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The Daily Genealogist: Happy 200th Birthday, War of 1812!

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Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

"A primer on America’s most bumbling, most confusing, and most forgotten conflict.”

The Daily Genealogist: Going Back in Time to Unlock a Family Mystery

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Commentator Linda Chavez discusses the unexpected family history she learned when she was featured on Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

The Daily Genealogist: DNA Study Yields Surprising Clues

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Genetic evidence shows that the families historically called Melungeons are the offspring of sub-Saharan African men and white women of northern or central European origin.”

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Genealogical ebooks

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Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you tried to return a possession (a photograph, a book, a memento, or other item) to a descendant of the original owner, or whether you received one yourself. The results are:

41%, I have had an ancestral possession returned to me.
34%, Yes, I was successful in giving an ancestral possession to a descendant.
30%, I have never received an ancestral possession.
26%, No, I have never tried to find a descendant to pass on an ancestral possession.
14%, Yes, I tried to find a descendant to pass on an ancestral possession but did not succeed.

This week's survey asks about your interest in genealogical publications in an ebook format. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Dighton

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Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

DIGHTON [DEIGHTON]: Three daughters of Dr. John Deighton (bur. St. Nicholas, Gloucester, England 19 May 1640) came to New England: Jane (Deighton) (Lugg) Negus (1609–living 1671) of Boston, Mass.; Frances (Deighton) Williams (1611–ca. 1705-6) of Taunton, Mass.; and Katherine (Deighton) (Hackburn) (Dudley) Allin (1614–1671) of Roxbury and Dedham, Mass. A fourth sister, Damaris Deighton (1616-post 1646/7), whom her father named executrix, remained in England and married Samuel Nicholls of Twyning, Gloucestershire, gent. A house at 99-103 Westgate Street, Gloucester, which she inherited is now the Gloucester Folk Museum; deeds (Gloucestershire Archives, John Deighton collection, catalog D381, noted at www.a2a.org.uk 10 Nov. 2004 and 22 May 2012), are housed at the Gloucester Archives. An abstract of Dr. Deighton’s will appears in TAG 9 (1932-33): 218-19.

John and Hannah (Williams) Bird of Dorchester, Mass., had a daughter, Dighton (Bird) Myrick (1687–1726) of Dorchester and Taunton, Mass., named for her maternal grandmother Frances (Deighton) Williams. Dighton (Bird) Myrick was the mother (by husband Isaac Myrick/Merrick, Sr.) of Dighton (Myrick) Richmond (“late deceased” on 21 Feb. 1747, when her father wrote his will), also of Rebecca (Myrick) Hathaway (herself mother of a short-lived Dighton Hathaway [1756–1759]).

Dighton (Myrick) Richmond, in her turn, was mother of Dighton (Richmond) Pratt (ca. 1747–Manchester, N.Y. 14 Jan. 1809) who in turn had a daughter, Dighton Pratt (b. Taunton, Mass. 17 April 1772), and of Mary (Richmond) Richmond (ca. 1737–1776), herself mother of Dighton (Richmond) Blore (ca. 1773-after 17 Sept. 1850) and grandmother of two granddaughters, each named Dighton Blore (1813–1817, and b. 1820). Mrs. Blore is found at Butternuts, Otsego Co., N.Y., as a widowed head-of-household in 1840.

One suspects that the second Dighton Blore is the Dighton McClelland, 31, b. N.Y., in the 1850 Ward 10, Albany, N.Y., household of William McClelland, 32, b. Ireland (and their children Mary 15, Joseph 7, Elizabeth 6, William 4, and infant Richard) — and, in 1870, the Dighton Lagrange, 50, with daughter Dighton Lagrange, 11, in the Ward 10, Albany household of Abram Lagrange.


The Daily Genealogist: Arizona and Colorado Cemetery Databases

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Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Evergreen Cemetery, Bisbee, Arizona

The city of Bisbee is the county seat of Cochise County, Arizona. It is located in the southeastern part of the state, about eighty miles southeast of Tucson. The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum has made a cemetery database available on its website.

