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Last U.S. World War I Veteran Dies

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

The end of an era. Frank Buckles, the last surviving U.S. veteran of World War I passed away Sunday at 110. Buckles "died peacefully in his home of natural causes" early Sunday morning, the family said in a statement sent to CNN late Sunday by spokesman David DeJonge. You can read more about the last man standing of the famed Doughboys on CNN.

Research Recommendations: The Thorn

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

One of the most abused of all letters (and former letters) in the English language is the Thorn. In Latin, the letter was written as Þ (capital) or þ (lowercase). In English, however, the thorn looks like the modern letter “y.” The thorn is no longer used in everyday English. The Thorn was pronounced the same way as the digraph “th” in modern English. In proper usage it is NEVER pronounced as the letter “y.”

 

One of the most common uses was “ye,” pronounced as “the.” One can often see signs around America that use the modifier “Ye Olde,” which the average person pronounces it as “yee.” As the Oxford English Dictionary states, it was never pronounced in such a fashion.

Now you know the proper pronunciation, and can use it to show off one of the many benefits of being a genealogical researcher to your less-enlightened friends.


Registration Opens for NGS 2011

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Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Registration opened this week for the 2011 National Genealogical Society Family History Conference, which will be held May 11–14 in Charleston, South Carolina. The conference will be held at the North Charleston Convention Center, located near the Charleston International Airport. NEHGS will once again be participating in the conference. President and CEO D. Brenton Simons will be presenting, as will staff members Henry B. Hoff, David Allen Lambert, Michael J. Leclerc, and D. Joshua Taylor. We will also be in the exhibit hall with the latest books from the Society, website demonstrations, and answers to your genealogical questions.

For more information about the conference, visit www.ngsgenealogy.org.


100 Years Later, the Roll of the Dead in a Factory Fire is Complete

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

In the Cemetery of the Evergreens on the border of Brooklyn and Queens, there is a haunting stone monument to the garment workers who died in the Triangle Waist Company factory fire of 1911 but were never identified. Thanks to the work of genealogist Michael Hirsch, these six unidentified victims of the tragic New York City fire have been identified. Read Michael's story in the New York Times.

Name Origins: Annis

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

 ANNIS (f) - A medieval (both English and Scottish) form of AGNES much used by some colonial families. Often misread as ‘Annie,’ a diminutive not used as a formal name much before the nineteenth century.

This Week's Survey: Multiple Lines of Descent

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about readers’ research interests in the Mid-Atlantic states. Perhaps unsurprisingly, New York scored the highest, with 75% of respondents having interests there. The District of Columbia came in last, with 8% showing interest there. Full results are:

 

  • New York, 75%
  • Pennsylvania, 57%
  • New Jersey, 45%
  • Virginia, 40%
  • Maryland, 30%
  • West Virginia, 18%
  • Delaware, 12%
  • No Mid-Atlantic interests, 11%
  • District of Columbia, 8%

 

This week’s survey asks about the degree of pedigree collapse in your ancestry. Take the survey now!


The British Record Society and Origins.net

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Origins.net, an extremely helpful resource for U.K.I. research, has just made a major addition to the resources for British Origins. Probate records published by the British Records Society are now being added to the site.

 

The British Record Society was founded in 1889 to take over the Index Library. The Index Library started in 1888 as a private venture to publish indexes to British records. In 1892 an official series of lists and indexes to materials in the Public Record Office began publication, and the BRS turned to records in other repositories.

Slightly more than half of the first fifty volumes were indexes to wills and administrations. From the 1930s to the 1990s the BRS focused almost exclusively on probate materials. Now that almost all pre-1700 probate record indexes have been published, the focus has turned to a two-prong approach. Post-1700 probate records will be indexed. In addition, the BRS is collaborating with the University of Roehampton to produce a series of transcriptions of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Hearth Tax returns.

