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The Daily Genealogist: Cemetery of Bethlehem Steltz Reformed Church, Pennsylvania

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Cemetery of Bethlehem Steltz Reformed Church, Pennsylvania

The Bethlehem Steltz Reformed Church, which was founded in 1794, is located in Glen Rock, Pennsylvania. Glen Rock is a borough in York County on the state’s southern border with Maryland. Click on the Our Heritage link to learn about the church’s history. The church’s cemetery index available online. It is a Microsoft Excel document, which must be downloaded to your computer to be read. There are nearly 2,400 records in the file. It should be noted that the database is sorted by section/plot number and includes reserved plots and those still for sale. Click on the Cemetery Information link to download the file. The data fields in the database are last name, first name, middle name, date of birth, date of death, section/plot, receipts/deed/perpetual care/transferred, death certificate, and notes. A separate listing of burials in the Old Cemetery follows the listing of burials in the newer cemetery. The earliest dated burial in the Old Cemetery took place in 1801. The last burial was in 1956.


The Daily Genealogist: A Wintersnight Tale and A Christmas Eve Family Story

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Last week I wrote about John S. Goodwin’s two pamphlets, Christmas Questions and Christmas Answers, which were published in 1892 and 1893. I admired Goodwin’s creative appeal for genealogical information, and thought his questions and methods contained good advice for today’s researchers.

This week I’m focusing on two slim volumes in the NEHGS Library that may serve as models, even today, for how family history can be shared during the holiday season, and then preserved. Both books were written and privately published by Charles Henry Dalton (1826–1908), a native of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, who lived most of his life in Boston. According to the BOSarchitecture website, “Dalton was a merchant and businessman. During his career, he served in a variety of positions, including as president of several railroads, president of the Consolidated Coal Company, treasurer of the Manchester Print Works, and treasurer of the Merrimack Manufacturing Company. He also was the first treasurer of MIT, serving from 1865 to 1867, and was president of Massachusetts General Hospital for many years.”

The first book, A Wintersnight Tale, published in 1904, opens with the words “Told on Christmas Evening, 1903” and follows with a list of the names of seventeen people — including ten Daltons — who had spent the holiday together. Charles Dalton and his wife, Mary (McGregor), had no children so the Daltons listed were probably the children and grandchildren of his brothers. What follows is twenty-two pages of history, genealogy, and especially reminiscences about the family of his mother, Julia (Spaulding) Dalton, whose roots in Chelmsford dated to at least the mid-1600s. Dalton wrote about the Chelmsford homestead where he was born and which had been in the family for 160 years. After his family moved from Chelmsford when he was a child, he returned to spend summers there, and in his story confided, “It seemed to me the pleasantest of all possible places. I liked it better than going to school.” He described the rhythms of life on the farm, and changes that had taken place during his lifetime, especially in transportation.

He closed with the following words: “You young folks will doubtless live to see even greater changes, such as, for example, flying machines, to which I do not doubt you will contribute your full share. [The flight at Kitty Hawk had just occurred on December 17, 1903.] And I trust you will take your revenge on somebody by telling your stories, as a recompense for what you have so politely endured listening to mine.”

Charles Dalton must have been pleased at the reception of his reminiscences, because the following year he published another volume, titled, A Christmas Eve Family Story. Sixteen people were in attendance for Christmas Eve 1904. That year’s reminiscences were about Dalton’s paternal ancestors, back to his great-grandfather, “Captain James Dalton, mariner and merchant of Boston,” who was born in 1718.

Both of these books were handsomely printed on nice paper with attractive marbled covers. Fifty copies of A Christmas Eve Family Story were ordered, and the same number may well have been purchased of A Wintersnight Tale. The books were likely to have been fairly costly to produce. The easy and inexpensive options for creating and disseminating books that exist today were still about one hundred years in the future.

