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This Week’s Survey: Land Records

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about your genealogical interest in the South Atlantic states. It will come as no surprise that Virginia was the highest, with 75% of respondents interested. Florida was last, with 22%. Complete results are:

 

• 75%, Virginia

• 49%, North Carolina

• 35%, West Virginia

• 29%, South Carolina

• 24%, Georgia

• 22%, Florida


This week we ask about your experience in researching land records. Take the survey now!


Spotlight: Salem Public Library, Ohio

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Salem, Ohio, straddles the border between the counties of Columbiana and Mahoning in the northeastern part of the state. The Salem Public Library has made a number of resources available on its website.

 

Salem Public Library Obituary Index
This database indexes obituaries appearing in the Salem News from 1963 to 2010. Current (2010) obituaries are being added on a regular basis. Obituaries for 1962 are being added as well and will be posted online when the data entry has been completed. Issues for a number of months during this period are missing. They are January–March 1964, March–April 1966, September–October 1969, and July–August 1974.

 

The database can be searched by the last name of the deceased. The data fields in the search results include last name, first name, date of birth, and date of death. There is also a link to a detailed record, which includes some or all of the following information: date of birth, birth place, date of death, age at death, date obituary appeared in the newspaper, maiden name, parents' names, mother’s maiden name, and date of marriage, as well as the spouse’s name, maiden name, and date of death for up to three spouses. You may order a copy of the original obituary in PDF format from the library via email.

 

Grandview Cemetery Database
This database indexes the burial records of Grandview Cemetery in Salem. It can be searched by the last name of the deceased. The data fields in the search results include full name, address, and date of death. Click on the View Details link to view a detailed record, which includes some or all of the following information: name, address, age, race, sex, marital status, military service, place of birth, dates of death and burial, location of the grave (section, lot and grave numbers), lot owner’s name, lot and interment book information, funeral home, and next of kin. You will also find a link to a cemetery map showing the locations and numbers of the various sections of the cemeteries.

 

The Hise Journals

The Hise Journals were written during between 1846 and 1884, by Daniel Howell Hise (until Daniel's sudden death in November 1878) and by his nephew / son-in-law (from January 1879 until the nephew's death in August 1884). The final volume, which ran from mid-September 1883 is missing. The rest have been transcribed and are available in PDF format on the Salem Public Library website. The introduction to the transcribed journals details the long work that went into making them available through the library. Click on the Hise Family Photos link to access family photographs. Next, click on the Hise Journals link to open the PDF document of approximately 1,400 pages of journal entries. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the journals.


NY Marks 100th Anniversary of Capitol Fire

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Four days after the Triangle Fire in New York City, a fire spread through the state capitol at Albany. The disaster, according to the man who served as the State Library's director before and after the fire, was unequaled in the history of modern libraries. The fire is estimated to have destroyed about 500,000 books and 300,000 manuscripts; only 7,000 books and 80,000 manuscripts were saved. The blaze also destroyed 8,500 artifacts in the New York State Museum, including irreplaceable Seneca Indian craftworks. WHDH TV reports on more of the story.

Mocavo.com

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

As mentioned above, Google has become a vital resource for genealogical research. Last week saw the launch of a new website designed to take the best features of Google and make them easier to use for genealogical research. Cliff Shaw, CEO and founder of Mocavo, has a long track record of creating valuable products for genealogists. The GenForum message boards (now available on Genealogy.com), GenCircles.com, and Family Tree Legends software are just some of his significant contributions to the field.

 

Mocavo.com is the world’s largest free genealogy search engine. It provides access to free genealogy content on the web. Mocavo indexes publicly accessible websites and sends searchers directly to the sites. It is a great way to do one-stop searching of websites like the Internet Archives, Find a Grave, state archives and historical societies, Ellis Island, and more.

 

The best thing about Mocavo is that it specifically targets genealogical websites, automatically removing extraneous results (like Facebook pages, etc.) that appear in Google searches. This function is extremely helpful, especially when researching a very common name. While there are times I wish to cast a wide net with a Google search, it is very nice to have a search engine that filters out all of that noise for me.