Established in 1892, Evergreen Cemetery replaced the Old City Park Cemetery. Old City Park Cemetery was located upslope from the drinking water wells in Brewery Gulch and it was felt that this posed a health risk to Bisbee residents. Beginning in 1914, the people buried in the old cemetery were moved to Evergreen Cemetery.

There are just over 15,000 records in the database. The information in the Evergreen Cemetery database comes from the following sources: City of Bisbee ledgers recording sale of graves (1912–1999), Mrs. Lillian Bilyeu Banchi & Mr. John Banchi’s compilation of "mortuary, church, and sexton" records (originals not available, 1927–1964), and Southern Arizona Genealogical Society & Arizona Pioneer's Historical Society records (1884–1926).

The cemetery database project is in its first phase. The second phase will include a physical inventory of the gravesites and information on the gravestones. Click on the link in the last paragraph to open the search page.

The cemetery index is organized alphabetically by surname. The data fields are # (number sign), last name, first name, alternate spelling, burial date, death date, grave number, section, and plot location. You can sort the records by any of the column headers (data fields) by clicking on the header. First click the check box in the ‘#’ field; then click ‘View’ to access an individual’s detailed record. The data fields in the detailed record include surname, first name, middle name, alternate spelling, spouse name, burial date, death date, age at death, infant child of, gender, burial permit number, grave number, section, plot, receipt number, map page, original comments, moved, date moved, new grave number, new section, new plot, cause of death, and tombstone comments. Click the ‘Back’ button to return to the database. If you find an error in the database you may provide the correct information by clicking on the Request Change button.

The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum also has placed an extensive collection of photographs on its website. These include historical and contemporary photographs of Bisbee, including some of the museum’s exhibits. Click on the Photo Archives link in the site’s contents list to view the captioned photographs.

Lakeview Cemetery, Broomfield, Colorado

The City and County of Broomfield own Lakeview Cemetery, an active cemetery incorporated in 1890. The City and County of Broomfield are located in central Colorado. The website contains an alphabetical listing of burials to 1955, a plat map of the cemetery, and a list of lot owners. The sources of the information for this index are copies of the original burial books housed at the Broomfield Depot Museum and a cemetery survey done in 1997. The data fields in the cemetery index are name, age, date of death, block, lot, and comments. The data fields in the list of plot owners, which is likely incomplete, are name, block, and lot.


The Daily Genealogist Note from the Editor: Hands-on Genealogy

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last weekend, I went shopping at a rummage sale sponsored by the Miles Memorial Hospital League in Damariscotta, Maine. My husband and kids and I found all kinds of treasures — books and a glass bowl and a doormat, to name a few items — and I happily paid for everything and headed to the car. My husband followed a few minutes later with a dusty old wooden trunk. I suppose he knew better than to get my opinion before he paid for it; I would have said no. Instead, I asked what he was going to do with it. He said he planned to "put stuff in it."

I didn’t have much more to say about the trunk until after we got home and he cleaned it. He came to report that there was a name on the trunk. Well, that got me interested. He couldn’t read the writing in the lid but I had no trouble deciphering “Rev. A. Zeller, 1518 Huey St, McKeesport, Pa.” Then I was off and typing.

Using Google, I soon had a reference to the Rev. Albert Zeller of McKeesport in an online edition of Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania (1915). Rev. Zeller, a German Evangelical minister, was born in Württemberg, and immigrated in 1855 to become a missionary to German settlers in western Missouri. Later, over the course of his 53-year career, he served in Cleveland, Buffalo, and Rochester — also “filling many pulpits by invitation.” I wondered if he used the trunk as he traveled to his various speaking engagements. I continued to look for more information and, on Ancestry.com, I even found a submitted ancestral chart and group sheet of the family — and a photograph of Rev. Zeller! (This information is accessible only to Ancestry.com subscribers.)