Charles Dalton clearly felt it was important to document and preserve his recollections of his early life, his memories of his parents and grandparents, and his knowledge of his family history. He might well have simply regaled the company with his stories on those Christmas Eves and done nothing further. But he went that extra vital step and, by publishing his stories, enabled them to live on, long after those present were no longer living. Over a century later, Charles Dalton provides us with a model for leaving a genealogical legacy.

 


The Daily Genealogist: Battlefield Tours: Readers' Tips and Recommendations

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Battlefield Tours: Readers’ Tips and Recommendations
Readers of the London newspaper, The Telegraph, share their advice on touring First World War battlefields in Europe.

The Daily Genealogist: First Girl in a Century for Carmarthenshire Family

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

First Girl in a Century for Carmarthenshire Family
“A family in south-west Wales are celebrating the birth of the first baby girl in their family for 103 years.”


The Daily Genealogist: Census to Offer Internet Option in Gov't Surveys

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Census to Offer Internet Option in Gov’t Surveys
“The new Internet option is part of a larger census effort toward a digital transformation,” said Frank Vitrano, the Census Bureau’s associate director for the 2020 census. “We see a real possibility of saving money and improving data quality, setting the stage for the 2020 census.”

The Daily Genealogist: Family History Writing

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you were hoping for any genealogically-related presents this year. The results are:

  • 7%, Membership to a genealogical society
  • 11%, Subscription to a genealogical website
  • 7%, Genealogical education program or conference
  • 10%, Other genealogical trip
  • 23%, Genealogical books
  • 5%, Genealogical research assistance from a professional
  • 11%, DNA testing
  • 14%, Other genealogical present.
  • 51%, I do not have any genealogy-related items on my wish list.

This week’s survey asks if about the ways in which you have made your family history available. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: “Christmas Questions” and “Christmas Answers”

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

In the NEHGS online library catalog, I came across a pamphlet with a title that piqued my curiosity: Christmas Questions for the Goodwins of Virginia; Christmas Answers for the Goodwins of Virginia. After locating the pamphlet in the library’s vertical file, I found that it consists of two four-page sections published in 1892 and 1893 by John S. Goodwin (b. 1858). 

One hundred and twenty years ago, Goodwin attempted to use the holiday season to make progress on his stalled Goodwin research. The first part, Christmas Questions, opens with these words, “'We cannot help having ancestors,’ and there is no better time to talk about them and their lives than when we are gathered together in family groups during the festivities.” Goodwin then tries to establish the importance of the Goodwins of Virginia — a group “proud of probably the longest line of American ancestry of which any family can boast — and dismisses the Massachusetts, Maine, and Connecticut Goodwins as late arrivals. (He notes that Goodwins were already in Virginia “when the timbers of the famous Mayflower were still growing in their native forests.”)

Then, Goodwin made his appeal: “As a Christmas greeting this suggestion is sent to you. The writer is a busy Chicago Lawyer not at all imaginative enough to create a line of descent or to manufacture facts. You are in the old homes, have the old Bibles, church and churchyard records and the records of your county seats and as you meet and talk the old traditions come to mind, together with ‘many a quaint and curious legend of forgotten lore.’ Write down these traditions; send me your own family data; send copies of your Bible records; look through the county seat records and send everything pertaining to the early Goodwins and the writer will so arrange and collate the matter sent as to put our lineage beyond danger of loss. Many have already responded but all can do more.” Next, Goodwin detailed what he knew of Bartholomew Goodwin, the immigrant to Virginia, who he thought probably arrived between 1600 and 1625, and presented his research questions.

In 1893, in Christmas Answers, Goodwin reported a good deal of success. “Just one year ago the ‘Christmas Questions’ were sent out and so prompt and full have been the replies that their mission is virtually accomplished, only three groups still being unconnected with the immigrant ancestor.” (Sadly, though, he admitted that “[my] own branch is still unidentified and I will gratefully appreciate any assistance which can be rendered me on that question.”) Goodwin then described the research breakthroughs and included a two-page table of descent. The fourth and final page of the pamphlet advertised that the author’s book, The Goodwin Families in America, was in preparation and posed a few more questions.