 

For the best results, put names in quotes. Mocavo will automatically search for instances of “firstname lastname,” “lastname, firstname,” and even “firstname middlename lastname.” You can do “or” searches (looking for this “or” that) by utilizing the pipe symbol |. The | is usually above the Enter key on an American computer keyboard. Similarly, you can omit certain words by using the minus sign (or dash).

 

While I found many results I have already seen on Google, I have been overjoyed to see the results limited to genealogy results only. In researching my book on the descendants of Josiah Franklin, I’m sure you can imagine how many non-genealogical sites make mention of Benjamin Franklin!

 

The site is currently very centered on North American materials, but this is starting to change. Materials from GenUKI are available, and the Ireland Genealogy Project just announced that their materials will soon be indexed and available through Mocavo.

 

Mocavo is always looking for new information to index, and users can suggest websites for the site to index. Everything from large archives and websites to individual family blogs have been indexed, bringing additional traffic to many sites. Unfortunately, a few groups, such as USGenWeb, have restricted access to Mocavo’s indexing, and these materials are unavailable. While it is understandable why groups with gated access (such as Ancestry.com, AmericanAncestors.org, and FamilySearch.org) have not been indexed, it is difficult to understand that those with free and open accessibility would not want to provide greater access to their materials. Mocavo is totally free for users, and does not pretend to own any of the content; it only makes it easier for users to find information. Even more perplexing is that USGenWeb, for example, while precluding access from Mocavo, freely allows Google’s indexer to crawl the site and bring users in. One would think that they would want more genealogy-specific users to find them.

 

Mocavo.com is an excellent addition to the genealogical researcher’s toolkit. I’m certain it will only become increasingly valuable (and popular) as more sites are indexed and users discover how tremendously useful this resource is.


Spotlight: Missouri Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

McDonald County Public Library

McDonald County is located in the southwest corner of the state of Missouri, bordered by Oklahoma and Arkansas. Pineville is the county seat. The McDonald County Public Library has made family and local history resources available on its website. Click on the Genealogy link in the contents list on the main page to access two of them.

     

McDonald County Marriage Records from 1865 to 2009

This alphabetical index comprises all marriage licenses issued in McDonald County from October 1865 to December 2009. The data fields include the following: grantor (husband) full name, grantor’s address (city), grantee (wife) full name, grantee address (city), date the license was issued (year, month, day), and Recorders book and page information. The list is sorted alphabetically by grantor (husband’s) surname. Click on the first letter of the last name of the grantor (husband) to browse through the lists. The index can be viewed online or downloaded in its entirety to computer in a spreadsheet format. Copies of marriage licenses, the originals of which are held by the office of the County Recorder of Deeds, may be ordered for a small fee.

     

McDonald County Area Obituaries

The obituary database contains records from the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Click on the first letter of the last name to browse through the lists. You can also search through the database by using your web browser’s Find function. Data fields in the index include last name, first name, middle name, maiden name, nickname/miscellaneous information, date of death, newspaper title, cemetery name, cemetery city, and cemetery state. The nickname/miscellaneous information field contains information such as occupation and the names of the deceased’s parents or spouse, military service, and deceased individual’s nickname as well as items such as a description of an unusual cause of death. Copies of original obituaries can be ordered from the library.

     

Local History

Clicking on the History link on the homepage will open a new page with access to the databases described above in addition to a downloadable local history volume, Sturges History of McDonald County, which was printed in 1897. This volume has been reconstructed from a number of sources, as a complete copy could not be found when this compilation was created. It is nearly complete. It also should be noted that the biographical listings found in Chapter 13 have been put into alphabetical order for the convenience of local and family history researchers. The document is in PDF format, so you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it.

 

Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Missouri

Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis operates seventeen cemeteries. On its website you will find information about all of them. There are maps, photographs and historical information about many of them. The database contains more than 500,000 burial records. Click on Historical button in the contents list to learn the histories of the cemeteries. There are also links to cemetery photo galleries and photo slide shows. Click on the Burial Search button to begin your search.

