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The Daily Genealogist: “Mehetbel Chandler Coit: Finding ‘Her Book’”

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

One Colonial Woman's World: The Life and Writings of Mehetabel Chandler Coit (2012), by Michelle Marchetti Coughlin, “reconstructs the life of Mehetabel Chandler Coit (1673-1758), the author of what may be the earliest surviving diary by an American woman.” Born in Roxbury, Massachusetts, Coit permanently settled in New London, Connecticut, when she was fourteen.

Coughlin, who spoke at NEHGS in February, described her search for Mehetabel's diary in an article, “Mehetabel Chandler Coit: Finding ‘Her Book’” in the spring 2013 issue of the online journal Common-Place. To track down the diary, which had been cited in an 1895 book, Coughlin was relentless in her pursuit of every lead, and persisted long after most would have given up the search. Genealogists will appreciate Coughlin's tenacity and her ultimate success. More information about Mehetabel Chander Coit - and Coughlin's upcoming appearances in Massachusetts - is available at onecolonialwomansworld.com.


The Daily Genealogist: “Orphaned” by World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

“Orphaned” by World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers“Those who lost a father in World War II are considered ‘war orphans.’ These are the stories of three of those children who have lived nearly all their lives without their dads.”

The Daily Genealogist: Race Against Time to Find WWI’s Last “Doughboys”

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

A Race Against Time to Find WWI’s Last “Doughboys”
“Ten years ago, writer Richard Rubin set out to talk to every living American veteran of World War I he could find. It wasn’t easy, but he tracked down dozens of centenarian vets, ages 101 to 113, collected their stories and put them in a new book called The Last of the Doughboys.”

The Daily Genealogist: Pathogen Genome Tracks Irish Potato Famine to Its Roots

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Pathogen Genome Tracks Irish Potato Famine Back to Its Roots
“Working from 150-year-old dried leaves, two competing teams have now sequenced the genome of the single-celled organism that wreaked havoc on the Irish potato crop.”

The Daily Genealogist: Who Do You Think You Are? Heads to TLC

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

“Who Do You Think You Are?” Heads to TLC
A new season of episodes has been ordered for the popular genealogy television show. [Filming has been completed at NEHGS for an upcoming episode.]

The Daily Genealogist: What Are Your Summer Genealogical Plans?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you were named for a family member. 4,353 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • 47%, Yes, I was named for an ancestor.
  • 12%, Yes, I was named for a relative who was not an ancestor.
  • 2%, I am not sure if I was named for a family member.
  • 39%, No, I was not named for a family member.

This week’s survey asks your summer genealogical travel plans. Take the survey now!


Name Origins: Amelia

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

AMELIA (f): Derived from the Germanic root amal-, which is of uncertain meaning, this name became popular at about the same time as the similar-sounding EMILY, which is derived probably via French EMILIE, from Latin AEMILIA, feminine of a Roman family name. (The French equivalent of AMELIA is AMÉLIE.) Amelias abounded in many German royal families, including that of Hanover, a reason for much of the name's popularity in English-speaking countries. The name may well have gained further currency due to the character of Amelia in Henry Fielding's novel (1751) of that name; the virtuous heroine is said to have been modeled on the author's wife, Charlotte Cradock.

Amelia Potter, daughter of Stephen Potter, of Coventry, Rhode Island, married Chandler Holmes of Woodstock, Connecticut, in Woodstock on January 4, 1787 (Woodstock, Ct., Vital Records, 1686-1854 on AmericanAncestors.org). On May 21, 1856, Pascal B. Simons of Manchester, N.H., married Amelia Henry of Goffstown, N.H., in Goffstown. (Goffstown, N.H., Town Records, on AmericanAncestors.org).


The Daily Genealogist: Midwestern Historical and Genealogical Society Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Iron County Historical Society, Missouri

Iron County is located in southeast Missouri. Ironton is the largest city and county seat. The primary resources on the historical society's website are the 1946 Ironton-Arcadia Telephone Directory, which has been digitized and uploaded, and a transcription of the tax list from the January 20 and 27, 1898 issues of the Iron County Register newspaper. The data fields in the tax list are surname, given name, and total assessed dollar value. In addition you will find school enumeration records for 1870–1906, a list of schools, teachers, and clerks for 1911–1912, and old photographs. These resources may be found under the Reference Material contents list on the left side of the homepage.