 

Origins.net has obtained the exclusive rights to publish these indexes online. Records in nineteen counties, as well as the Prerogative Court of Canterbury (PCC), are currently available. While the PCC wills are available online through The National Archives, the administrations are not currently accessible. This makes the BRS indexes for PCC records very valuable.

 

Those researching their early British ancestors will find a great deal of information on Origins.net. The addition of these indexes makes the site even more indispensible.


This Week's Survey: Mid-Atlantic States

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about researching adoptive ancestors. 56% of respondents research both birth and adoptive lines. 2.6% research only the adoptive line. Complete results are:

  • 57%, I research both birth and adoptive lines.
  • 33%, I research only the birth lines.
  • 7%, I research neither, but stop at the adoptee.
  • 3%, I research only the adoptive lines. 

This week’s survey asks about which Mid-Atlantic states, if any, hold genealogical interest for you. Take the survey now!


A'Lelia Bundles: Family History

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

A'Lelia Bundles grew up knowing that the women in her family were special, but it wasn't until she was in college though, that she realized just how much her grandmothers contributed to the world. Read the full story of this African-American family.

Name Origins: Omar

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

 OMAR (m): Omar ibn al-Khattab, second Caliph of Baghdad, succeeded Abu-Bekr in 634 A.D. but was murdered in 644 A.D. by Firoz, a Persian slave. Omar’s daughter Hafsah was third wife of the Prophet Mohammed.

Research Recommendations: Ohio Memory Project

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Nearly 50,000 new items were made available when the Ohio Memory Project launched a new website. Ohio Memory is a collaborative project of the Ohio Historical Society and the State Library of Ohio. The project’s mission is “to provide access to historical treasures of Ohio, bringing together primary sources from all parts of the state.” The focus is on information that celebrates state and local history; encourages cooperation between archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other cultural organizations; and allows the global community to discover and explore Ohio’s rich past.

 

You can browse the collections by subject, place, or contributor. You can also search by keywords, exact phrases, or individual words. Browsing under the word actress revealed photographs of Ethel Barrymore as well as the Gish sisters. Marching Bands brought images of musicians from the 1920s to The Ohio State University in the 1960s.

 

If you have Ohio ancestry, this is a great website for adding social context and history to their lives. You can find out more at www.ohiomemory.org.


Spotlight: Library Databases: Ohio and Minnesota

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Dayton Metro Library, Ohio

 

The city of Dayton, seat for Montgomery County, is in located southwestern Ohio. The Dayton Metro Library has made two newspaper indexes available on its website. Click on the Research & Databases link in the site’s contents list to access the library’s online resources.

 

Dayton Newspaper Index
This database indexes newspaper articles of significance to local Dayton area. The newspapers indexed here include the Dayton Daily News, Dayton Journal Herald, Dayton City Paper, Dayton Magazine, Downtowner, and Impact Weekly for the period from 1985 through 2003. This database is an index only, with basic information about the story listed and where it can be found in the newspaper. Full-text articles are not available online. You may contact the library by phone or email to learn more information on obtaining a copy of an article.

 

The search fields include keyword, article title, newspaper title, and date published (month, day, year). The search results are returned in order by date, but you can change the sort order by using the drop-down box at the end of the form. The data fields in the search results are article title, newspaper title, date, and citation.

 

Dayton Obituary Index
This databases indexes obituaries and death notices appearing in Dayton newspapers for the periods between 1850 and 1890, 1920 and 1931, and from 1985 through the present. Currently, this index only includes records from the Dayton Daily Journal. Full-text articles are not available online. You may contact the library by phone or email to learn more about how to get a copy of an article you find.

 

The search fields include keyword, last name, first name, newspaper title, date published (month, day, year), and newspaper citation (volume, issue, page, column). The search results are returned in order by date, but you can change the sort order by using the drop-down bo']x at the end of the form. The data fields in the search results are name of the deceased, newspaper title, date, citation, and note. Information in the Note field includes, but is not limited to, family relationships, date died, age when died, cause of death, and information about services for the deceased.