Next, I tried to identify Rev. Zeller in each federal census year but found no connection to McKeesport or any part of Pennsylvania. I returned to the Western Pennsylvania history and wondered if I was off by a generation. Rev. Albert Zeller’s son, also named Albert Zeller, was born in Centerville, Illinois, in 1866. In 1893, he arrived in McKeesport, where he set up a medical practice, married Harriet Trimble, and had three children. “The family residence is at 1518 Huey St., where Dr. Zeller erected a fine brick house in 1909.”

The trunk, though, clearly states “Rev.” A. Zeller — not “Dr.” My only theory is that Rev. Zeller may have visited his son in McKeesport — or perhaps even lived with him for a time — and labeled the trunk accordingly. And how did the trunk end up at the rummage sale in Mid-coast Maine? Perhaps a descendant of Rev. Zeller brought it north. I don’t suppose I’ll ever know anything further, although I’m sure the trunk’s journey would make a fascinating story if it could be told. Learning about Rev. Zeller has caused the trunk to acquire a lot more interest for me. I’ll make sure my husband puts some extra good "stuff" in it.


The Daily Genealogist: Family's ancestors declared free

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

On Good Friday, April 6, 2012, Wayne County, W.Va., Circuit Court Judge Darrell Pratt "issued a decree recognizing that Harrison Polley and three siblings had been freed in the mid-nineteenth century."

The Daily Genealogist: Turn Your Life into an Infinite, Living Memoir

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

This article offers useful guidelines for writing up your own life story.

The Daily Genealogist: War of 1812: Blood Ties

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

DNA testing on blood on a “War of 1812 red militia coat — on permanent display at the Hamilton [Ontario] Military Museum — is going to be part of a fascinating DNA analysis to connect [Titus Geer] Simons to relatives living today.”

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Ancestral possessions

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked which English county record offices near London would be of the most interest to researchers. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:

40%, None of the above.
27%, Essex
22%, Kent
21%, Suffolk
18%, Devon
17%, Norfolk
16%, Somerset

This week's survey asks if you have returned or received an ancestral possession. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Wallace

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

(WILLIAM) WALLACE (m): WALLACE derives from Anglo-Norman waleys [many variant spellings] which can mean a person from Wales; a person from the Welsh Marches; or a Scottish or other British person speaking one of the many Celtic languages then available.

The story of Sir William Wallace’s rise against the incursions of the English King Edward I (1239-1307, king from 1272) had great appeal, especially with the Romantic movement, which in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw a boom in everything Scottish. The Scottish Chiefs (1810) by Jane Porter (1776–1850) was one of the most popular early historical novels; its treatment of Sir William Wallace is romantic and sentimental, but a rousing read.

A look at the 1850 U.S. census shows approximately sixty men with the first and middle names William Wallace. They include William Wallace Dutton (b. abt. 1830 ) of Chelsea, Vermont; William Wallace McCall (b. abt. 1835) of Saratoga Springs, New York; and William Wallace Harrison (b. abt. 1820) of Paterson, New Jersey. There were likely many other William Wallaces whose full names were not listed in the census.


The Daily Genealogist: Chester County Archives and Records Services, Pennsylvania

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Chester County Archives and Records Services, Pennsylvania

Chester County is located in southeastern Pennsylvania. West Chester is the county seat. The Chester County Archives and Records Services has made a number of indexes available on its website. Click on the Online Indexes link in the site’s contents list to access them. You will need free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view these indexes. The following is an overview of many of the different types of records in the their extensive collection of online resources.

