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The Daily Genealogist: Cephas

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Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genelaogist

CEPHAS (m.) - Cephas is another name for Simon Peter [St. Peter] - fisherman, disciple, apostle and first bishop of Rome. CEPHAS is the Syriac or Aramaic word for ’rock.’ PETER (PETROS) is thus the same idea in Greek.

A quick look at the Bellingham, Mass., VRs reveals a branch of the Rockwood family that used this name: Cephas Rockwood, b. 25 May 1766, son of Joseph and Alice (Thompson) Rockwood; he was lost at sea 10 Dec. 1786 off Lovell’s Island (which the Bellingham town clerk, a notoriously bad speller, styled ’louvels eilon’) (Bellingham VRs, pp. 55, 207); and his nephew Cephas Rockwood, b. 12 March 1786, son of John and Eunice (____) (Smith) Rockwood (Bellingham VRs, p. 55); later known as Cephas Leland Rockwood (the middle name apparently honors his stepfather Aaron Leland), he lived many years at Chester, Vermont, later at Canton, N.Y., and died at Pewaukee, Wisconsin, 3 May 1844 (Vivian VaLera Rockwood, Four Centuries of American Descendants of Richard Rockwood of Dorchester 1633, Braintree 1636, Massachusetts, 2 vols. [Johnson City, Tenn.: The Overmountain Press, 2000], 1:176, 262, 367). The 1850 census lists 692 men with the name Cephas.


The Daily Genealogist: Canadian Cemetery Databases - Saskatchewan and Manitoba

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

City of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Regina is the capital of the province of Saskatchewan. It is located in the southern part of the province. The City of Regina owns and maintains two cemeteries - Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery and Regina Cemetery. City officials have uploaded a burial database for these cemeteries to the city’s website. The information in the database has been extracted from the official cemetery records held at the Cemetery Administration Office. The Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery database contains more than 34,000 records and the Regina Cemetery database contains nearly 10,000 records. Click on the Locate a Loved One link to access the cemetery database. Click on the Cemetery Database link to open the search page. You will also find links to cemetery maps in PDF format on the Locate a Loved One page.

The Online Cemeteries Database can be searched by last name, first name, year of death, age at death, and year interred. The search can be limited to a specific cemetery or you can search both cemeteries at the same time. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name(s), age at death, date of birth, date of death, date of burial, cemetery, and block-plot lot.

Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada

Neepawa is a town of about 4,000 residents, located in southern Manitoba. It was incorporated in 1883. The town of Neepawa has made the database for Riverside Cemetery available on its website. The earliest burial I found in the database occurred in 1877, and the most recent was in February 2013. According to the website, Riverside Cemetery is the furthest west location where a victim of the Titanic disaster was buried. Click on the search link. You may enter first names, last names, or a burial year in the search box. The data fields in the search results are last name, first/middle name, lot/block/range, and the interment date. If the deceased was an infant, it is noted on the name line. The search results are sorted by date.


The Daily Genealogist: A Further NEHGS Update

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Ted MacMahon

Ted McMahon
Vice President for Development and Member Services

NEHGS is profoundly grateful for the outpouring of support from our members near and far as we persevered through the historic week of bombings and manhunts in Boston. In the middle of it all, we hosted our Annual Meeting Weekend, for which hundreds of members traveled to Boston. Despite having to cancel our Friday night Annual Dinner due to a mandatory citywide lockdown, our Keynote Speaker and Honoree David Gergen and his wife Anne graciously changed their travel arrangements to be with us at our Annual Meeting, held on Saturday morning after the streets of Boston were declared safe again. It is clear that twenty-first century NEHGS members and staff are as adaptable as they are resilient.

The Daily Genealogist: Footloose in Archeaology

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Footloose in Archeaology
A foot doctor in Gloucestershire, England, describes her research project to compare and contrast ancient foot bones.

The Daily Genealogist: Don't Be Afraid of Your DNA

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Don’t be Afraid of Your DNA
An opinion piece in Popular Science advocates embracing a “lack of genetic privacy.”

The Daily Genealogist: Yiddish Enjoying a Worldwide Resurgence

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Yiddish Language and Culture Enjoying a Worldwide Resurgence
Philip Kutner, the organizer of a national Yiddish conference to be held in Pittsburgh next week, credits genealogy as a major reason for a Yiddish revival.

The Daily Genealogist: The Past Gets Personal

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

The Past Gets Personal with a Photograph
For a McCook, Nebraska, genealogist, an online posting led to a very meaningful image from 1969.

