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Ask a Genealogist: What happened to my Rev. War soldier and his pension?

(Military Records) Permanent link
 

Question:

My ancestor served two years during the Revolutionary War, and took part in many battles.  However he died in 1795 and I can not find a pension or bounty land for him.  I know Congress authorized pensions, is there a reason it is not there?

Answer:

The Pension Act of 1818 provided pensions for soldiers who did not have a disability from the service.  This Act of 1818 saw the largest influx of new applications for pensions.  Before that time it was typically disability or officer status was necessary to qualify for a pension.   You may wish to check for pensions and bounty land awarded by the state your ancestor served from.

Ask a Genealogist: What was a Whitewing in the 19th century?

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Question:

You seem to have a good handle on old occupations.  Can you tell me what a Whitewing did during the late 19th century?

Answer:

This was an occupation I was unaware of.  However I can tell you that a "Whitewing" was another name for a street sweeper.

Ask a Genealogist: Atlantic Canadian Railroad employees

(Occupations) Permanent link
 

Question:

I am looking for employment records fort Nova Scotia and New Brunswick Railroad employees.  Can you offer me a suggestion to locate these records?

Answer:

The Library and Archives of Canada in Ottawa, Ontario have some of the surviving railroad employee records online already.  You can search by first and last name of the records of the Railway Employees Provident Fund setup in 1907.  This collection deals with employees of the Intercolonial and Prince Edward Island Railway.  You can start your search online at: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/databases/black-porters/001051-100.01-e.php

Ask a Genealogist: English sources I need assistance with.

(Church Records) Permanent link
 

Question:

While looking over the notes of a cousin (now deceased) he mentioned using BT and PR for the English village our ancestor was from.  I am new to genealogy so I am unclear what the sources are.

Answer:

Often the church records in England for the Anglican church will have two sets of records preserved.  The PR = Parish records. These are the records of the baptisms, marriages and burials of the parish and are entered in as they occur.  Each year a copy is made of all the same records.  This transcription is sent to the local Bishop's office.  These records are the Bishop's Transcripts = BT.

Ask a Genealogist: What was a Peculiar Court?

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Question:

While searching for my relatives in Hampshire, England I started to search probates. I noticed that there were microfilm for a few "Peculiar Courts." Can you explain what these were?

Answer:

A Peculiar Court had limited jurisdiction for probate matters. It would be often limited to one parish, or small group of parishes. If the deceased owned property outside that particular parish or parishes, it would be handled by a larger court in the county.

Ask a Genealogist: What is a Cloth Looker?

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Question:

Can you describe what the occupation of a "Cloth Looker" was? I have seen this twice in parish records as an occupation.

Answer:

The "Cloth Looker" was in charge of quality control in the creation of woven cloth. Any defects that could be mended, or repaired were determined at this point in production. The "Cloth Looker" would also approve all woven cloth as a finished product.

Ask a Genealogist: Where and what was Camp Parole in the Civil War?

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Question:

Can you explain what "Camp Parole" was during the Civil War? It was a destination my ancestor was at during his military career.

Answer:

Camp Parole was once located in Annapolis, Maryland. It was used by the Union Army for recently paroled former P.O.W. (Prisoner's of War). When a Union veteran was released from a P.O.W. camp he was sent here before being sent home, or back to his military unit.

Ask a Genealogist: Nova Scotia probate records.

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Question:

As a new member of NEHGS I would like to know what the easiest way to use Nova Scotia probate records of the 19th century. Would it be easier to travel to Salt Lake City, or Nova Scotia to see a variety of counties?

Answer:

At NEHGS we have microfilm copies of all the Family History Library microfiln for probates and deeds for Nova Scotia. You can utilize a finding guide to determine which counties are arranged alphabetically, or best used with a calendar of wills, etc. If you have a specific question relating to our Microtext holdings please feel free to call 617-226-1239.

Ask a Genealogist: Final Payment Vouchers of the Revolutionary War

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Question:

Can you tell me how the Final Payment vouchers are arranged for Revolutionary War pensions?

Answer:

The Final Payment Vouchers are part of National Archive Record Group # 217 (or simply RG-217). They are arranged in alphabetical order by the state in which they collected their pension. Therefore you can request all the "Johnson" family in New Hampshire in one box. These records are consulted in person at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. They have not been digitized or microfilmed at present.

Ask a Genealogist: Preserving old newspaper articles.

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Question:

Are you aware of a good overview on preserving newspaper clippings, and folded newspapers?

Answer:

I have directed another patron to the following article from the Newseum in Washington, D.C.   The article can be found online at the following address: http://www.newseum.org/news/2010/02/preserving-newspaper-mementos.html
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