     

The database may be searched by last name, first name, age, burial year and gender. You may search all of the cemeteries at one or choose a single cemetery to search by itself. The data fields in the search results include interment number; cemetery; first name; last name; male/female; burial date; age; and section, row and lot number. The lot number is an active link. Click on the link to open a new page with complete data on all of the individuals buried in that particular lot, which might prove to be quite useful in your family history research.


Name Origins: Heman

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

HEMAN (m): A son of Zerah, with brothers Zimri, Ethan, Calcol and Dara (1 Chron. 2:3).

Genealogical Writing: Indexing

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

One of the best resources for indexing your genealogy is Indexing Family Histories: Simple Steps for a Quality Product by Patricia Law Hatcher and John V. Wylie. Published by the National Genealogical Society in 1994, it is currently out of print but available at many libraries and genealogical societies. The following guidelines are just some of the many valuable pieces of information in the book.

   

Many factors go into producing a good index, not the least of which is the formatting. When publishing 6”x9” pages, it is best to have a two-column index. Three columns work well for an 8.5”x11” book. The type style should match the text and be one to two points smaller than the main part of the book.

    

A long list of subentries and page numbers separated by semi-colons written in paragraph style after the main entry is difficult to read and should be avoided. Each subentry should be indented about .25” under the main entry. Page numbers should appear immediately after the subentry, preceded by a comma. Do not right-align page numbers as this is also very difficult to read.

    

An introductory paragraph is an excellent way to communicate how the index works, what items were and were not indexed, and how multiple entries were combined or cross-referenced. This will make the index crystal-clear to the reader.


A Great Institution Rises and, with it, the Healing Arts

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Boston's first general hospital did what it could for the poor; today it brings cutting edge care to the city and the world. The Boston Globe profiles Massachusetts General Hospital on its bicentennial.

This Week’s Survey: Genealogical Societies

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week we asked about ancestors buried in military cemeteries. 47% of respondents have a relative buried in a cemetery other than Arlington. Full results are:

 

  • 47%, I have a family member buried in a National Cemetery other than Arlington

 

  • 45%, I have no known family members buried in an American military cemetery

 

  • 16%, I have a family member buried in Arlington National Cemetery

 

  • 8%, I have a family member buried in one of the American Battle Monuments Commission cemeteries in foreign countries.

 

This week we ask about your memberships in genealogical societies. Take the survey now.

Spotlight: Ontario, Canada, Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Historic Niagara Digital Collections, Niagara Falls Public Library, Ontario
Niagara Falls is located on the Niagara River in the Golden Horseshoe region of southern Ontario, across the river from Niagara Falls, New York. The city was incorporated in 1903. The Niagara Falls Public Library has made a number of resources available on its website. Descriptions of two of these follow.

 

Newspaper Index
The database is an index to birth, marriage and anniversary announcements, death notices, and news articles related to the city of Niagara Falls that can be found in the Daily Record, the Evening Review, and the Review, as well as other area newspapers. Detailed information on the years indexed can be found by clicking on the link on the main Newspaper Index page. The index covers births, deaths and marriages for various periods between January 1908 and the present. There are gaps in the years indexed. News articles have been indexed for various years from January 1908 to January 2004. Post-2004 articles are currently being indexed. Newspapers for 1913 are believed to no longer exist.

 

Enter a keyword, headline word, or subject word to run a simple search. The advanced search function allows one to limit the search by date, by type of article, or newspaper source. Researchers can also browse the collections by name (creator or contributor) or by subject. The data fields in the search results include headline, page number, date, newspaper title, and type of article. Click on the Headline link for the detailed record, which has additional fields such as creator (writer), notes, and subject area(s) under which the article falls. Subject(s) is a link. Clicking on that link will bring up all articles falling under the subject. For example, there are 387 articles under Niagara River and Falls — Daredevils and Stunters.

 

On the Historic Niagara Digital Collections search page you will find a link to an index to the Welland Tribune, which can be found on the Welland Public Library’s website.

 

Images Database
This database contains an index to the collection of images in the holdings of the Niagara Falls Public Library's Local History Collection. The types of images include are photographs, postcards, negatives, daguerreotypes and digital images of selected print material. The subject areas include portraits; the city of Niagara Falls; businesses and stores; the Niagara River; Niagara Falls; construction; streets; sports, recreation and leisure; buildings; factories and industries; Chippawa, Ontario; churches; aerial views; ships; events; and historic buildings.