The Daily Genealogist: Regions of Interest

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked what location you prefer to focus your genealogical research efforts on. 3,967 people responded to the survey. The results are:

  • 39%, New England
  • 8%, New York
  • 4%, The Mid-Atlantic
  • 3%, The South
  • 5%, The Central United States
  • <1%, The Western United States
  • 3%, Canada
  • 4%, England
  • 5%, Ireland
  • 1%, Scotland
  • <1%, Wales
  • 2%, Germany
  • <1%, Italy
  • 2%, Other European country
  • <1%, Other location not listed above
  • 21%, I don’t have a preferred geographic location for my research

This week’s survey asks which major U.S. genealogical repositories you’ve visited. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Ananias

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ANANIAS (m): In the Bible, this name is found only in the Book of Acts, where it is borne by at least three people of notably differing character:

(1) Ananias, husband of Sapphira. This covetous couple, members of an early Christian church in Jerusalem, sold land and kept back the proceeds, and when rebuked by St. Peter, were struck dead (5:1-5).
(2) Acts 23:2 and 24:1 mention Ananias the High Priest, who in 23:2 ordered that Paul be struck on the mouth, and in 24:2, "descended with the elders, and with a certain orator named Tertullus, who informed the governor against Paul."

Probably the Long Island families (especially the Conklins) who favored this name were thinking of

(3) “a certain disciple at Damascus, named Ananias” who, acting on a vision from God, laid hands on the blinded Saul/St. Paul and restored his sight, after the latter’s conversion on the road to Damascus (Acts 9:10-17), or (4) “one Ananias, a devout man according to the law, having a good report of all the Jews which dwelt there” (Acts 22:12) [perhaps the same as (3)].

Ananias Conklin of Kings Swynford, Staffordshire; Nottingham; Salem, Mass.; and Southold, L.I. (TAG 21 [1944-45]: 48-58 had grandsons Ananias Conklin “Jr.” (East Hampton, L.I. ca. 1674-by 22 Oct. 1730) (Jeremiah and Mary [Gardiner] Conklin (TAG 21:58, 142-43); Ananias Conklin “Sr.” (Benjamin and Hannah [Mulford] Conklin (East Hampton, L.I. ca. 1672/3-by 26 Aug. 1740) (21:135), father (by wife Hannah Ludlam) of Ananias Conklin [Jr.], bp. East Hampton 21 Aug. 1708.


The Daily Genealogist: Omaha Public Library

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Omaha Public Library, Nebraska

The city of Omaha is located in the eastern part of the state about midway along the Nebraska-Iowa border. It is the seat of Douglas County. On the genealogy page of the Omaha Public Library’s website are a number of unique online resources. Most of the following are projects of the Greater Omaha Genealogical Society. These include:

Omaha Births
This database comprises a list of births in Omaha extracted from area newspapers. In some cases, children were born in Omaha to families who lived in areas outside of Douglas County, including Iowa. Nebraska did not mandate the registration of births until 1910, making this information particularly valuable. The data fields in the database include name of parents, date, newspaper abbreviation, page number, and child’s name or sex, in cases where there is no given name for the child.

Omaha Obits
This index contains more than 120,000 obituaries and death notices extracted from pre-1977 Omaha newspapers. The database includes records that appeared in Omaha newspapers for individuals who lived within an hour to an hour and a half from the city. Civil War veterans from a further distance have also been included. The information has been drawn from obituaries, funeral stories, personal coverage, and death notices. The data provided includes name, age, date of publication, newspaper abbreviation, edition, page, and burial location, which is preceded by an @ symbol. There is a link to information on obtaining copies of the obituaries.

Marriage License Indexes for Douglas County, Nebraska
This link takes researchers to the Douglas County Clerk/Comptroller’s Office website, where you can search the county’s database of marriage license applications. Enter the name of the bride or groom into the search box. You must enter the full last name and at least the first letter of the first name. While the webpage states that only marriage licenses since 1988 are online, I found records with earlier dates listed in the Marriage License Archives section of the search results. The data fields include name, spouse name, marriage date, application date/year, and license number.


The Daily Genealogist: Family to Bury WWI Hero Ancestor 96 Years After His Death

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Merseyside Family Set to Bury Their World War I Hero Ancestor…96 Years After His Death
The remains of John Harold Pritchard of London were recently identified in a French field, and will be buried in France in a military ceremony with 34 relatives in attendance. Family members became aware of the discovery through an online search launched by the Ministry of Defence and the War Graves Commission.

The Daily Genealogist: How Welsh Are You?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

How Welsh Are You? A Look Back at Your Welsh Family Tree Might Hold Some Surprises
“Welsh genealogy expert Susan Rainey says that she has never had a client who has had a purely Welsh bloodline. In fact, going back more than four generations of having entirely Welsh family is rare.”