Washington County Genealogical Society, Nebraska

Washington County is located in the eastern part of the state on the Nebraska-Iowa border. Blair is its county seat. The Washington County Genealogical Society has made two databases available on its website.

Obituaries
The 6,670 transcribed obituaries on the site are from the Washington County Genealogical Society archive in the Blair Public Library. The obituaries are arranged alphabetically. Click on the name link to view the transcription. The data fields in the index are date of death, name of the deceased, and available online. There may be multiple records from different sources for a single death.

Marriages
This database is an index to marriages from the deed books at the Washington County Courthouse from 1856 through the end of 2009. There are more than 16,400 records. The database is sorted alphabetically by groom's surname. The data fields are date of marriage, groom's full name, bride's full name, deed book number, and page number.

Cedar Falls Historical Society, Iowa

The city of Cedar Falls is located in Black Hawk County, Iowa. The Cedar Falls Historical Society has made a few resources available on its website. Click on the Archives and Library link under the Research tab to access them. These include transcriptions of the 1850 federal census and the 1852 state census for Cedar Falls Township. The data fields in the 1850 census include dwelling, surname, first name, age, sex, and place of birth. The data fields in the transcription of the state census are heads of family, number of males, number of females, number of voters, number of militia, and the total compared to the 1850 census. Other resources include a transcription of the 1874 Cedar Falls city directory and a Civil War roster for Company “B” of the 31st Infantry Regiment. The data fields for the roster database are last name, first name, photo (yes/no), and notes, which contains biographical information about the soldier.


The Daily Genealogist: Readers Respond on Yugoslavian Research

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week's Ask a Genealogist column on researching Yugoslavian ancestors by Libby Feil prompted a number of responses from Weekly Genealogist readers. Here is a sample:

Kathleen Poznick of Weatherford, Texas: The recent article about immigrant relations from Yugoslavia brought to mind my trouble in locating my husband's father and grandparents in the census. They also were from Yugoslavia and, after meeting in upstate New York, moved to Michigan. Try as I might I could not locate my father-in-law in the 1920 census in Detroit, even though I knew he was born there just three years before. Luckily my husband actually remembered their address (they lived there for 40+ years) so I searched that way. We found them! First names and ages matched but the last name was completely off. We were searching "POZNICK" and I had tried various ways of spelling but it was under "POHEZK," not even close to what we had been searching. Area researchers might want to note that a large community of Yugoslavians who settled in Cleveland, Ohio, had their own newspaper. The person searching could also try the Yugoslavia message board on Rootsweb or one of the Rootsweb groups focusing on the successor states created after the breakup of Yugoslavia: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Slovenia, Serbia and Montenegro.

Elizabeth Dutton of Boalsburg, Pennsylvania: Here are my suggestions for the Eastern European research problem: Try to locate and contact the ethnic church(es) and cemeteries that served the area; search line by line through the 1920 census (if it's Detroit, maybe try the relevant and nearby wards); and, if a visit to the location is not possible, work through microfilmed indexes to vital records, probate, property, etc.

Greg Crane of Athens, Georgia: Perhaps the person who asked the question might be desperate enough to do what I was forced to do to find one of my wife's great-grandparents. It's very time consuming, but the success is so satisfying. I did a systematic search by first (given) name. With a name like George, and all the possible variants, it might be too difficult but it is worth considering.


The Daily Genealogist: How Ken Burns Explores New England

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

How Ken Burns Explores New England
Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns discusses some of his favorite historic sites and natural spaces in New England.

The Daily Genealogist: The Long Lost Germans of Texas

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Remembering the Long Lost Germans of Texas
An interview with University of Texas professor Hans Boas, director of the Texas German Dialect Project, discusses an almost-extinct variant of German, Texas German.

The Daily Genealogist: America’s Birthplace Could Disappear

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

With Rising Seas, America’s Birthplace Could Disappear
Jamestown, Virginia, the first successful English colony in America, “is now threatened by rising sea levels that scientists say could submerge the island by century’s end.”