 

Duluth Public Library, Minnesota

 

The city of Duluth, located in northeastern Minnesota, is the seat of St. Louis County. The Duluth Public Library has made two indexes available on its website. Click on the Electronic Resources link in the site’s contents list to access the library’s online resources and scroll down to the Genealogy section.

 

Obituary Index
This database indexes obituaries printed in the Duluth News-Tribune and Duluth Herald for the period from 1962 to the present. The search boxes include name search, city search, and year and month of death. You also have the option to determine the number of records returned, between 500 and 1,000, and how they are sorted, by name or city. Copies of obituaries may be ordered from the library. They may be requested by mail or by using the online form provided.

 

Duluth-Area War Casualties and POWs — World War II and Korean War
This database contains information on military personnel from the Duluth area who were killed or captured during World War II and the Korean War. As noted on the website, the database is incomplete and is a work in progress. The data fields in the search results include name, address, rank, service branch, date of incident (killed, captured, etc.), and a brief description of what happened. Each record has at least one citation to an article about the individual that appeared in the Duluth News Tribune or the Duluth Herald. The records are full text searchable. The search fields are keyword(s), rank, branch of service, or date range. You also have the option to determine the number of records returned, between 10 and 50. You must enter text in the keyword field (name, citation, town). There are instructions on how to enter information in the search field. Copies of article may be ordered from the library.


This Week’s Survey: Adoption

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about family health history information. 38% of respondents have gathered information, but have not yet compiled the data. 6% have gathered no data, but plan to do so in the future. The full results are:

    

 38%, I have gathered information on family health issues, but have not yet compiled the data.

    

 25%, I have compiled a family health history and shared it with my health care provider.

    

 24%, I do not plan to compile a family health history at this time.

    

 7%, I have compiled a family health history but have not yet shared it with my health care provider.

    

 6%, I have have gathered no data for a family health history, but plan to do one.

    

    

This week’s survey asks how you handle researching the lines of adopted individuals. Take the survey now!


Genealogical Writing: Serial Commas

(Research Recommendations) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Commas are one of the most abused punctuation marks. One of the more confusing is the serial comma. Also known as a series comma or the Oxford comma, a serial comma is used before the conjunction that joins the last two elements in a series. For example:

 

Chris, Michael, and Henry gave many consultations at the last education program.
My great-grandfather’s main crops were barley, peas, and turnips.

 

When the elements in the series have internal punctuation, it is usually easier to separate the elements with a semi-colon instead of a comma:

 

Their children were Steven, b. 1862; Jonathan, b. 1864; Mary, b. 1866; and Louisa, b. 1868.

 

For more information on the proper use of serial commas, see the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition.


The Weekly Genealogist Newsletter Update

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Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

To solve a technical glitch, we have asked all subscribers to The Weekly Genealogist electronic newsletter, including all current members, to confirm their subscription. If you received an email from us on Friday, please click on the Confirm Subscription link. If you did not receive, or have lost your email, you can resubscribe here.

Name Origins: Mally

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

 MALLY (f): Scottish/Northern English nickname for MARY. Mally (Graham) Coatsworth was an ancestor of the American writer and Newberry Award winner Elizabeth Jane Coatsworth of Nobleboro, Maine.

This Week's Survey: Family Health Histories

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Michael J. Leclerc

Michael J. Leclerc
Director of Special Projects

Last week’s survey asked about participation in national institutes. These institutes provide opportunities for intensive and advanced week-long study in a focused area of genealogical research. 93% of respondents have not had the opportunity to attend one of these institutes. 4% have attended the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogical Research (SLIG) held in Salt Lake City. The National Institute on Genealogical Research (NIGR) in Washington, D.C., and the Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research (IGHR) held at Samford University, tied with 2.5% each.

 

This week’s survey asks about family health histories. Take the survey now!


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