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The Daily Genealogist: Natural Disasters

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked whether you have Irish ancestors. 4,056 people answered this survey. The results are:

  • 28%, Yes, I have Irish ancestors but I don't know from where in Ireland they originated.
  • 26%, Yes, I have Irish ancestors and I know the county in Ireland from which at least one of these ancestors originated.
  • 22%, Yes, I have Irish ancestors and I know the home parish and county in Ireland from which at least one of these ancestors originated.
  • 16%, No, I don't have Irish ancestors.
  • 8%, I don't know whether I have Irish ancestors.

 This week's survey asks whether your ancestors were affected by a disaster. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Alcibiades

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ALCIBIADES (m): A prominent Athenian statesman (ca. 450-404 B.C.) during the Peloponnesian War, who claimed descent from the Argonaut Nestor (who appears in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey). In childhood a ward of Pericles, and later a friend of the philosopher Socrates, Alcibiades held power in Athens but defected to Sparta after accusations of sacrilege, and later to Persia. Returning to Athens, he was reinstated and was instrumental in several victories but was again exiled and later assassinated; his character and career are still controversial. Alcibiades Whittier (b. Dorchester, Mass. ca. 1818-20) of Reading, Mass. was a cabinet maker in Massachusetts (he is enumerated in Reading in 1850 as “Archibald” Whittier, in the household of future father-in-law Washington Damon); a later Alcibiades [also later Archibald] Whittier (ca. 1840-1928), a carriage maker in Hyde Park, Mass., was related, but apparently not a son.

The Daily Genealogist: Gorham Historical Society, Maine

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Gorham Historical Society, Maine

The town of Gorham is located in southeastern Maine. The Gorham Historical Society has made a number of resources available on its website. You must download these databases, in Microsoft Excel format, to your computer before opening them. Click on the Databases tab to open a new page with links to the society’s databases. The online resources include the following:

Vital Records from Town Reports
There are three vital records databases — births, marriages, and deaths. The databases cover the period from 1893 through 1944. There are about 2,500 birth records in the Town Report Births database. The data fields include family name, father, mother, date of birth, and son or daughter. The Town Report Deaths database contains nearly 3,500 records. The data fields include last name, first name, date of death, age, and cause of death. The Town Reports Marriage database contains 1,860 records. The data fields include groom’s last and first name, groom’s residence, bride’s last and first name, bride’s residence, date of marriage, and name of officiant.

Early Records of Gorham
The information in this database appears to have been extracted from Gorham’s early town records. It covers only surnames beginning with the letters A, B, and C. The data fields include last name, first name, event (birth/death/marriage), date of event, father’s name, mother’s name, spouse name, volume and page, and miscellaneous. Information found in the miscellaneous field includes information about where the individual came from, age, where born, spouse’s name, who married, and where married.

Town of Gorham Cemetery Records
This database contains more than 8,000 records of burials in Gorham cemeteries. The data fields include last name, first name, cemetery name, section, lot, gravesite, date of burial, and comments. Information found in the comments field includes lot ownership data, birth date, age, where buried when the burial took place outside of Gorham, name of spouse or parents, name of person the individual is buried next to, cremation, and location within the lot.

First Parish Church Membership Records
This database contains records of the membership of the First Parish Church in Gorham. There are nearly 5,000 individual records. The earliest record of admission dates from 1803 and the latest date of dismissal is in 2008. The data fields include last name, first name, date of admission, date of dismissal, reason for dismissal, record book or report information, and comments. Information included in the comments field most often contains names of individuals related to the church member. Data in the dismissal field may include the location to which dismissed members moved.

There is also a brief chronology of historical events that occurred in the town of Gorham between 1736 and 2007. Click on the Events tab to access it.


The Daily Genealogist: Lowell Genealogy Wins Donald Lines Jacobus Prize

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
lowell cover




This marks the third national or regional award for the Lowell genealogy

 The New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) announced today that its Newbury Street Press book, The Descendants of Judge John Lowell of Newburyport, Massachusetts, by Scott C. Steward and Christopher C. Child, has won another top honor.  The American Society of Genealogists (ASG) awarded the Lowell book the Donald Lines Jacobus Award.