The Daily Genealogist: Were You Named After a Ancestor?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked when your first immigrant ancestor arrived in North America. 5,475 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • <1%, 2000 to the present
  • 1%, 1900 to 1999
  • 9%, 1800 to 1899
  • 6%, 1700 to 1799
  • 78%, 1600 to 1699
  • 3%, 1500 to 1599
  • 1%, Prior to 1500
  • 2%, I am not sure when my earliest immigrant ancestor arrived in North America.

This week’s survey asks if you were named after a relative. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Clementina

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

CLEMENTINA (f): Derived from the Latin clemens ("mild, merciful") with addition of productive suffix -ina to the adjective root, this name has long been used in England. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the female name had strong Jacobite connotations; one of the fabled romantic stories of that era was the journey in 1717/18, across much of Europe, of [Maria Casimire] Clementina Sobieska (d. 1735), Princess of Poland, to meet and marry James Francis Edward Stuart (1688–1736, the Jacobite "James III"). Her namesake, Clementina Maria Sophia Walkinshaw (ca. 1720–1802), mistress of their son "Bonnie Prince Charlie" (Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720–1788, the Jacobite "Charles III"), bore him several children. After the mid-1750s, however, and the appearance of Samuel Richardson’s Sir Charles Grandison (1753/4) — one of whose two heroines is the noble Italian Clementina della Porretta — the name was favored by readers across the political spectrum. Clementine was a variant form which gained great currency in the mid-nineteenth century with the popular song "Oh, My Darling Clementine," which requires no previous knowledge of Richardson.

Clementina Janes (b. 1802), daughter of Peleg Cheney and Patty (Coy) Janes of Brimfield, Mass., m. there 1 Jan. 1828 Edward Parsons of Northampton, Mass. (Brimfield VRs, p. 207). Clementina (Ballou) Wright (1812-post 1888, daughter of Rev. Hosea and Ruth [Washburn] Ballou) had no issue by her marriage to Col. Isaac Hall Wright, but namesakes included nieces (both b. 1834) Clementina (Ballou) Mason (daughter of Rev. Hosea Faxon and Mary [Ballou] Ballou) and Clementina Clarissa (Ballou) Tucker (daughter of Rev. Massena Berthier and Mary Sheffield [Jacobs] Ballou, who named their daughter for two Richardson heroines), herself mother of Clemmie Richmond Tucker (b. 1863).


The Daily Genealogist: Nokomis, Saskatchewan

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Town of Nokomis, Saskatchewan, Canada

The town of Nokomis is located in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The town is about 400 miles west of Winnipeg, Manitoba, and 85 miles north of the city of Regina. Click on the History tab to view the resources on the town’s website. Resources include Nokomis and Lockwood town histories, cemetery, census, and obituary databases, as well as approximately 40 old photographs.

Town Histories
The History of Nokomis, The Junction Town, 1905–1955 can be accessed by clicking on the Junction Town link. The Story of Lockwood Community can be found by clicking on the Lockwood History link. (Lockwood is located about ten miles north of Nokomis.)

Cemetery Databases
There are two databases, one for Nokomis and the other for Lockwood. Clicking on the cemetery links will open new pages containing alphabetical databases. The databases contain the following information: full name, date of birth, date of death, and, in some cases, the names of the deceased’s parents and other information. The Nokomis Cemetery database includes plot information (page number in the town records, block number and lot number) and some surnames are linked to obituaries. The Lockwood Cemetery database contains links to photographs of gravestones.

1906 and 1911 Censuses
The data fields for the local 1906 census are household, name, relationship, age, marital status, origin, immigration year, and location. The data fields for the 1911 local census are household, name, sex, relation, marital status, birth date, age, birthplace, immigration, occupation, and location.

Homesteads
This section contains the “names, dates and locations of the original ‘Dominion Land Grants’ as issued by the Dominion Lands Branch of the Federal Department of the Interior from 1871 to 1930 and then by the Lands Branch of the Government of Saskatchewan since 1930.” The data fields are name, land location (part, section, township, range, meridian), and date.