 

The database may be searched by keyword(s) and restricted by medium. Search results are in the form of a thumbnail image and a brief description. The data fields in the brief description include title, description, notes, date, collection name, and a filing number and format for physical items. Click on the title link to enlarge the image and view a detailed description of the item in the search results.

 

Greenwood Cemetery, Owen Sound, Ontario
The city of Owen Sound is located on Georgian Bay in the northern Great Lakes area of southwestern Ontario. It is the county seat of Grey County. The city has created an online index to the approximately 20,000 interments in Greenwood Cemetery and St. Mary’s Cemetery available on its website. The vast majority of the burials indexed in the database took place in Greenwood Cemetery. The index is in PDF format. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to download it. The data fields in the database include lot ID, grave number, name of the interred, person’s title, age, burial date, and date of death. Click on the Cemetery Map and Interment List Legend link to open a page with a key to the abbreviations and a map of the cemetery, which can also be downloaded in PDF format.


Name Origins: Alexander, Alexandra, and Sandy

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ALEXANDER (m): The Latinized form of Greek ALEXANDROS (an alternate name of Paris, Prince of Troy). The name owes its popularity, however, to the brilliant Alexander III the Great, King of Macedon (356-323 B.C., ruled from 336), who conquered most of the then-known world in 13 years.

 

ALEXANDRA (f): The female equivalent of ALEXANDER. It became especially popular in Britain with the marriage in 1863 of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, to the very beautiful, very forbearing Alexandra of Denmark (1844-1925, Queen Consort 1901-1910).

 

SANDY (m): Scottish nickname for ALEXANDER, from which the surnames SANDERS, SANDERSON, etc. are also derived.

 

SANDY, SANDI (f): Popular current nickname for SANDRA, a shortening of ALEXANDRA.


Genealogy Merit Badge

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

USScouts.org is a group of volunteers who put together resources for youth and adults involved in the Boy Scouts of America program. They provide a great deal of information based on their experience participating in the program. 

    

Among the resources is information on the more than 100 merit badges that scouts can earn. Among the many badges is one for genealogy. USScouts lists the 9 requirements of earning the merit badge. I was pleased to see that one of the requirements was to interview a relative or family acquaintance about the family. They are also required to keep a journal for six weeks, writing in it at least once a week. 

    

Scouts are required to name three types of genealogical resources and how then help. They must obtain at least one document and explain how they would evaluate the information included in it. They must also explain how photography (including microfilming) has influenced genealogy. 

    

USScouts provides sample pedigree charts and family group sheets in both Microsoft Word and Adobe PDF format. I found it fascinating to read all of the requirements. It does make me wonder how qualified the scout leaders are who are judging the merit badge requirements. You can see the full requirements (and guess how you would do) at USScouts.org.


This Week's Survey: Military Cemeteries

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked which states in the Midwest, if any, hold genealogical interest for you. For most of the week Illinois and Ohio moved back and forth between first and second place. Over the last couple of days, however, Ohio took the lead and is first with 60%. Illinois is a close second at 56%. Indiana and Michigan tied for third at 39% with the exact same number of votes. The state with the least reader interest is North Dakota at 11%. Full results are:

  • Ohio, 60%
  • Illinois, 56%
  • Indiana, 39%
  • Michigan, 39%
  • Iowa, 37%
  • Wisconsin, 35%
  • Missouri, 33%
  • Minnesota, 28%
  • Kansas, 27%
  • Nebraska, 20%
  • South Dakota, 12%
  • North Dakota, 11%

 

Two weeks ago we asked about your genealogical interests in the Mid-Atlantic states. This week we ask about family members buried in American military cemeteries. Take the survey now!


For First Time in Decades, Arlington National Cemtery Must Bury Multiple 'Unknowns'

 Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

 Kathryn Condon, newly appointed director of the Army Cemeteries Program, discusses with the Washington Post the severity of the situation at Arlington National Cemetery. She concedes that it will not be possible to correctly identify all of the graves and remains at the cemetery.