I enjoyed Christmas Questions and Christmas Answers. I appreciated John S. Goodwin’s goals, his willingness to cast a wide net to find answers to his genealogical problems, and his creative plea to his fellow Goodwins. Although 120 years have passed, I think his appeal continues to have a lot of resonance. Goodwin’s requests to his readers — to search home and local sources, ask questions of relatives, write down what you know, and share and preserve your data — still provide a good blueprint for genealogists.       


The Daily Genealogist: Christmas 1940

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Christmas 1940
This BBC website examines how Christmas was celebrated in England in 1940. The site includes historic audio and video footage and related links.

The Daily Genealogist: Genealogically-Related Presents

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked whether you save holiday cards sent by previous generations of your family. 2,956 people answered this survey. The results are:

  • 6%, Yes, I have family holiday cards from the nineteenth century.
  • 22%, Yes, I have family holiday cards from 1900 to 1950.
  • 31%, Yes, I have family holiday cards from 1951 to 1975.
  • 37%, Yes, I have family holiday cards from 1976 to 2000.
  • 38%, Yes, I have family holiday cards from 2001 to the present.
  • 40%, No, I do not save family holiday cards. 

This week’s survey asks whether you are hoping for any genealogically-related presents this year. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Clarissa

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

CLARISSA/CLARISSA HARLOWE (f): The innocent heroine of Samuel Richardson’s great novel of that name (1748/9). The name was often mutilated to “Clary” or “Claricy” in England and rural America. (See George R. Stewart, American Given Names: Their Origin and History in the Context of the English Language, 1979.) Clarissa Harlowe Barton (1820–1907) is better known as Clara Barton, “Angel of the Battlefield” during the Civil War and founder of the American Red Cross. See (Barton, NEHGR 84 (1930): 400–421; NEXUS 7(1990):208-13). Clarissa H. Partridge (b. 1822), daughter of Amos and Clarissa (Hill) (Slocom) Partridge of Bellingham, Mass., probably was named for her mother rather than Richardson’s heroine. Clarissa Harlowe Kellogg (prob. b. Galway, N.Y., 12 June 1799–prob. d. LeRoy, N.Y., 9 June 1873), was the daughter of Ezra and Abigail (Olmstead) Kellogg and the wife of Samuel Dauchy (Timothy Hopkins, The Kelloggs in the Old World and the New [San Francisco, 1903], 1:268, 600; with many thanks to Jerome E. Anderson)

The Daily Genealogist: The Cambridge Room, Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

The Cambridge Room, Cambridge Public Library, Massachusetts

The City of Cambridge is located in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The Cambridge Public Library has made some resources available through The Cambridge Room website. Click on the Online Resources link to access them.

Historic Cambridge Newspapers
The Cambridge Public Library has made available on its website all of the historic newspapers in its collection that are not copyright restricted. The digitization of historic Cambridge newspapers is a project of the Cambridge Public Library Archives and Special Collections. The newspapers are full-text searchable and available to all researchers for free. The database can also be browsed by title or by date. The newspapers in the database are as follows: Cambridge Chronicle (1846–1923), the Cambridge Press (1887–1889), the Cambridge Sentinel (1903–1912), and the Cambridge Tribune (1887–1923). More than 6,300 issues have been digitized.

Click on the Cambridge Historic Newspapers link to open the search page. Click on the Search link in the menu bar at the top of the page. Enter a keyword or keywords in the search box. This will open a new page with search results. At this point the search can be refined by publication, category, decade, and word count. With Advanced Search researchers can limit a search to a specific date range and/or a specific publication. Searches can be full text or headlines only. Click on the article title link to view a digitized image of the newspaper page, with the article highlighted. To the left of the image you will find a transcription of the article with your keyword(s) highlighted.

Cambridge Buildings and Architects
Another resource available through the library’s website is the Cambridge Buildings and Architects database. Christopher Hail created the database during his time as a librarian at Harvard's Graduate School of Design. As noted in the introduction the “focus of the list is the history of the design of Cambridge buildings.” This database may also prove useful to family history researchers with an interest in the buildings in which their ancestors lived.