Obituaries
Click on the Obituaries links to access 434 obituary transcriptions for residents and former residents of Nokomis and Lockwood. Click on a surname link in the alphabetical list to view an obituary.


The Daily Genealogist: NEHGS Publications Honored

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

On Tuesday, May 7, three NEHGS publications were honored with New England Book Show Awards: Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research, 5th Edition;Western Massachusetts Families in 1790; and the NEHGS Book & Gift Catalog 2012/2013. The New England Book Show is an annual juried show that recognizes the year’s most outstanding work by New England publishers, printers, and graphic designers. Winning books are selected for their design, quality of materials, and workmanship.

Last week, at the 2013 NGS Family History Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, Helen Schatvet Ullmann received the National Genealogical Society’s Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History for her book, Some Descendants of Roger Billings of Dorchester, Massachusetts (Newbury Street Press, an imprint of NEHGS, 2012). This award recognizes a significant contribution to genealogy that serves to foster scholarship and advance excellence in family history.


The Daily Genealogist: Charlemagne's DNA and Our Universal Royalty

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Charlemagne’s DNA and Our Universal Royalty
In a recent National Geographic blog, Carl Zimmer discusses the findings of statisticians and geneticists who've looked at the “web-like tapestry” that is genealogy.

The Daily Genealogist: Alice E. Kober — Lost to History No More

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Alice E. Kober, 43 — Lost to History No More
Margalit Fox, a senior obituary writer at the New York Times, brings the story of Alice Kober, who worked tirelessly to crack an ancient Aegean code, Linear B, out of obscurity.


The Daily Genealogist: Maps Reveal Owners of Lands Taken by Cromwell

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Maps Reveal Owners of Lands Taken by Cromwell
“A staggering collection of maps assembled in Trinity College Dublin…reveal the exact ownership of the lands that were plundered from Irish families and given to landlords during the Cromwellian Plantation” of 1652–58.

The Daily Genealogist: When Did Your First Immigrant Ancestor Arrive?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many generations of your maternal line you have researched. 4,010 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • <1%, One (you)
  • <1%, Two (you and your mother)
  • 3%, Three (you, your mother, and grandmother)
  • 13%, Four
  • 18%, Five
  • 15%, Six
  • 9%, Seven
  • 6%, Eight
  • 4%, Nine
  • 5%, Ten
  • 3%, Eleven
  • 4%, Twelve
  • 18%, Thirteen or more
  • <1%, I don’t know

This week’s survey asks when your first immigrant ancestor arrived in North America. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Lavinia

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

LAVINIA (f): Female form of a Roman family name. In Roman legend, Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, king of Latium [the area around Rome: modern Lazio]. She married the Trojan newcomer Aeneas, hero of Vergil’s Aeneid. Her name springs from the same root as the ancient city of Lavinium, about seventeen miles south of Rome. In Titus Andronicus, Shakespeare’s bloodiest play, the eponymous hero has a daughter by this name (Clarence L. Barnhart, William D. Halsey et al., The New Century Cyclopedia of Names, 3 vols. [New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1954], 2:2399).

Familiar forms often seen in New England are VINEY or VINNY. Lavinia Dickinson (1833–1899) of Amherst, Mass., sister of the poet Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (1830–1886), arranged for publication of Emily’s poems after the poet’s death. In the 1850 census, 5,195 women named Lavinia were enumerated. The 1940 census listed 4,436 women with that name.


The Daily Genealogist: Newspaper Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Brewster Public Library, New York

rewster is a village in the town of Southeast, which is located in the southeastern part of Putnam County, New York. The Brewster Public Library has made a newspaper database available on its website. Click on the Databases tab and select Brewster Standard from the drop down list to access it.

The Brewster Standard was a weekly newspaper that covered the news of Brewster, Southeast, Tilly Foster, Sodom, Patterson, Carmel, Mahopac, Somers, North Salem, and Croton Falls, New York, and Danbury, Connecticut. The database covers the period from 1870 through 1982.Click on the “on line edition” link to open the search page. Enter keywords in the search box, and, to search for a phrase, place quotes around the words. Instructions are given for advanced searches. I offer an additional search tip: to search a particular year, be sure to include the year in your keywords. Click on the title link in the search results to display the corresponding newspaper page as a PDF. You can search within the document for key words or phrases by clicking the icon at the top left of the viewable page — the icon may be a magnifying glass or binoculars, depending on your version of Adobe Reader.