Spotlight: Genealogy Society of Craighead County, Arkansas

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Craighead County, located in northeastern Arkansas, has two county seats: Jonesboro and Lake City. The Genealogy Society of Craighead County has made a number of resources available on its website. Click on the County Records link on the banner at the top of the page to access these resources.

     

Newspaper Obituary Indexes

     

Monette Weekly Sun: This database covers the period from 1962 through October 31, 1968, when it ceased publication. The information provided includes the full name of the deceased, the date of the newspaper, page number and column number. In some cases additional information is provided, such as residence of the deceased, cause of death in unusual circumstances (murder/suicide), notation of a photograph, and probate.

     

The Jonesboro Sun: This alphabetical database indexes death notices found in Jonesboro newspapers between 1885 and 2010. There is a separate index for obituaries published in 2011. There is an explanation of how the index is organized and a list of newspaper title and column abbreviations. You should read this prior to using the index. In addition to death notices and obituaries, the index also includes the names of individuals who were described as critically ill or not expected to live. If known, the name of the cemetery in which the deceased was buried is included.

     

Vital Records

     

Divorces: These indexes are organized by district. The Lake City Courthouse is in the Eastern District. There are three databases that index the Lake City Chancery Books for the period from 1884 to 1950. There is a single database for the Jonesboro Courthouse, in the Western District. It covers the period from 1878 through 1897. Data fields include plaintiff, defendant, date of the divorce, book and page number.

     

Marriage Records Index: The marriage records indexes are also organized by district. The grooms and brides indexes for the Eastern District cover the period from 1883 through 1954. Data fields include groom’s name and age, bride’s name and age, date of marriage, book number and page number. The grooms and brides indexes for the Western District cover the period from 1878 through 2003. Data fields in the database include groom’s name, bride’s name, year, book and page number.

     

Cemeteries


The cemeteries page contains separate alphabetical databases for more than eighty Craighead County cemeteries. Tombstone information has been transcribed and cemetery location information has been provided, at times including maps. The format for the data varies from cemetery to cemetery.

     

Additional Resources

     

Among the other resources available are:

     

a transcription of a portion of the 1906 Jonesboro business directory on the website

     

transcriptions for the 1860, 1870, and 1880 U.S. Censuses for Craighead County

     

a map of county townships

     

a PDF file containing history of the county written as part of a 1917 project by the women’s clubs of Arkansas to prepare a history for each county in the state

     

Many of the website’s resources can be searched from a keyword search box on the lower part of the homepage. You can use this Search Engine to search all pages created and maintained by the Genealogy Society, The Jonesboro Sun including obituary index and the Craighead County marriage index.


Neglected Graves Home to ‘Invisible Dead’

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

CNN reporter John Sepulvado talks with Duncan Shropshire of Gore, Georgia, on cemeteries that are being lost to the ravages of time and memory.

Genealogical Writing: Selecting Type

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Part of publishing compiled genealogies is selecting an appropriate font and typeface to use. Font and type selection can make the difference between a polished work and one that looks less clean and more amateur. Fortunately there are a few simple rules to follow in selecting your fonts that can make you shine like a star.

 

There are two major types of type. Serif fonts have small accents, called serifs, on the end of the strokes in the letters. Serif fonts are used for body text in printed works because the serifs help the eye to keep the traveling along the lines in long blocks of text.

 

Times and Times New Roman have been the default fonts in word processing programs for years. As such, they now have an amateurish look about them. Neither should be used in publishing your family history. There are a number of serif fonts that will make your work look much more professional. Garamond and Palatino, for example, are two fonts that are commonly used by the Newbury Street Press when publishing books.

 

Sans-serif type is more straight, and do not have the serifs on them. The name comes from the French “sans” which means “without.” Another term for this type style is Gothic, although this is now an outmoded term. Sans-Serif fonts are traditionally used for headlines instead of body text. Sans-serif fonts have also become the standard for electronic publishing (CDs, websites, etc.). Serif fonts do not display well on many computer monitors, and so are rarely used in electronic publishing. Arial was the default sans-serif font in word processing programs for many years, so again should be avoided in your publishing. Calibri is an excellent choice for a sans-serif font.

