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A search for a London Oilman in 1717,

(Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: While reviewing some church records for my ancestor in London I found his occupation.  In 1717 in the burial register he is listed as an "oilman".  I think of the oil man who brings home heating oil, however I feel this was much different then.

 

Answer: An Oil man in 1717 London would have sold the oil used for lamps.  He may have also been involved in the sales of oil lamps.  I would examine a probate for him and see the contents of his personal estate.


Searching 18th century New Hampshire newspapers.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I heard from a genealogist that NEHGS has placed a New Hampshire vital records from a newspaper online.  Can you tell me what this might be to cover the 18th century?

 

Answer:  I would start with the the New Hampshire Gazette 1756-1800, as well as the Early American Newspapers series we offer as a premium database.  The New Hampshire Gazette can be searched directly on our website at: http://web1.americanancestors.org/Search.aspx?Ca=98&Da=297   To reach the Early American Newspapers (Series 1) to search early New Hampshire papers and others go to: http://web1.americanancestors.org/external-databases/


A share in a Shoddy Mill in 1879.

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I have a curious item listed in the Massachusetts Probate of an ancestor in 1879.  I am not sure what a 1/2 share in a Shoddy Mill would be.  Can you tell me what that would be as he was a farmer.

 

Answer:  A Shoddy Mill in the 19th and early 20th century produced fabric from the left over wool-processing byproduct.  The leftover product of wool would often be used for military uniforms, or blankets.


Maps and Plans of Massachusetts in 1831.

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I found a reference to a series of maps from 1831.  I understand that the Commonwealth had required that all communities had a map drawn, representing the homes and land owners.  Does NEHGS have these maps, if not where can I find them.

 

Answer: The Maps and Plans collection from 1794 and 1830-31 are one of the most valuable collections at the Massachusetts State Archives.  For the first time most communities are detailed with the locations of homes, churches, and factories.  This series is on microfilm at the Massachusetts State Archives at Columbia Point in Dorchester, Massachusetts.  You can find out more about the collection online at: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/arc/arccol/colidx.htm


The occupation of a wagon maker in 1840.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I have a question on an old occupation I have never heard of from 1840.  Can you tell me what the occupation of a "wainwright" was?

 

Answer: A wainwright was an early occupation for a maker or repairer of wagons. I have seen this occupation in city directories on occasion.


What does a WRC flag marker represent?

(Cemeteries, Military Records) Permanent link
 

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  While placing flags on veterans graves over Veterans Day weekend, I noticed some flag markers with WRC on them.  Not sure but I imagine there is some connection with the Civil War.

 

Answer: The W.R.C. stands for the Women's Relief Corps was the auxiliary to the G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic).  This organization made up of daughters, mothers, and spouses of Civil War veterans were very active in the late 19th century through the early 20th century.  An example of a typical flag marker can be seen online here: http://www.joycetice.com/flaghold/wrc001.jpg


In search of Lynn Street, Boston, Mass. from 1814.

(Boston, Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: A recent trip to NEHGS turned up the Boston, Suffolk Co. deed for my ancestor on Lynn Street in 1814.  I can not seem to locate this street, and it would be nice to know if it still exists.

 

Answer:  The current Lynn Street in Boston was named in 1884, and had been called Thacher Avenue before.  The historic Lynn Street of 1814 was laid out in Boston in the year 1708.  At that time it was located from the North Battery northwesterly to the ferryway by Hudson's point.  Together with portion of of Ann street named Commercial Street February  17, 1834.


In search of a grandfather born at a landmark in Salem in 1883.

(Massachusetts) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  When Emile Beaulieu (my grandfather) was alive he told me he was born at the "House of Seven Gables"  January  2,  1883 Salem Massachusetts. He was unnamed on Salem birth record.  His parents:  "Elzear and Georgiana (Charette) Beaulieu" both of Canada only spoke French.   I understand there was at one time a settlement house - His mother went into labor on her journey down from French Quebec Canada to Somerset Mass - they did not live in Salem - from my knowledge they only used the settlement residence during Emile's birth and continue to move on.