Sadie Pope Dowdell Library, New Jersey

The Sadie Pope Dowdell Library is located in South Amboy, which is on Raritan Bay in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The library has made a digital version of the South Amboy Citizen newspaper, from 1910 to 2000, available on its website. The database is split into two parts. The first covers 1910 through 1943. To begin a search in this time period, select a year from the drop down list. Then select the month and date to access a PDF file containing the issue. Click on The South Amboy Citizen (1944–2000) link to access files for this later period. Click on a year to access a PDF file of an individual issue.The issues may be searched by clicking on the binoculars icon on the left side of the page or by using the Find function under the Edit menu. Please note that the library’s website states that you will need the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the files properly.


The Daily Genealogist: Annie Haven Thwing’s Boston

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

If genealogists researching Boston ancestors aren’t familiar with the work of Annie Haven Thwing (1851-1940), they should be. Born in Roxbury (now part of Boston), Thwing “devoted over thirty years of her life to painstaking historical research on early Boston. According to Thwing, her interest was sparked by a desire ‘to find out where my ancestors lived, who were their neighbors, and what the neighborhood was like.’ Only Thwing did not stop with her own ancestors; she set out to answer these questions for all of Boston. Focusing on analysis and synthesis of primary sources, Annie Haven Thwing created several indispensable and accessible resources for historians.”[1]

“When Annie presented her research collection to the Massachusetts Historical Society in December 1916, it consisted of twenty-two typewritten volumes of Boston deed extracts entitled ‘Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630–1800,’ a two-volume ‘History of the Streets of Boston, 1630–1800,’ and the Thwing Card Index. This last comprised approximately 125,000 index cards, with all the ‘items of interest of each inhabitant’ she had compiled arranged alphabetically by name. That index, still much used by researchers and now the foundation of an electronic database, fills seventy-four library drawers at the Massachusetts Historical Society.”[2]

In 1920, Thwing drew on her research to publish the book for which she is best known today, The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston, 1630–1822. In 2001, the Massachusetts Historical Society and the New England Historic Genealogical Society collaborated on a CD, Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630–1800 and The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston, 1630–1822, that includes the Thwing Index and contains more than 62,000 records. (The CD is available for purchase here.)

While many genealogists are familiar with Annie Haven Thwing’s scholarship, they might not be aware that she also created a model of Boston that can still be viewed today. “In 1900, the Massachusetts Infant Asylum, a charitable organization for which Annie served as one of the directors, planned a fundraising fair. Typically, Annie decided upon an ambitious project for exhibition: an accurate scale model of the town of Boston, ca. 1775, based largely on the information she had amassed…Annie was no modeler, however, and time was short, so the model had to be reduced to a…modest five and a half feet by four and a half feet. The outline and topographical features were drawn from a map Annie had commissioned for the book she planned to write. For the model buildings, Annie turned to a carpenter named Munsey living on Orr’s Island, Maine, where she passed her summers…Munsey worked from pictures supplied by Annie Thwing…[and her] model featured the eighteenth-century street pattern she had so carefully reconstructed and nearly 120 handcarved building replicas. In addition to the acclaim it received for its appearance at the fair for the Infant Asylum, the Thwing model also received appreciation in a city exposition in 1909. In December of that year, Annie gave the model to the Old South Association, where it resides as a popular exhibit to this day.”[3]

Built in 1729 as a Puritan meeting house, the Old South Meeting House is best known as the site of lively public meetings in the years leading to the American Revolution, including the meeting that led to the Boston Tea Party. At the time, Old South was the largest building in Boston. Today, Old South is a museum, a Freedom Trail site, and an active gathering place. (Old South is also a center for history education, as I witnessed last week when my children and their third grade classmates took on the roles of Loyalists and Patriots and debated the tax on tea.)

Annie Haven Thwing left a rich and invaluable legacy for Boston genealogists, historians, and institutions — and it all began with a simple desire “to find out where my ancestors lived.” For a detailed look at Thwing’s life, I highly recommend Len Travers’s article, cited below.