Birth, Marriage and Death Records
The indexes in this collection of databases include Births, Deaths and Marriages, 1852–1855; Birth Registers, 1893–1906; Coroners' Records, 1720–1957; Deaths, 1893–1907; Delayed Birth Records, 1857–1906; Divorces, 1804–1902; Marriage Contracts, Separations and Certificates, 1690–1890; Marriage License Applications, 1885–1930; Proof of Death Registers, 1875–1893; and Veterans' Burials, 1885–1979. The data fields in the Birth Registers, 1893–1906, index include last name, first name, middle name, place of birth, year, and volume and page number. For the Chester County Divorce Records, 1804 – 1902, the data fields are husbands last name, husband’s first and middle name and prefix/suffix, wife’s first name, year, court term, case number, docket number, page number, and grounds for divorce

Civil Court and Debt Related Records
The indexes in this collection include Affidavits, Depositions, Interrogatories, 1781–1834; Assigned Estates, 1821–1942; Equity Cases, 1844–1940; Inquisitions and Executions, 1700–1800; Insolvent Debtor's Petitions & Bonds, 1724–1850; and Letters of Attorney, 1774–1845.

Criminal and Prison Records
The indexes in this collection include Gaol (Jail) Keepers' Docket, 1804–1816; Languishing Prisoner Petitions, 1718–1790; Oyer & Terminer, 1802–1910; Prison Discharges, 1843–1872; and Quarter Sessions Indictments, 1681–1870. The Languishing Prisoner Petitions database contains records of petitions submitted to the court by prisoners who were seeking to be released from jail. The data fields in the database include last name, first name, charge, month, year, and comments. Comments include descriptive information, name of petitioner, servant status, and spouse information.

Land Records
The indexes in this collection include British Depredations, 1777–1782; Deeds, 1688–1830; Inquisitions and Executions, 1700–1800; Letters of Attorney, 1774–1845; Mechanics' Liens, 1828–1868; Petitions for Sheriff's Deeds, 1728–1835; and Sheriffs' Deeds, 1773–1875.

Military Records
The indexes in this collection include Board of Relief Records (Civil War), 1861–1865; Civil War Bounty Records, 1862–1865; Civil War Equalization Bounty & Pension Records, 1863–1868; Veterans' Burials, 1885–1979; and World War I Servicemen Records (County War Aid Association), 1917–1921.

Naturalization Records
There are two indexes to naturalization records filed in Chester County. The first covers the years 1798–1906 and second covers 1906–1935. The data fields in the earlier index are last name, first name, middle name, county, declaration year, declaration docket information, petition year, petition docket information, petition number and declaration number. The data fields in the 1906 – 1935 index include last name, first name, middle name, birth place, date of naturalization, date of petition, book and page number, petition number, date of declaration, and record of declaration.

Occupation and Licensing Records
The indexes in this collection include Chester County Commissioners, 1711–2008; Dog Register, 1855–1912; Peddler's Petitions, 1722–1869; Professional Registers, 1683–1970 Registry of Automobiles, 1903–1905; and Tavern Petitions, 1700–1923. If your ancestors owned a dog and lived in Chester County between 1855 and 1912 your might be able to learn what breed of dog they owned by looking and the Dog Register index. The data fields in the database include owner’s last name, owner’s first name, date of registration, residence, breed, entry number, and page number.

Pauper Records
The indexes in Pauper Records collection include Board of Relief Records (Civil War), 1861–1865; Poor School Children Records, 1810–1841; Poorhouse Records, 1800–1910; and Poorhouse Bound Apprentices, 1801–1825.

Probate, Estate and Guardianship Records
The indexes in this collection include Feme Covert Records, 1832–1848; Orphans' Court Bonds, 1746–1893; Orphans' Court Estates, 1714–1923; Register's Court, 1795–1917; and Wills and Administrations, 1714–1923.

Servant and Slavery Records
The indexes in this collection include Fugitive Slave Records, 1820–1839; Indentured Servants & Apprentice Records, 1700–1855; Negro Servant Returns, 1788–1821; and Slave Manumissions. The Manumissions index is sorted by slave and by master. Most of the manumissions took place prior to the mid–1830s. The data fields in the index include last name, first name and age of the slave, first name, last name and residence of the owner, book number, year, and page number.