Cambridge buildings are listed by street. Entries are listed by the style of the building, when it was built, and by whom. You can view the database street by street by clicking on the first letter of the street name in the alphabetical list at the top of the page. There is also a list of Harvard University buildings outside of Cambridge, an index of personal names of the architects and names of buildings, and an index of street names. It is noted in the introduction to the index of street names that references for discontinued street names can be found in the alphabetical street files. “(F)or example: "Fourth street: see Sciarappa street" follows Fountain Terrace in the Streets - F file.” For some properties high-quality color images are available for downloading. Click on the List of Images link to access them. Consult the User’s Guide to learn more about the database and how it functions.


The Daily Genealogist: Early Shaker Christmases

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

A Note from the Editor: Early Shaker Christmases

The United Society of Believers was founded in Manchester, England, in 1747. Their nickname, Shakers, was a shortened version of the derisive term “Shaking Quakers,” which was bestowed because of the group’s vigorous movement during worship. Their leader, Mother Ann Lee, and eight followers established themselves in New York State in 1774. According to the Hancock Shaker Village website, the group was “seeking the freedom to live, work, and worship according to their main religious tenets: celibacy, communal life, and confession of sin. The Shakers also believed in racial and gender equality, simplicity, and pacifism. They dedicated their lives to creating a working Heaven on Earth amidst the boundless opportunities presented by settlement of the New World.” Eventually, the Shakers founded eighteen communities in ten states, and in the decade prior to the Civil War, the Shakers reached their numerical height with approximately 5,000 believers.

I have long enjoyed learning about Shaker history and culture. For a portion of my childhood, I lived less than two miles from the Hancock Shaker Village in Hancock, Massachusetts, and I have visited the fine museum there a number of times. I’ve toured the Canterbury Shaker Village in Canterbury, New Hampshire, and the Enfield Shaker Museum in Enfield, N.H. I've also visited the museum at Sabbathday Lake in New Gloucester, Maine, which is home to the only remaining active Shaker community. (Eight primary Shaker sites in the United States are open to the public.) 

I receive The United Society of Shakers Newsletter by email, and I was intrigued by what I learned about how early Shakers observed Christmas in the November-December 2012 issue. Below is an excerpt: 

[Y]ou might find it interesting to step back in Shaker history and learn how differently Christmas was marked by earlier Shakers. Not until 1876 did the Shakers here in Maine celebrate Christmas with a decorated tree and gifts and Christmas carols. What were those earlier years like for the Shakers? Daniel W. Patterson, the pre-eminent scholar of Shaker music, writes in his major work, The Shaker Spiritual, “In the earliest years, Believers (Shakers) were agreed that Christmas was not to be kept ‘after the manner of the world,’ but ‘had a labor’ to know whether to observe the day at all, and whether to reckon it by the old- or new-style calendar. Mother Ann (the founder of the Shaker church), left others to discover the proper order. One good Believer, Hannah Hocknell, did not ‘feel satisfied’ as to the ‘propriety’ of observing the day, so she rose on Christmas morning intending to set about her business. As she dressed, ‘some unaccountable operation’ repeatedly prevented her from putting on her shoes. Mother Ann then pointed out that this was ‘the most prominent sign recorded in the scripture of holy and sacred ground and purposes.’ As Hannah had intended to wash clothes and clean up the house, the sign meant that the ‘spiritual house ought first to be cleansed in a special manner’ on Christmas.

Father Joseph (Meacham, Mother Ann's American successor) built on this teaching in the 1790s, when he set Christmas as a ‘central time’ for ‘confessing and putting away sins, and all wrongs from the camps of the Saints, and cleansing the spiritual house.’ His ordinance had the implication, later specifically stated in the Millennial Laws of 1845, that ‘on Christmas day Believers should make perfect reconciliation, one with an other; and leave all grudges, hard feelings, and disaffections, one towards an other . . . and to forgive, as we would be forgiven; and nothing which is this day settled, or which has been settled previous to this, may hereafter be brought forward against an other.’