 The prestigious Donald Lines Jacobus Award was established in 1972 to encourage sound scholarship in genealogical writing. It is presented to a model genealogical work published within the previous five years. Nominations for the Jacobus Award are made by Fellows of the American Society of Genealogists who edit journals that run book reviews.

 This marks the third award in 2012 for the Lowell genealogy. Earlier this year, the book won the National Genealogical Society Award for Excellence, Genealogy and Family History, and the Connecticut Society of Genealogists' Grand Prize, Literary Awards Contest in Genealogy.

 NEHGS Director of Publications and book co-author Scott C. Steward said, “We had hoped to make the Lowell book a model, both as a genealogy and as an example of book production at Newbury Street Press, so having our work recognized by NGS and CSG – and now the ASG – is extremely rewarding.”

 The book marks the first full treatment of the Lowell family since an 1899 genealogy written by Delmar R. Lowell. This new book traces descendants of Judge John Lowell (1743-1802) to the present day, and includes famous descendants Francis Cabot Lowell, for whom the city of Lowell, Massachusetts is named; John Lowell, Jr., founder of the Lowell Institute in Boston; James Russell Lowell, the poet and diplomat; astronomer Percival Lowell; Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell; the poets Amy Lowell and Robert Traill Spence Lowell; architect Guy Lowell; and Isabella Stewart Gardner, art patron and museum founder. The book comprises more than one thousand entries for heads of families. Because of several early cousin marriages, many Lowell descendants have two or even three lines of descent from Judge John Lowell.

 


The Daily Genealogist: Ireland Reaching Out Diaspora Project

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

I recently learned about the Ireland Reaching Out (Ireland XO) Diaspora project. According to the group’s website, “the Ireland XO project is based on a simple idea; instead of waiting for Irish-Americans and their global counterparts to come to Ireland to trace their roots, we go the other way. Working through voluntary effort at a townland, village and parish level, we identify who left, and trace them and their descendants worldwide, proactively engaging with them and inviting them to become part of an extended ‘virtual’ community with their place of origin. In this way, the entire Irish Diaspora of 70 million can be systematically reunified online and invited back to engage with their ancestral parish for the benefit of all. . . . ”

“While Ireland XO parish volunteers are reaching out around the world, the project’s website provides a landing point in Ireland for people abroad who have some detail about where their emigrant ancestors come from in Ireland. By joining any parish community online, they can seek direct genealogical research assistance from local people in the area who also volunteer to meet them on their return. This “Meet/Greet/Connect” offer from parish communities across Ireland has been identified as a missing element from developing the Irish Diaspora in times past.” A successful pilot already occurred in South-East Galway and the project was launched as a “National Diaspora Programme” in March 2012.

I’m very intrigued by this project. Instead of a descendant tracing one ancestor back to a place of origin, this model has the impetus for the search coming from the place of origin, with a goal of reconstructing the essence of a long-vanished community. This effort reminds me of the numerous and very popular old settlers organizations and Old Home weeks held in New England and elsewhere in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. (For an article on this topic, see “Tracking Migrating Families: The Records of Old Settlers Organizations,” by Paula Stuart Warren in the winter 2010 issue of American Ancestors.) In the Internet age, it will be fascinating to see what kinds of genealogical and historical connections can be made on a group level across time and distance.


The Daily Genealogist: After Uproar, Georgia Officials Back Off Archives Plan

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

“Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal . . . announced that he was restoring $125,000 of a $733,000 budget cut so that the archives could remain open two days a week and visitors could view records without making an appointment.”

The Daily Genealogist: Ancestry.com Sets $1.6 Billion Deal

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

“Online family history website Ancestry.com said Monday it has agreed to be acquired by European private equity company Permira for $1.6 billion, or $32 a share.”