Tax and Census Records
The indexes in this collection include Provincial Tax Minutes, 1756–1778; Septennial Census Returns, 1793–1856; Tax Discounts, 1785–1823; Tax Indexes, 1715–1799; Tax Index, 1805; and Tax Index, 1890.

 

* An condensed version of this article, with fewer index descriptions, appeared in the May 16 edition of The Weekly Genealogist newsletter. 


The Daily Genealogist Note from the Editor: More on Diaries

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Our diaries survey has prompted more email on this topic. Several writers emphasized the importance of placing copies of original diaries with historical organizations, and making the diarists’ words accessible.

Sheila Spencer Stover of Bunn, North Carolina:
I own the diary of my great-great-grandmother, Frances Bertha (Haight) Noxon, and transcribed and published it in the 1980s. More importantly, I donated a copy to the Tompkins County, N.Y., GenWeb site; the full transcript appears online. Frances was NOT the least bit careful as to what she wrote, or who she commented on. (The surnames mentioned include Breckinridge, Carpenter, Haight, Noxon, and Farrington.)

Charles Walker:
Some members of my extended family have inherited various portions of the family history, and keep it close to their chests. If you take a trip to Oregon or Tennessee, you will be permitted to see it, but otherwise it is unavailable. Please, I plead with you, give such documents to a university or historical society (with well-protected archives) that will promise to make it available. You may call it “keeping it in the family,” but we call it an inability to share. With so many threats (tornado, flood, fungus, mice, hurricane and fire), it makes sense to put originals where they can be accessed by all and content yourself with copies at home.

Debbi Wilmes of Haddam, Connecticut:
I have a year-long calendar book kept by my great-grandfather, who lived in Vermont. Most days he made a brief note about weather, crops, or purchases. Partway through the year, the handwriting changes. We know he lost part of his hand in a silage accident, but don’t know when it happened. I’ve often wondered if the change in handwriting indicates when the accident occurred.

John Tew of Purcellville, Virginia:
I have my paternal grandfather’s leather-bound, "A Line A Day" diary from his years at Phillips Andover in 1911–1914. I transcribed the entire diary — although more than a few pages are missing due to my grandmother's later expurgation of some of the rather bawdy writings of a hormone-driven teenage boy. Nonetheless, the diary gives a lot of insight into the teenage slang of the era, and mentions places and things I could research and use to annotate the diary with photos. One particularly special entry described how my grandfather took a photo with his Kodak "vest pocket camera" of his niece while on Prudence Island [R.I.]. He described her as standing tall with all her two years in a dress on the stern seat of the rowboat. The description rang a bell and, sure enough, I found the very photo he took 100 years ago! It was thrilling and a bit eerie to read his diary entry while looking at the photo. I also have the diary my maternal great-grandmother kept while her son was serving in Europe during WWI. The diaries are among my most treasured family genealogy items. (Oh, and, in my case, I am next to positive I have the diaries because I come from good New England packrat stock on both sides!)

Diaries at NEHGS

We can’t end our focus on diaries without a look at the NEHGS diary collection. Within the R. Stanton Avery Special Collections are the writings of more than 332 diarists in over 1,200 volumes, covering more than 150,000 pages. (This number includes copies as well as original diaries.) The diaries at NEHGS are kept in secure archival storage, and they are made available in a variety of ways. They can be viewed in person at NEHGS in Boston; some can be viewed and/or searched on AmericanAncestors.org; and excerpts of others can be read in the regular “Diaries at NEHGS” column in American Ancestors magazine. A guide to the NEHGS diary collection was published in 2008.


The Daily Genealogist: African-American's roots revised

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Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

"It's taken more than a decade for the 43-year-old Atlanta genealogist to fill in the story of those lost generations — a story that leads back to Cameroon, and then even further back to present-day Syria."

The Daily Genealogist: Six Generations of Daughters

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A Virginia family has six living members of a matrilineal line.

