to access the document resources.

City Directories & Phone Books
The site includes more than twenty city directories and telephone books from various years between 1885 and 1950. Click on the date link to view the directory images.

Marriage Records
Volume XI of Colorado Genealogical Etcetera indexes Pitkin County marriages from 1882 through 1930. The data in each record includes groom's full name, bride's full name, and date of the marriage. The volume is in chronological order, and there is an index by surname if you do not know the year the couple married.

Census Records
This section contains indexes to various census records for Pitkin County. There are indexes to the 1900 through 1930 U.S. federal census and the 1885 Colorado state census. The data fields for the state census include last name, first name/initials, race, male, female, age, single, married, divorced, and nativity

Cemetery Records
The Aspen Historical Society compiled and published a volume of Colorado Genealogical Etcetera containing tombstone transcriptions for four Pitkin County cemeteries: Aspen Red Butte, Aspen Ute, Aspen Grove, and Basalt There is a surname index to the volume.

Naturalization Records
This section contains an alphabetical index to naturalization records for the period from 1888 to 1908 for Pitkin County. The data fields are name, country of birth or allegiance, and date of naturalization.

Click on the Photo Gallery icon to access more than 10,000 images. You can browse through the complete collection or search the image database by keywords. There is also an advanced search function, which enables you to search by keywords, title, subject, creator, object name/other name, people, place, and more. In addition, you can view samples of “Top Pick” photographs in slideshow format.

Also available is a link to the Colorado Historic Newspaper site, where you can browse and search a dozen Pitkin County newspapers.


New England Historic Genealogical Society
99 - 101 Newbury Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116, USA
888-296-3447

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