1Lynn Betlock, “Annie Haven Thwing: Guardian of the Crooked and Narrow Street.” The Dial of the Old South Clock 7 (spring 1995): 1.

2Len Travers, “‘You see I am addicted to facts’: Annie Haven Thwing and The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston,The Massachusetts Historical Review 1 (1999): 121–122.

3Ibid., 120–21.


The Daily Genealogist: Native Americans in 1494 Vatican Fresco

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

New Worlds Older: Native Americans in 1494 Vatican Fresco
The director of the Vatican Museums suggests that a detail in a newly-cleaned fresco may be “the first depiction of Native Americans” in European art.

The Daily Genealogist: Celebrating a 250-Year-Old House

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Celebrating a 250-Year-Old House
Yankee Magazine columnist Edie Clark wrote about the history of her venerable New Hampshire house and described the celebration she held when it turned 250 years old.

The Daily Genealogist: Mystery of 200-Year-Old British Soldier

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Mystery of 200-Year-Old British Soldier Found in the Dunes of Holland
Research on the remains of the soldier indicates he died in a brief conflict in August of 1799.

The Daily Genealogist: Marathon Memorials to be Archived by City

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

With Rain Coming, Boston Marathon Memorials Made of Paper at Copley Plaza Archived by City
During the process of collecting items to be moved to the city archives, archivist Marta Crilly expressed her feelings, “I'm really happy that these things are going to be preserved, and that this part of Boston's beautiful history, this outpouring of love, is going to be documented for people to see.”

The Daily Genealogist: How Long Have You Conducted Genealogical Research?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked how long you've been conducting genealogical research. 4,399 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • <1%, Less than 1 year
  • 9%, 1 to 5 years
  • 11%, 6 to 10 years
  • 15%, 11 to 15 years.
  • 13%, 16 to 20 years
  • 10%, 21 to 25 years.
  • 9%, 26 to 30 years
  • 16%, 31 to 40 years
  • 16%, More than 40 years
  • <1%, I am not certain how long I've been conducting genealogical research.

This week’s survey asks how many generations of your maternal line you have researched. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Ethelbert

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ETHELBERT (m): Derived from a compound of Anglo-Saxon æthel- "royal," "noble" + beohrt/berht "bright," this last derived from an Indo-European root *bherəg- "to shine," "bright," "white" (Calvert Watkins, The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, 2nd ed., 2000, p. 11). Æthelberht I of Wessex (ruled 860-865, a brief reign bedeviled by Viking raids) was the third son of Æthelwulf of Wessex. Æthelbert was preceded by an older brother Æthelbald (co-king with his father ca. 855-858, then full king 858-860), and was succeeded by his younger brothers Æthelred I (ruled 866-871), and, finally, Alfred [Ælfred] the Great (ruled 871-899). Alfred's grandson Æthelstan (ruled 924-939), the victor of Brunanburh, is the first king of all England (rather than Wessex).

The history of the Anglo-Saxon period was not much studied until the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, but New England does have the example of Ethelbert Child Lyon (1744-1787) of Woodstock, Conn., and Holland, Mass., a son of Moses and Grace (Child) Lyon of Woodstock. Moses Lyon, a Yale graduate, apparently enjoyed choosing learned names for his numerous offspring. The 1850 census shows 216 men with the name Ethelbert.

The name ALBERT developed from ADELBERT, a cognate Germanic form of both elements of this name. (Speak "Adelbert" fast, say five times, and you'll see how that first consonant falls out; ALICE evolved in much the same way from forms such as ADELICIA.)


The Daily Genealogist: Grosse Pointe Public Library, Michigan

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Grosse Pointe Public Library, Michigan

Grosse Pointe is a small city that borders Detroit. It is located in Wayne County, Michigan. The Grosse Pointe Public Library has made a number of resources available on its website. The resources include a local history archive and an obituary index. Click on the Local History Archives icon on the homepage to access them.