 

Answer:  I wonder if your grandfather was simply referring to the fact he was born in Salem.  Making a general reference to the landmark well connected to the city.  However there might be a link to the house.  I suggest you contact Hawthorne’s well known  House of the Seven Gables.  They are located at  115 Derby Street, Salem, MA 01970.  They can be reached by phone (978) 744-0991, or email: info@7gables.org.  Their official website is: http://www.7gables.org/contact.shtml  I look forward to hearing how you make out on your search.


Researching Nova Scotia Deeds from the late 18th century.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Will I be able to search deeds for Nova Scotia when I visit NEHGS.  I am looking for 1790's era deeds and Crown Land grant maps for Halifax County.

 

Answer:  We have deeds, probates and Crown Land maps for Halifax at NEHGS.  We also have all the other counties of Nova Scotia in case you need them.  If you have any specific question about our Microtext holdings.  Feel free to call them directly at 617-226-1239, or call me at 617-226-1222.


Understanding the Massachusetts Supreme Court timeline.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I am little confused as to the history of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court history.  What courts operated and when from the history of the SJC?  This will help me determine which records I should be looking for.

 

Answer:  The General Court of Massachusetts existed from 1629-1692.  This was replaced by the Superior Court of Judicature 1692-1780, this court is the Supreme Judical Court since 1780.  From the Supreme Court the Appeals Court was created in 1972.  Another court that was created from the General Court was the Court of Assistants that existed from 1629-1692.  This court was succeeded by the Governor and Council Court which existed from 1692 until 1780.


The job of an Artificer during the War of 1812.

(Military Records, War of 1812) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  In a War of 1812 muster roll for a New Jersery Regiment I noticed that there was someone called an "Artificer".  Can you help explain what he did?

 

Answer: An artificer was a mechanic who had knowledge to repair things.  He may have worked on a variety of tasks during the War of 1812.  If you can locate his pension file it may give some further detail of his military career. 


Replacing markers that are worn for Civil War veterans.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: At your lecture on the Civil War you discussed about replacing broken or illegible Civil War markers.  Can you discuss that with me a little, I am considering replacing one.

 

Answer:  If it is a gravestone marker from the U.S. Government it can be replaced if broken or worn.  My suggestion would be to get an upright granite, as marble tends to wear down.  Others would argue that marble looks more uniform with the period stones.  My honest opinion is the duration of the gravestones survival should be considered.  In my hometown I have seen at least 3 stones fixed, and I have had one relatives stone replaced in Cohasset, Mass. You will want to contact the caretaker or the office of the cemetery where the damaged stone is located.  Then contact the veterans agent within the city or town the cemetery is situated.  He or she can have the forms for you to fill out and the process can be underway.  Some cemeteries will install the veterans stone free of charge, others will charge an installation fee for setting the foundation.  Do keep in mind some cemeteries will only allow flat markers not upright.  If you have any questions please feel free to call me 617-226-1222.


The Shakers of Alfred, Maine

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Can you refer me to a good book on the Shakers of Alfred, Maine?

 

Answer:  At NEHGS we have a book by Harland H. Eastman, Alfred, Maine - The Shakers and The Village. (Sanford, ME., 1986).  This can be used to learn about the Shaker community which started in Alfred in 1793. The book is richly illustrated, and has maps of the settlement. The NEHGS Call # is BX/9768/A6/E3/1986.


Early church records from Trinity Church in New York City.

(Church Records, New York) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  My ancestor Ebenezer Haywood was a member of Trinity Church in New York City I have learned.  He was born in 1837 and I would like to know how to search for his baptism.

 

Answer: The baptisms, marriages, and burials for Trinity Church in New York City are conveniently online.  I located the entry in their database for your Ebenezer Haywood, botn 24 April 1837, and baptized 10 July 1842, the son of Alfred and Mary Haywood. You can use this database to search for more of your Haywoods.  The database has records as early as 1750.  Search online at: http://www.trinitywallstreet.org/files/history/registers/registry.php


Researching Odd Fellows from New Hampshire.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  My third great grandfather has a member of the Odd Fellows from New Hampshire.  Can you tell me where the records for members of the I.O.O.F. in New Hampshire might be.