 

Emphasizing text should also be used sparingly. If everything is bold or italicized, nothing will stick out. And avoid italics in electronic publishing. It can be very difficult to read on computer monitors, especially on smaller monitors.

 

When selecting a font from your word processor or web page creation software, you will often be provided with a wide variety of choices. Remember that just because you have 100 fonts in your word processing software, it doesn’t mean that you should use them all in a single document. As a rule, try to choose a single serif font and a single sans-serif font for your work. Specialty fonts (that make your type look like the wild west, for example) should be used sparingly, if at all.

 

Smashing Magazine  published a helpful story in December 2010 entitled What Font Should I Use?”: Five Principles for Choosing and Using Typefaces


This Week's Survey: Midwest States

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about pedigree collapse in your ancestry. We asked, within twelve generations, the number of multiple descents you had from an ancestor or ancestral couple. 49% of respondents had 1 to 5 multiple lines. The lowest percentage, 2%, was the group with 20 to 25 multiple lines of descent. Complete results are:

 

49%, 1 to 5 multiple lines

17%, 5 to 10 multiple lines

14%, No multiple lines within 12 generations

9%, 10 to 15 multiple lines

5%, more than 26 multiple lines

4%, 15 to 20 multiple lines

2%, 20 to 25 multiple lines

 

Two weeks ago we asked about your genealogical interests in the Mid-Atlantic states. This week we ask about the Midwest. Take the survey now!


Spotlight: Oberlin Heritage Center, Ohio

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
VIsitor Services Representative

Oberlin Heritage Center

Oberlin is located in Lorain County, in northern Ohio. The Oberlin Heritage Center’s mission is “to preserve and share Oberlin’s unique heritage and to make our community a better place to live, learn, work, and visit.” It has made a number of resources available on its website. Click on the Research and Learn tab to open a new page with links to resource selections.

 

City Directories
The Oberlin city directories database includes directories from 1873 through 1916. According to the website, the 1916 directory is only partially entered. The directories contain listings of residents, businesses, and home addresses. They provide a description of the types of information included in the directories year by year to assist the database user. Click on the Online City Directory Database link to open the log in page. Choose the ‘citydirectory’ link. First click on the “Guest Account” button and then on the “Login” button to access the database; do not log in with a user name and password. There is also a link to Tips for Using the Databases, which you should read before beginning your search. The data fields include year, current address, address before 1894, address after 1894, head of household, head of household’s occupation and workplace, other resident listings, business name, business location and notes.

 

Historic Photographs
The Oberlin Heritage Center has an online database of over 500 images dating from the 1860s to 2001. This represents only part of the collection of more than 1000 records, including daguerreotypes, cartes de visite, tin types, glass slides, original prints, copies and digital images. Their focus is primarily on Oberlin’s people, buildings, businesses, schools, events and celebrations from 1833 to the present. Click on the “Our Common Center” Online Collection link to open the database log in page. First click on the “Guest Account” button and then on the “Login” button to access the database; do not log in with a user name and password. The Tips for Using the Databases are the same for all of the databases. You can browse or search the collection. Click on the question mark for online help with using the collection.

 

Westwood Cemetery
Westwood Cemetery is Oberlin’s only cemetery. It was dedicated on July 16, 1864. The cemetery is owned and operated by the City of Oberlin and contains nearly 9,000 burials. The Oberlin Heritage Center has made the following resources related to Westwood Cemetery available:

Click on the Westwood Gravestone Inventory Database link and then the “Westwood Test Version” link to access the database, which contains marker images and genealogical information for over 5,000 individuals. The database is a work in progress. It contains records for individuals interred prior to 2005. First click on the “Guest Account” button and then on the “Login” button to access the database. (It Is not necessary to have a user name and password to search the database and view results.) On the database main page you will find help and instructions on how to use the database, quick search, advanced search, and browse options. There are also links to a section map for the cemetery; a one-page cemetery guide, which points out “highlights” of the cemetery, including the markers for twenty-four of Oberlin’s notable historic residents; and a 64-page Guide to Westwood Cemetery.


New England Historic Genealogical Society
99 - 101 Newbury Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02116, USA
888-296-3447

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