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The Garden Cemetery in Chelsea, Massachusetts.

(Boston, Cemeteries) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

 

Seeking Daguerreotype Conservation.

 Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Can you recommend a location to have a daguerreotype photograph restored?

 

Answer:  Many NEHGS members and colleagues have told me they have used the services of the Northeast Document Conservation Center with much satisfaction.  You lean more about their photographic conservation online at: http://www.nedcc.org/services/conservation.photograph.php


Looking for an ancestor in Townsend at the Eastward in 1771.

(NEHGS) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I am seeking the whereabouts of a location referred to in Dorchester, Massachusetts Vital Records for 1771 as "Townsend at the Eastward" where Zebadiah Williams, an ancestor of mine, died at age 24. 

 

Answer: Townsend of the Eastward appears to be an extinct region. Townsend was “formerly an indefinite territory between Sheepscot and Damariscotta Rivers” according to the book by Stanley Bearce Atwood, The Length of Breadth of Maine. (Augusta, ME: Kennebec Print Shop, 1946), p. 255 [NEHGS Call # REF/F17/A8].


Occupation of an ancestor in New Harlem in the 17th Century.

(New York, Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  In an early church record I find that my 17th century Dutch ancestor from New Harlem had the occupation of "Boerekverkooper".  Can you identify this occupation from those of the early New Netherlands?

Answer: When your ancestor resided in "Nieuw Haarlem" (Harlem) his occupation of "Boekverkooper" was a book seller or a librarian. I would suggest searching for your New Netherland territory ancestors in the NEHGS onlin edition of the New Netherlands Connection - http://web1.americanancestors.org/Search.aspx?Ca=098&Da=203


Ancestors in the Hudson, Massachusetts Poor Farm Cemetery.

 Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I find record that an ancetor was a pauper when he died in Hudson, Massachusetts in 1838.  I am trying to locate the almshouse and the cemetery associated with it. 

 

Answer:  The Pauper's Burying Ground in Hudson dates back to 1822.  The site is located at 565 Main Street in Hudson.  In 1993 a report was published by the Massachusetts Historical Commission on the investigations to the location of the cemetery.  At NEHGS we have this book - Edward L. Bell, Historical archaeology at the Hudson Poor Farm Cemetery (Boston: Mass. Historical Commission, 1993) call number F74/H82/B45/1993.


Ship Fever on a burial record in Canada from 1847.

(Cemeteries) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  On a burial record in 1847 I find the cause of death for a Canadian immigrant ancestor as "ship's fever".  I am not familiar with this cause of death, can you give me a current name for it?

 

Answer: The cause of death known once as "Ship Fever" is actually the disease of typhus.  The typhus epidemic that hit Canada in the late 1840's killed an estimated 20,000 between 1847-1848.  To read more about this 1847 epidemic in Canada go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhus_epidemic_of_1847


Looking for a Stone Dresser in 1860.

(Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: Can you tell me what the 19th century occupation of a "stone dresser" was? I found this occupation on a census from 1860 at NEHGS.

Answer: A “Stone Dresser” was the worker who did the intricate cutting of the stone. This work would allow the stone block to fit accurately in the building, or structure it being created for.

The Battle of Grape Island in 1775.

(Boston) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:

I understand one of the Leavitt’s from Hingham I am researching had his barn burned during the Revolutionary War.His barn was on his land on Grape Island in the Boston Harbor.Do you know any further details?

 

Answer:

Your story is correct.General Gage had sent orders to gather hay on Grape Island in Hingham Bay to gather Hay on May 21, 1775.When the British arrive upon the island they were attacked by the local militia.The hay they sought was owned by a Tory named Elisha Leavitt, and his barn was burned by the local militia to prevent another attempt to retrieve the hay.


U.S. War Department Records 1784-1800.

 Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I understand there were two fires in the 1800's that burned many records in Washington, D.C. at the War Department.  Are there any records surviving that were from these collections?

 

Answer: The War Department records were destroyed first in a fire in 1800.  Then during the War of 1812 additional records were destroyed when the British burned Washington, D.C. in 1814. Recently a new website has been created to transcribe various records that existed fromm 1784-1800 that would have been associated with the War Department collection.  You can search this by keyword and other search criteria online at: http://wardepartmentpapers.org/


What was the official cause of death during the Civil War for a soldier.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Reading a letter written by my ancestor in the New Hampshire Civil War Artillery I find a passage I am unclear about.  "Today Thomas was sadly killed by a dallgrin".  Do you have any idea what he was referring too?

 

Answer: The answer is probably a "Dahlgren Cannon".  Perhaps he was near one that exploded, or was killed by the results of being shot by one.  This smooth bore cannon was created in 1856, and was popular during the Civil War.  To find out more about this type of cannon with images go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dahlgren_gun


Looking for a Civil War cemetery at Togus, Maine.

(Cemeteries, Military Records, New England) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: While going through the pension file for my great-great Uncle I have a location at a cemetery he was buried in.  Do you know why he was buried in Togus, Maine if he did not live there?

 

Answer: The Eastern Branch of the Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at Togus is actually in Chelsea, Maine.  It served as the residence where many New England Civil War veterans lived starting in 1866. Some veterans and their spourses are buried in the cemetery located there.  The actual records for Soldiers Home survive and are on National Archives microfilm and also on Ancestry.com.  Since you have a burial location the following cemetery map may be of some use to you: http://www.cem.va.gov/CEM/cems/maps/togus822.pdf   If you would like to confirm other burials at the Department of Veterans Affairs offers a Nationwide database which includes Togus at: http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/j2ee/servlet/NGL_v1


New Brunswick Land Grants Online.

(New England, Deeds) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: Can you tell me the easiest way to search for New Brunswick land that was assigned by the British Crown in the 19th century?

 

Answer: I would suggest you start with the index of New Brunswick Land Grants which is available online from the New Brunswick Provincial Archives.  You can search the Land Grants covering the period of 1784-1997, covering over 54,000 records.

 

To begin your search go online to:

http://archives.gnb.ca/APPS/GovRecs/RS686/Default.aspx?culture=en-CA


Can my cousin call and ask about getting started in genealogy?

 Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online GenealogistAn

Question: I have a cousin who is very interested in genealogy. Is there anyone at your organization who would not mind spending some time chatting with her about her questions? She is 92 years old and would love to see where she should begin.

 

Answer: Please feel free to have your cousin reach me via telephone or email.  I would be delighted to chat with her about her family research. I can understand that she may have wonderful memories and family stories she wishes to preserve.  If I can be of any help please have her call me at 617-226-1222, or email: onlinegenealogist@nehgs.org.


What an Upright Worker was in 1881 Ontario, Canada.

(Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: In the 1881 Census of Ontario, Canada  I notice that my ancestors job in the city was an "Upright Worker".  I assume this is an occupation and not a compliment of his work ability.

 

Answer:  I am sure your ancestor was an outstanding employee in 1881, however this is referring to his job title.  An Upright worker in 1881 was another name for a Chimney sweeper.


Hand drawn Massachusetts Maps from the era of the George Washington Administration.

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I understand there are hand drawn maps of many of the Massachusetts cities and towns in the 1790's?  Where are these located in Massachusetts to view?

 

Answer:  The collection you are referring to I have blogged about before in December.  However I am always glad to discuss the wonderful maps at the Massachusetts State Archives.  The collection you refer to is the Maps and Plans of Massachusetts series of 1794.  To find out more about seeing copies of these maps in person go to: http://www.sec.ma.us/arc/arccool/colidx.htm  In most cases these maps indicate the land owners on each map.


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