The Daily Genealogist: Son Writes Letter to Mom Every Day for 30 Years

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Prompted to begin writing to his mother after her car accident in 1981, a New Hampshire man has now written over 11,000 letters to her.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: English county record offices

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many genealogical conferences or programs you plan to attend in 2012. The results are:

46%, I plan to attend no genealogical conferences or programs.
20%, I plan to attend 1 genealogical conference or program.
17%, I plan to attend 2–3 genealogical conferences or programs.
13%, I don’t know.
3%, I plan to attend 4–5 genealogical conferences or programs.
1%, I plan to attend more than 6 genealogical conferences or programs.

This week's survey, asked by our Education Department, asks which English county record offices near London would be of the most interest to researchers. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Aramantha

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ARAMANTHA/ARAMINTA (f): The exquisitely lovely heroine of Aramantha: A Pastorall (1649) by the Cavalier poet Richard Lovelace (1618–1657). The element –nth- in Greek personal or place names (e.g. Aramantha, Corinth, etc.) is an indication of pre-Greek origin. ARAMINTA was the slave name of the great abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1820–1913). In the rough-and-ready spelling of colonial and Federal America, the name is often seen as EMERANSY or variants, even occasionally as EMERGENCY.

Thomas and Jedidah (Cleveland) Mayhew named two daughters Araminta Mayhew, b. Edgartown 7 Jan. 1820 (d. 22 Dec. 1821) and 26 Feb. 1822 (Edgartown VRs, p. 47); the second Araminta m. Edgartown 31 Oct. 1844 Robert S. Coleman, a tin worker from Nantucket (Edgartown VRs, p. 147).


The Daily Genealogist: Monroe County, New York, Cemetery Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Mt. Hope & Riverside Cemetery Records, Rochester, New York

The city of Rochester is located on the southern shore of Lake Ontario. It is the Monroe County seat.

The Department of Rare Books, Special Collections and Preservation of the River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester has made the Mount Hope & Riverside Cemetery Records database available on its website. This online resource contains records of the approximately 360,000 burials in Mount Hope Cemetery that took place between 1837 and 2002. The records of Riverside Cemetery through 2002 are also part of the database. Records since 2002 have been computerized and are available directly from the cemeteries.

You can search the database by entering the first two letters of the surname. If you know when the individual died you can select a date range from the menu box. The results include a link to the ledger book; click on it to view the ledger page. Look for the letter grouping containing the first letter of the first name of the individual whose record you are seeking and look for the person’s name. The data fields in the ledger book are subdivisions, date of interment, age, cause of death, residence, and where interred.

The website notes that although the Department of Rare Books & Special Collections maintains the databases for both cemeteries, the Department is not able to answer questions about burial locations, the names of others buried in a particular plot, and so on. This type of inquiry should be directed to the Friends of Mount Hope.

Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Rochester, New York

Rochester’s Holy Sepulchre Cemetery is located adjacent to Riverside Cemetery. According to its website, this 135-year-old cemetery is one of the largest and most active cemeteries in Rochester. I found this cemetery resource upon discovering that two members of my family are buried there. Click on the Locate a Loved One link to begin your search. The index can be searched by clicking on the Search by Name link in the contents list. Enter the following into the search box: last name only, first name only, or last name then first name. The results will appear below the search box. Each record is an active link. Click on the link to view the detailed record. The data fields in the detailed search results are name of deceased, cemetery, cemetery section, cemetery lot/tier, cemetery wall, grave number, burial date, additional cemetery information, and age. There are links to cemetery maps in the contents list on the left of the page.

Webster Union Cemetery, Webster, New York

The town of Webster is located in Monroe County, east of Rochester, near the southern shore of Lake Ontario.

This cemetery’s first burial occurred in 1820. The cemetery was established as a burial ground in 1824, and was first known as the Union Cemetery of Webster. Its name was officially changed to the Webster Union Cemetery in 1954. Click on the Burial Listings link to open a new page containing an alphabetical by surname index to burials. The data fields include last name, first name, middle/maiden name, age, birthplace, date of death, and lot, grave, and section numbers. Click on a data field to sort the records by that particular field. Burial plot maps are available on the website. They can be downloaded as PDF files. You will need the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the downloaded maps.