Christmas was for the Shakers therefore for almost 100 years a Fast Day. Maybe the traditions of those early Shakers and more specifically the words that framed those traditions can be useful today.”

For those interested in learning more about the Shakers, you can view the websites hyperlinked in the second paragraph or peruse several Shaker-related articles featured in the holiday 2006 issue of New England Ancestors


The Daily Genealogist: Take Time to Produce Well-Sourced, Quality Work

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Take Time to Produce Well-Sourced, Quality Work
Genealogical columnist Betty Malesky comments on standards for genealogical research, currently a “controversy in the world of online genealogical bloggers.”

The Daily Genealogist: London Blitz: Bomb Sight Interactive Map Created

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

London Blitz: Bomb Sight Interactive Map Created
“Bomb Sight” was created by a group from the University of Portsmouth using data from Britain’s National Archives. The Blitz, which lasted from September 7, 1940, until May 11, 1941, resulted in more than 20,000 deaths and 1.4 million people left homeless.

The Daily Genealogist: Saving Holiday Cards

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked what you consider to be your genealogical skill level. 3,541 people answered this survey. The results are:

  • 3%, Beginner
  • 50%, Intermediate
  • 40%, Advanced
  • 4%, Professional
  • 2%, I’m not sure.

This week’s survey asks if you save holiday cards sent by previous generations of your family. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Mephibosheth

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

MEPHIBOSHETH (m): Hebrew. “And Jonathan, Saul’s son, had a son that was lame of his feet. He was five years old when the tidings came of Saul and Jonathan out of Jezreel, and his nurse took him up, and fled: and it came to pass, as she made haste to flee, that he fell, and became lame. And his name was MEPHIBOSHETH” (2 Samuel 4:4). Mephibosheth Sanborn, b. 5, 9 mo. 1663, was the son of William and Mary (Moulton) Sanborn (Hampton VRs, 1:96, 552). Rev. Mephibosheth Cain performed marriages at Dresden, Maine, in the late 1790s. Were these men born lame, or was this a name randomly chosen from the Bible?

The Daily Genealogist: Funeral Home Records — Tennessee and Pennsylvania

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Alexander Funeral Home Records, Tennessee

The Alexander Funeral Home was established in Gallatin, Tennessee, in 1921, and later opened several branches in the surrounding area. The business is still in existence and, having merged with another institution, operates as the Alexander-Newby Funeral Home. The city of Gallatin is located in Sumner County in the north central part of the state.

The records in this database are from two of the funeral home’s locations. The records from the Alexander Funeral Home in Gallatin cover the period from 1928 through 1968. The records from the Alexander Westmoreland Funeral Home in Westmoreland cover the period from 1958 through 1991. The records have been indexed by year. Select the Click Here to View the Individual Funeral Home Records Indexed by Years link to open a page with date range links. Click on the desired date range to open a new page with a chronological listing of records for that period. The data fields may include some or all of the following: full name, place of death, color/sex, marital status, date of birth, birthplace, date of death, age, occupation, name of father, birthplace of father, maiden name of mother, birthplace of mother, physician, cause of death, date, time, place of service, name of cemetery, clergyman, pall bearers, near relatives, and informant’s name and address.

The records of additional Tennessee funeral homes, including the Newby Funeral Home, the Wilkinson and Wiseman Funeral Home, and Cole and Garrett Funeral Home, can be searched by entering a surname in the search box on the left side of the page.

Bastian-Maneval Funeral Home Records, Pennsylvania

This funeral home records database is found on the Tri-Counties Genealogy and History website, which was founded in 1996 to create a local history library for three counties located on the New York-Pennsylvania border. They are Bradford and Tioga Counties in Pennsylvania and Chemung County in New York.