There are a number of resources in the Local History Archives. They include books, photographs, maps, and newspapers, among other resources. Click on the Books icon to access three local histories. The following volumes have been digitized and are available as PDFs: A History of Agricultural School District 1; Grosse Pointe Guide and index; and The Mansions of Grosse Pointe. Click on the Photographs icon and then the Library thumbnail to view the nearly 50 historical photographs of the Grosse Pointe Public Library. There are a dozen historical images under the Maps link.

Click on the Grosse Pointe Obituary Index link to access the index main page. The database is an index to obituaries and other articles associated with deaths found in two local newspapers, the Grosse Pointe News and the Grosse Pointe Review. The index covers the period from 1940 through 2009 with a few records from 1930. Beginning with 1940, each segment of the index comprises a five-year period. Each section of the index is organized alphabetically. The data fields are last name, first name, middle name, date of death, printed (publication) date, newspaper title, and page.

On the Local History Archives page, you will find a link to Grosse Pointe newspapers that have been digitized and uploaded to the library's website. The digital collection includes Grosse Pointe News (1940–present), Grosse Pointe Review (1930–1952), and Grosse Pointe Civic News (1923–1934). You can find the full text of an obituary by using the information found in the index. First, click on the thumbnail link one of the newspapers. Click on the year, then the date of publication. This will open a PDF file of the complete issue of the selected newspaper. Instructions on the website provide information on how to search for specific items. You can also search the entire database by entering a single word or an exact phrase in the search box. You can limit your search to a specific time period by selecting a decade from the drop down list.


The Daily Genealogist: Dorr Rebellion Resources

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

The Dorr Rebellion was a watershed event in Rhode Island history. Events began in 1841, when Providence native Thomas Wilson Dorr sought to expand the numbers of Rhode Islanders eligible to vote. At the time, with the Charter of 1663 still in force, less than fifty percent of white male Rhode Islanders were eligible to vote. Historian Marvin E. Gettleman, author of The Dorr Rebellion: A Study in American Radicalism (1973), wrote that "The most dramatic and bitter battle of the antebellum period took place in Rhode Island, where the movement for political reform took a radical and even revolutionary character."

The fall 2011 issue of American Ancestors magazine featured an article on the Dorr Rebellion: "Echoes from the Dorr Rebellion: the 1842 Aplin / Carpenter Correspondence," by John D. Tew. (NEHGS members can read the article online.)

I recently became aware of the Dorr Rebellion Project website, which is a terrific resource for anyone interested in the crisis. The website includes a nineteen-minute documentary, interviews with expert scholars, an image gallery, and links to relevant articles. Organizations and individuals involved with the project include Providence College; The John Hay Library, Brown University; The Rhode Island Historical Society; The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History; The Rhode Island School of Design; and Russell DeSimone.


The Daily Genealogist: The Flotsam That Defines a Family

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Junk Drawer Jesus and the “Flotsam” that Defines a Family

A daughter reflects on the process of cleaning out her parents’ home in East Boston.


The Daily Genealogist: Young Archivists Meet Like Minds

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Leaving Cloister of Dusty Offices, Young Archivists Meet Like Minds

This profile of the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York, a group with over 500 members, highlights some of the archivists and their collections.


The Daily Genealogist: Moon to Blame in Civil War Death

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Study: Moon to Blame in Civil War Death

A new study concludes that the light from a full moon played apart in the accidental shooting of Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.


The Daily Genealogist: Major U.S. Genealogical Repositories

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week's survey asked which major U.S. genealogical repositories readers have visited. 4,040 people responded to this survey. The results are:

15%, Allen County Public Library,Ft. Wayne, Indiana
4%, Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research, Houston,Texas
4%, Dallas Public Library, Dallas,Texas
22%, Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Library,Washington, D.C.
35%, Family History Library (FHL), Salt Lake City, Utah
23%, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
3%, Midwest Genealogy Center, Independence, Missouri
26%, National Archives, Washington, D.C.
30%, National Archives facilities outside of Washington, D.C.
43%, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) Research Library, Boston, Mass.
15%, New York Public Library, New York, N.Y
9%, Newberry Library, Chicago, Ill.
6%, Sutro Library, San Francisco, California
23%, I have not visited any of the above repositories.

This week's survey asks how long you've been conducting genealogical research. Take the survey now!


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