The Daily Genealogist: Diaries and a Recommended Website

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Diaries

I was impressed — and rather envious — to see the results of last week’s survey and realize that over a quarter of respondents own at least one ancestor’s original diary. That number seems to me to be quite high. Fortunately, many of our readers seem to come from families who valued their history or were, perhaps, simply packrats.

Carol R. Austin of Garden Grove, California, wrote about her research into two diaries:

I transcribed my great-grandmother’s diary of a trip from her home in Puyallup, Washington, back to her hometown of Gallipolis, Ohio, by Model T in 1926. I mapped their travels and annotated the diary to identify the family members they visited along their route, which went through Oregon, California, and Oklahoma, among other states. Later, I was asked to transcribe an 1867 diary written by an unidentified schoolgirl at the Patterson Institute in Kentucky. The diary had been found in the effects of a cousin after she died, and no one was able to read it or knew who wrote it. After I transcribed it, I was able to identify the diarist as Eliza “Nina” Boone (1848–1909), the paternal grandmother of the cousin, Nina Boone (Willmott) Tucker Gibbons. It must have been given to the younger Nina since she was named after her grandmother. Priceless!

A Recommended Website for British and Irish Researchers

In his latest Tour Talk newsletter for Great Migration Tour participants, Robert Charles Anderson, Director of the Great Migration Study Project, recommends Geograph Britain and Ireland. He writes:

On the home page, this website describes its mission as follows:

The Geograph Britain and Ireland project aims to collect geographically representative photographs and information for every square kilometre of Great Britain and Ireland.

11,338 contributors have submitted 2,897,398 images covering 265,092 grid squares, or 79.9% of the total.

The home page also includes a very small map of Great Britain and Ireland. Clicking on this map allows you to zoom in until you reach a page devoted to one of the grid squares. There you will find one or more images, almost always including the church if there is one in that grid square. Once you have had your fill of that particular grid square, there is also a little box which allows you to move to the next adjacent grid square in any direction. Or, you may return to the original map and set off in another direction.


The Daily Genealogist: Get Started on Your Family Cookbook

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A food editor and writer offers helpful advice on “building the family cookbook.”

The Daily Genealogist: Family Reunion Was Centuries in the Making

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

In South Orange, New Jersey, 265 Schwarzes attended a gathering of descendants of Mendel Schwarz and Bella Adler. 

The Daily Genealogist: Boyd Man Returns Missing Piece of Family’s History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

How a document-filled World War II briefcase was plucked from an abandoned storage unit and, after a decade passed, returned to a descendant

The Daily Genealogist: Stumbling Across a Rarity, Even for the Rare Book Room

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

“A few weeks ago, Ms. Malchodi opened yet another leather-bound book, one of more than 300,000 rare volumes in the hold of the John Hay Library” at Brown University – and discovered an unusual print by Paul Revere.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Genealogical Conferences

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked about ancestral diaries. (More than one answer could be selected.) The results are:

47%, No, I do not think that any of my ancestors kept a diary.
27%, Yes, I own the original diary of one or more ancestors.
15%, Yes, I have a copy of the diary of one or more ancestors.
10%, Yes, I can access the diary of one or more ancestors held by other people or institutions.
9%, No, I believe one or more ancestors kept diaries but I don't know what became of them.
3%, No, someone else owns the diary of one or more of my ancestors but I do not have access to them.

This week's survey asks about your plans for attending genealogical conferences this year. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origin: Lysander

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

LYSANDER (m): Greek, meaning “liberator.” Name of a Spartan general and naval commander, and a character in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Lysander Hard, b. New Milford, Conn. 25 March 1769, son of Abraham and Charity (Munsee) Hard, died in Medina, Ohio, in 1851. Lysander R. Clark, a boot maker, was b. Bellingham, Mass. in 1822, and died of consumption in Franklin, Mass., on 6 Dec. 1853.