The Bastian-Maneval Funeral Home is actually located in Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, but, according to the website, there are many individuals in the records who have ties to Bradford and Tioga Counties. The records in the alphabetical databases cover the years 1933 through 1936 and 1948 to 1954. Click on a letter and scroll down to view a list of names of individuals with surnames beginning with that letter. Continue to scroll down the page to view the detailed records for each individual. The data fields in the detailed record are name, residence, spouse, occupation, employer and address, date of death, date of birth, date of funeral, services at, clergyman, religion of deceased, birthplace, place of death, cause of death, contributory cause, certifying physician, name of father, his birthplace, name of mother, her birthplace, cemetery, funeral cost, and newspaper article (obituary).


The Daily Genealogist: New Irish Resources

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Researchers tracing Irish ancestors will be pleased to note that new Irish resources have recently been made available online

National Archives of Ireland Website

In November, the National Archives of Ireland launched a new genealogy website, which offers access to Census Records for 1901 and 1911, Soldiers’ Wills from 1914 to 1917, and Tithe Applotment Books (head-of-household substitutes) from 1823 to 1837. (FamilySearch has Tithe Applotment Books from 1814 through 1855.) In years to come, the Archives plans to add the following collections: Calendars of Wills and Administrations, 1858–1922; nineteenth-century census survivals, 1821–51; Valuation Office House and Field Books, 1848–60; and census search forms for the 1841 and 1851 censuses.

Irish Military Records

The Military Archives is responsible for the records of Ireland’s Department of Defence, the Defence Forces, and the Army Pensions Board. The website features the Military Archives Image Identification Project and the Irish Army Census Collection, 1922 (which is in its third and final phase). (An Irish Times article provides background information on the 1922 census.) According to the website, “the Military Archives holds only the personnel records of those who served in the military of the Irish Free State from 1922, as well as material pertaining to the Irish Volunteers and the Independence movement, 1913–1921.”

British Army records, including those for Irish regiments, can be obtained at the National Archives of England. An article entitled “Information Document on the Irish Regiments of the British Army up to 31st July 1922” can be a useful guide. Other sources of military records in Ireland are “The National Library, which holds a number of lists of Irish Personnel in the British Army from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, or Dublin City Library and Archive . . . which is the point of contact for the Royal Dublin Fusiliers Association." 


The Daily Genealogist: B.C. Historical Records Available Online — for Free

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

B.C. Historical Records Available Online — for Free
Original records from British Columbia have been “scanned, indexed and [are] now available from anywhere in the world for printing — free of charge — through the Royal BC Museum/BC Archives website."

The Daily Genealogist: Old South Church Votes to Sell Rare Psalm Book from the 1600s and Silver

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Old South Church Votes to Sell Rare Psalm Book from the 1600s and Silver
The Bay Psalm Book “printed in Cambridge in 1640, was the first book published in British North America and quickly became the standard psalter used on Sunday mornings throughout the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Eleven copies of it have survived, and all are now owned by major institutions. No copy has been on the market since 1947.”

The Daily Genealogist: Long Live the Art of Penmanship

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Our View: Long Live the Art of Penmanship
An editorial in the Herald News of Fall River, Massachusetts, argues for the continued teaching of cursive handwriting in schools.

The Daily Genealogist: Brown Team Cracks Code Used by Roger Williams in Book’s Margins

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Newly-deciphered marginal notes written by Roger Williams in a seventeenth-century book are being called “the most significant addition to Williams scholarship in a generation or more.”

The Daily Genealogist: Genealogical Skill Level

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether family history was part of your Thanksgiving. 2,904 people answered this survey. The results are:

  • 31%, Yes, we did or discussed genealogical research.
  • 4%, Yes, we discussed DNA findings.
  • 44%, Yes, we shared family stories.
  • 15%, Yes, we shared family photos or home movies.
  • 39%, Yes, we shared family recipes and/or ate foods made from traditional family recipes.
  • 37%, No, family history was not part of my Thanksgiving this year.

This week’s survey asks how you would characterize your genealogical skill level. Take the survey now!


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