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Ask a Genealogist: WWI Pilot from Canada.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Chief Genealogist

Question: I recall my grandfather saying he knew a great WWI pilot during the war.  He served in Canada, and all I know the person was named Bill Bishop, any ideas?

Answer: The person in question is Canada's World War I Fighter Ace William Bishop (1884-1956).  He had seventy two confirmed victories as a pilot during the Great War.  A small biography can be found online here: http://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/bishop.htm


The Online Genealogist: Canada passenger arrivals 1870's.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: Can you tell me where I might find the arrival of a Scottish family into Canada in the 1870's?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Answer: The Canadian Archives has available passenger lists for arrivals from 1865 to 1935 searchable online.  The records can be examined at this website: http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/022/022-908.003-e.html

The Online Genealogist: Nova Scotia Crown Land Grant Maps

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I can not visit NEHGS, but would be interested in looking at Crown Land Grant maps for Nova Scotia.  Can you advise where I might locate these for searching outside NEHGS.

Answer: NEHGS does have a complete collection of the A.F. Church county maps, and the Crown Land Grant Maps for Nova Scotia.  To view the Crown Land Grant maps in color online go to: http://www.gov.ns.ca/natr/land/grantmap.asp   Simply click on the square that is located where the grant occured, and the image can be enlarged and saved to your computer.


The Online Genealogist: What was WRC on a death notice?

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I found an obituary clipped from 1917 in my grandmother's bible.  I believe this is  for her aunt by marriage.  However a curious abbreviation is on it.  It states services will be handles by her WRC chapter.  What does this stand for?                                                                                  Answer: The W.R.C. stands for the Woman's Relief Corps, this was the auxiliary to the Union Army's Grand Army of the Republic.  Membership was made up originally of mother's, wives, widows and daughters of Union Civil War veterans.  The organization was founded in 1883 and is still existing.  To learn more about what they do go online to: http://suvcw.org/WRC/whatwedo.htm

The Online Genealogist: English Maps for Registration districts.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: Can you tell me a good website for figuring out the Civil Registration districts for English villages in the 19th century?

Answer: I would suggest the map website I use on http://maps.familysearch.org     This has proved to be very useful for more than the district.  I used this website for maps and information about the parish my great-grandfather was born in Blakenhall, Cheshire, England.  The following data was supplied: Wybunbury is an Ancient Parish in the county of Cheshire. Other places in the parish include: Basford, Bartherton, Batherton, Blakenhall, Bridgemere, Bridgmere, Checkley cum Wrinehill, Chorlton, Hatherton, Hough, Hunsterson, Lea, Rope, Shavington cum Gresty, Sound, Stapeley, Walgherton, and Willaston. Records begin Parish Records 1558, Bishops Transcripts 1600. Non-Church of England denominations identified in Wybunbury include: Primitive Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Association.


The Online Genealogist: The birth of the Tintype photograph.

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David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question:  I have some old metal tintype photos.  Can you tell me when they first started using this form of photography in the United States?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Answer:  The mention of such a photo process was discussed by Adolphe-Alexandre Martin in France in the year 1853.  A gentleman by the name of Hamilton Smith patented the idea in the U.S. in 1856.  Most tintypes I have examined however are generally from the 1860's to the early 1900's. This is the original patent for the idea in the U.S. in 1856 - http://www.google.com/patents/US14300?pg=PA1&dq=hamilton+smith+photography&hl=en&sa=X&ei=wTqbULG4CK-n0AGui4DgAw&sqi=2&pjf=1&ved=0CDQQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=hamilton%20smith%20photography&f=false

The Online Genealogist: What was a Webster?

(Occupations) Permanent link
 
David Allen Lambert

David Allen Lambert
NEHGS Online Genealogist

Question: I was examining a probate in Cheshire England in 1628, the occupation is not common.  Can you tell me what a webster was?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Answer: A webster was the occupation of a loom operator.  This was also know as a weaver, and was generally a female occupation when dealing with the looms.

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