The Daily Genealogist: Passaic County Historical Society Genealogy Club

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Passaic County Historical Society Genealogy Club, New Jersey

Passaic County is located in northern New Jersey. It is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area. Paterson is the county seat. The Passaic County Historical Society Genealogy Club was established in 1985 “for the purpose of advancing genealogical study and discovering, obtaining, preserving and perpetuating whatever may relate to genealogy, biography and family history in Passaic County, New Jersey.” The Genealogy Club has made a number of resources available on its website. Click on the “Resources On Line from the Collection” link to access them. The majority of the databases in this online collection are transcriptions. In some cases photographs and graphics have been provided; Click on the “Resources On Line from the Collection” link at the bottom of the homepage to access them.

The Passaic County Historical Society Genealogy Club online resources include the following:

Schools and Associations
This section includes lists of Passaic and Paterson high school graduates, Association of Exempt Firemen, DAR applicants, Hamilton Club Membership Roster, Paterson normal school graduates, residents of the Old Ladies’ Home of Passaic City, and members of the Paterson Rambling Club and the Riverside Athletic and Singing Club. The years spanned by these lists are 1873 through 1934.

Bible Records
This section contains extracted family records for more than twenty-five Passaic County families from Bibles in the historical society’s collection. A cross-referenced index to surnames has been compiled.

Cemeteries
There are seventeen cemetery-related databases in the collection. They include burial listings, narrative descriptions, a guide to Passaic County cemeteries, lists of lot owners, and a cemetery map.

Churches
There are a number of church-related resources, ranging from church histories to lists of church members and pew holders to marriages, baptisms, and cemetery tombstone inscriptions. The denominations include Catholic, Presbyterian, African Methodist, and Reformed Churches.

Newspaper Extracts
This section contains extracts from various local newspapers, in addition to information about newspapers in the Passaic County Historical Society’s collections.

Orphan Research
This section contains materials related to orphans in the Passaic and Paterson area. There are short histories of the Passaic Home and Orphan Asylum, Mount St. Joseph Home for Boys and Girls, the Paterson Orphan Asylum, and the St. Joseph’s Orphanage for Girls. There is also a list of “inmates” in the Paterson Orphan Asylum as of November 5, 1877. Each child’s full name and age is provided. Photographs of three of the asylums can be viewed by clicking on the link next to the title.

Other
In addition, the online resources include biographies and industry and business profiles. The heading “Passaic County and Its Environs,” includes the following: Franklin Twp. Births & Deaths 1861–1862; Who’s Who in Passaic County, 1917; Italian-American Who's Who, 1943; Principal Farmers in Passaic County, 1871-1874; Paterson Cholera Epidemic Death List, 1832 and 1849; and Pompton Lakes: Marriages, Births, Deaths, 1896, among others.


The Daily Genealogist: Lost Diary Key to Unlocking an Idaho Family’s History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A story of genealogical serendipity: how a diary was returned to a descendant of the original owner after many years

The Daily Genealogist: Permanent Record

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Permanent Record : Rose Vrana is 95. She Went to Trade School in the 1930s. I Found Her Report Card. Then I Found Her.
Paul Lukas relates new discoveries that have occurred since his story about finding 1930s student report cards from the Manhattan Trade School for Girls first appeared.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Ancestor Diaries

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Lynn Betlock

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked the location of the ancestor you’d most like to meet if you could travel back in time. The results are:

40%, New England
18%, The British Isles
10%, New York
10%, Other location in the Eastern United States
7%, Europe
6%, Location in the Central United States
4%, Canada
2%, Location in the Western United States
2%, I can’t decide.
<1%, Other
<1%, Asia
<1%, Africa

This week's survey asks about diaries in your family. Take the survey now!


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