 

Answer: The records for each surviving lodge should be in the possession of the secretary of that lodge.  Since you did not mention the town or city you will want to contact the New Hampshire state office for the Odd Fellows at: http://www.ioof.org/jurisdictions/newhampshire.html   They should be able to inform you where the records for the particular Odd Fellows Lodge are currently.


Questions from the upcoming 1940 U.S. Census

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I realize the U.S. Census of 1940 will be made public in April next year.  Can you tell me the questions I might find, are they public?

 

Answer:  The 1940 United States Census questions are public already.  You can find the questions for the upcoming census release online at: http://www.1930census.com/1940_census_questions.php


Searching for the V.R.C. during the Civil War.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  Recently I discovered a relative had two photos of my ancestor in the Civil War with slightly different uniforms.  I am trying to obtain a scan of the image.  However the information on the back may offer a clue.  One photograpj says he was with the 18th Massachusetts Infantry, and the other simply says “3rd VRC”.  I thought it might be for Vermont Cavalry but no luck so far.  Can you offer any help?

 

Answer:  The VRC is an abbreviation for the Union Army - Veteran Reserve Corps.  This corps was originally known as the Invalid Corps.  It was created to allow those with a partial disability to perform light military duty, and they would not be on the front lines.  An interesting website detailing the uniforms worn by the VRC can be seen at: http://www.cjdaley.com/vrc.htm


Researching Connecticut veterans in the French and Indian War.

(Military Records) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I am searching for my ancestor who served in the French and Indian War from Connecticut in 1760.  Can you offer me a published source I can search at NEHGS?

 

Answer: I would recommend using the Connecticut Historical Society series of two volumes - Roll of Connecticut Men in the French and Indian Wars, 1755-1762. (Hartford, CT: Conn. Historical Society, 1903-05).  NEHGS Call # [F97/C7/v. 9-10].


Searching New Brunswick, Canada Deeds Online.

(Deeds) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I am researching deeds for my ancestors in Westmorland and Queens County, New Brunswick.  My research in the fabulous collection NEHGS has of probate microfilm was a success.

 

Answer:  Just recently the Family History Library has digitized the indexes and the deeds for New Brunswick counties.  When NEHGS was purchasing microfilm we only received permission to get deeds from Albert County.  However you can search them all online  by browsing the images.  First use the deed index for the specific county.  You can then browse through the images one by one.  Once you find a match you can swap to the deed record volumes.   Again you will need to browse through the records to find the specific citation you located in the index.  I used this for a search and it averaged about 5-10 minutes to get from the index to the record.

 

To access this collection go online to: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12128-154100-88?cc=1392378&wc=12851918#uri=https%3A%2F%2Fapi.familysearch.org%2Frecords%2Fcollection%2F1392378%2Fwaypoints


An occupation from the 1891 Census of England.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I came across a curious occupation for my 53 year old ancestor in Manchester, England on the 1891 Census.  I am not entirely clear what he did for work with the occupation of "Mill - Apron man"?

 

Answer: The occupation of an "Apronman" was that of a mechanic.  In the world of industrial Manchester, England I am sure your ancestor was employed in one of the mills as a mechanic in the 1890's.


Burton family of Hingham, Massachusetts in the 17th century.

(Boston) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I have found a series of old family correspondence about a colonial ancestor Edward Burton.  I know only he was living in Hingham, Mass. in the 1600's.  Can you tell me what might be the latest work on this immigrant.

 

Answer:  The latest work on Edward Burton who died in Hingham, Mass. ca. 1670 appears in The Great Migration Begins, 1:283-85.  As a member of NEHGS you can see the sketch that was prepared by Robert Charles Anderson online at: http://www.americanancestors.org/PageDetail.aspx?recordId=135633666


Looking for a town of a soldier in New Hampshire from the War of 1812.

(Military Records, New Hampshire, War of 1812) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: On a military record of enlistment in 1812, my relative Solomon Liscomb  stated he was born in Hamworth or Hanworth, Strafford County. I cannot locate any such place  on maps or atlases, or any further information. Did it exist in 1812, and if so, where was it?

 

Answer:  The community you are looking for sounds like “Hamworth” but it is actually spelled Tamworth.  This town was incorporated in 1766 and was part of Strafford County.  That portion of Strafford County is now part of Carroll County since 1840.

  


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