The Daily Genealogist: Forgotten Documents Highlight Local Slave History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Bought & Sold: Forgotten Documents Local Slave History
“Thanks to a partnership between the register of deeds office and UNCA [the University of North Carolina at Asheville], Buncombe [County] has apparently become the first county in the country to digitize its original slave records, local officials and researchers say.”

Survey: Centuries of Interest

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked what century is the greatest interest to you in your genealogical research. 3,686 people responded to this survey. The results are:

  • 3%, The sixteenth century or earlier (prior to 1600).
  • 15%, The seventeenth century.
  • 22%, The eighteenth century.
  • 26%, The nineteenth century.
  • 2%, The twentieth century.
  • 33%, I don’t have a preferred century for my research efforts.

This week’s survey asks what region or country is of the greatest interest to you in your genealogical research. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: A Featured Blog — AncestryInk

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Our latest blog profile features AncestryInk, written by Jane Sweetland. Here, Jane introduces her blog:

As an adult, busy raising my family on an island off the coast of Massachusetts, I wasn’t interested in local history or family ancestral stories. An avid interest in maritime history, however, pulled me into other branches of historical research. Eventually I became associated with an underwater salvage team out of Provincetown searching for the wreck of a silver-laden ship belonging to Charles I that went down in the Firth of Forth. Researching shipwrecks in Edinburgh and St. Andrew’s in Scotland captivated me. As I discovered, history and genealogical research are inseparable. And the tales provided by captain’s logs, church records, and old cemeteries are exciting! I relentlessly pursued connecting the dots, closing circles, and finding how the lives of quiet, local people intertwined or made a difference as larger historical events unfolded around them.

An unresolved family mystery ultimately led to the creation of my blog AncestryInk: I had no idea who my great-grandfather was. Everyone in the family refused to talk about him. He was like Lord Voldemort in the Harry Potter books: “He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named.” My great-grandfather was a Scot from Maine, a man of the sea who reportedly had “a woman in every port.” That was all I knew. My research took me well over two years. I drew from the resources of Facebook, original family letters, the NEHGS research library, NEHGS and Ancestry online databases, Maine libraries and historical societies, Maine cemeteries, Family History Library microfilm, and much, much more.

I found that my great-grandfather, a master mariner who sailed between Nova Scotia, Maine, and Pennsylvania, married three times, and fathered ten children between 1882 and 1920 - even though he was on the high seas almost continuously! One of his wives divorced him, his second and third marriages may have been bigamous, and he abandoned many of his children. I found plenty of evidence for why he might not have been spoken of.

A desire to expand my research skills during this process prompted me to enroll in the Boston University Genealogical Research Program. I gained so much valuable information that I felt moved to share what I was learning by creating AncestryInk. A secondary interest in photography seems to mesh nicely with blog writing and, I hope, enlivens the experiences and information shared there. I discovered I come from a long line of seagoing folks and island inhabitants, and I am currently working on a project about an 1846 shipwreck off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard involving my ancestors.


The Daily Genealogist: Walking in the Footsteps of his Ancestors

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Walking in the Footsteps of his Ancestors
In 1793, Loyalist William Walker left North Carolina for Canada, where he was granted land in Grimsby Township and Clinton, Ontario. His descendant, William Timothy Walker, recently made the 820-mile journey, on foot, from Orange County, North Carolina, to Lincoln County, Ontario, in 68 days. (His blog — listed incorrectly in the article — can be found here.)

The Daily Genealogist: China Turns to Sea Burials

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Short on Graves, China Turns to Sea Burials
“Prices for graves are skyrocketing, driven by decades of unbridled development and scarce city land. The government’s answer to this conundrum: sea burials.”

The Daily Genealogist: Prototype of Digital Library to Launch in Boston

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Prototype of Digital Public Library of America to Launch in Boston this Month
“The beginnings of the first public, national, on-line library will soon be unveiled in Boston — home to the country’s first publicly supported municipal library.”

Survey: Sharing Genealogical Research

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week’s survey asked how you share your genealogical information. 3,898 people responded to the survey. The results are:

  • 94%, Email
  • 63%, Postal mail
  • 54%, Telephone calls
  • 46%, Online message boards or forums
  • 49%, Genealogical or historical website
  • 18%, Published book or article
  • 18%, Commercial website
  • 12%, Lectures and presentations
  • 10%, Personal website
  • 11%, Social media website
  • 5%, Personal blog
  • 2%, Someone else’s blog
  • 2%, Instant messages
  • <1%, Twitter
  • 14%, Other

This week’s survey asks what century is of the greatest interest to you in your genealogical research. Take the survey now!


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