The Daily Genealogist: Old Pieces Connect Us to the Past

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The writer muses on his family possessions: “Through the years, I rescued many odd pieces that would have been lost. I live with them. They connect me to loved ones, no longer living, and to ancestors I never even knew.”

The Daily Genealogist: Ghosts of World War II: The Photographs Found at Flea Markets Superimposed on to Modern Street Scenes

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

After purchasing 300 old negatives at a local flea market, historical consultant Jo Teeuwisse of Amsterdam began a project to “overlay modern scenes from France with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war.”

The Daily Genealogist: Do you have Irish ancestors?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked whether you had ancestors who lived in Connecticut. The results are:

74%, Yes, I have ancestors who lived in Connecticut.
20%, No, I don’t have ancestors who lived in Connecticut.
6%, I don’t know if I have ancestors who lived in Connecticut.

This week's survey asks if you have Irish ancestors. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Nuss

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

NUSS (m): Nuss S. Butterfield (d. 1839) of Stockbridge, Vt. (Hartford Probate District, Vt.; with thanks to Scott Andrew Bartley, who brought this name to my attention many years ago). Mr. Butterfield’s first name is probably a truncated form of some name with –nus as an element, perhaps the final syllable (e.g. Oceanus), a construction that abounds in both Latin and Greek. NUSS might also be a derivative of Celtic NAOISE (pronounced something like NEE-sheh), a name borne in ancient Ireland by the lover of Deirdre. I rather suspect a classical, or commemorative, derivation in this case.

The Daily Genealogist: Sevier County Public Library System, Tennessee

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Sevier County Public Library System, Tennessee

Sevier County is located in eastern Tennessee. Its county seat is Sevierville. The Sevier County Public Library System has made a number of genealogical and local history resources available through the Sevier County History Center. Click on the tabs in the contents list near the top of the page to access them.

Before Fire
A fire in Sevierville in 1856 destroyed the county’s new courthouse and nearly all of its records. On this webpage the library has collected resources on families, businesses, and records in existence prior to 1856. There are links to land records, birth and death records, marriage records, store accounts and records, soldiers' records, and warrants.

Churches
This section contains more than sixty church histories.

Court Records
This section contains a variety of items. There is an article about the Sevier County Poor Farm and a list of individuals buried in the Poor Farm Cemetery. There are marriage records for individuals in the 1812 pensions list who married in Sevier County, the 1856–1900 and 1900–1914 bride and groom combined indexes, and bride and groom indexes for 1914–1920. There are also four Chancery Court databases: a Chancery Court divorces index, deeds recorded after the 1856 fire, pre-1900 Chancery Court files in the Sevier County archive, and Sevier County deeds for 1820–1911.

Families
Here you will find links to websites that feature Sevier County families. There are also links to nearly twenty family Bible records, some to scanned images of the pages and some to transcriptions of the records.

History
Several different collections are available here. Click on the “Articles done by Ms. Linn” link to read biographical information about the late county historian and some of her articles. One of the articles covers Sevier County officials since 1794. There are also links to local histories, birth records for 1908–1912, and a cemetery index. The data fields in the birth record files include child’s name, birth date, sex, race, birthplace, father’s name, father’s birthplace, mother’s name, mother’s birthplace, name of the person who delivered the baby, and certificate number.

Schools
This section includes an article on the Sevier County Community Schools, a list of former Sevier County schools, and school superintendents.

Great Smoky Mountains Property Purchase Database
When the federal government purchased land to create the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the 1920s and 1930s, records were kept about the properties that were acquired. Index cards were created to record information about each property at the time of purchase. The amount of information varies. (The cards do not provide information about who was living on the properties at the time of purchase.) Click on the GSM Land tab in the contents list to access the alphabetical-by-surname database. The data fields in the index are Government Tract number, name, number of acres, and deed number. Click on the data in the record to view the scanned index card. Click on the Maps link to view maps with the properties identified by tract number.


The Daily Genealogist: The Connecticut Historical Society Library

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last Friday I attended a meeting at the Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford, and had the pleasure of viewing the exhibits and exploring the library. Founded in 1825, CHS has served as a repository for the state’s artifacts and archives for nearly two hundred years. If you have Connecticut ancestors — and even if you don’t — you will likely find much to engage your interest here.

CHS, located in Hartford’s West End in a mansion built in 1928 by Curtis Veeder, offers plenty of free parking. The main exhibit, Making Connecticut, “is the story of all the people of Connecticut, from the 1500s through today. Themes of daily life, clothing, transportation, sports and leisure, work, and social change run throughout the exhibit.” Don’t miss the gallery of inn and tavern signs; the CHS collection is the largest in the country. My favorites were the early toll road signs. There are also changing exhibits. The CHS website features some interesting collection highlights.

Genealogists will feel right at home in the cozy Research Center. The website’s research page provides a good introduction to the collection, and includes links to online catalogs, finding aids, and subject guides. Open shelves contain Connecticut city directories, genealogies, and local histories. The local histories aren’t limited to Connecticut locations; I saw many Massachusetts county and town resources, as well as material for the other New England states. Also available are Connecticut atlases, genealogical and historical reference books, and general reference notebooks on various collections available in the Research Center, including many paintings and photographs.

Other resources in closed stacks can be retrieved upon request. Of particular interest are the genealogical manuscripts — hundreds of boxes and files containing material on particular families and towns compiled by family researchers and professional genealogists. The information within the files “includes compiled family histories, data sheets, notes, copies of Bible records, miscellaneous abstracts of probate, land, church, and vital records.” The work of genealogists such as Lucius B. Barbour and Donald Lines Jacobus, among others, is represented. To access this collection, speak to a librarian.

Additional information about family history resources at CHS is available online.


The Daily Genealogist: Researchers Wring Hands as U.S. Clamps Down on Death Record Access

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“A shift last year by the Social Security Administration to limit access to its death records amid concerns about identity theft is beginning to hamper a range of research, including federal assessments of hospital safety and efforts by the financial industry to spot consumer fraud.”

The Daily Genealogist: Website Connects Families with Lost Heirlooms, Antiques

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A South Carolina man found a World War I Army poster with his grandfather's name listed as a sergeant on a website that aims to match “orphaned heirlooms” with interested family members.

 


The Daily Genealogist: For Middle-Earth, One Family Tree to Rule Them All

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

“Emil Johansson, a university student in Gothenburg, Sweden . . . has spent the past several years creating a comprehensive census and family tree of all the characters — over 900 of them — created by Tolkien for his fantasy world.”

The Daily Genealogist: Connecticut Ancestors

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked where you currently reside.

27%, I live in New England (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT).
12%, I live in the Mid-Atlantic (DE, MD, NJ, NY, PA, DC).
15%, I live in the South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV).
14%, I live in the Midwest (IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI).
7%, I live in the Southwest (AZ, OK, NM, TX).
22%, I live in the West (AK, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, OR, UT, WA, WY).
2%, I live in Canada.
<1%, I live elsewhere in North America.
<1%, I live in the British Isles.
<1%, I live in Europe.
<1%, I live in Asia.
<1%, I live in Australia or New Zealand.
<1%, I do not live in any of the regions listed above.

This week's survey asks if you have ancestors who lived in Connecticut. Take the survey now!

 


The Daily Genealogist: Minerva

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

MINERVA (f): Roman name for the Greek goddess ATHENE, popular in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century New England, as well as in the rest of the country (often seen in the nickname form MINNIE). Nearly 14,000 women in the 1850 census were named Minerva. They include Minerva Bangs (born abt. 1840) of Prescott, Massachusetts; Minevra Cashdollar (born abt. 1839) of Etna, Ohio; and Minerva Royce (born abt. 1765) of Berkshire, Vermont.

The Daily Genealogist: Colorado Cemetery Indexes

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Hillside Cemetery, Silverton, Colorado

Originally a mining camp, the town of Silverton is the county seat of San Juan County. It is located in the southwestern part of the state. The Hillside Cemetery website is the result of the work of Freda Carley Peterson, who spent years researching and compiling the burial records of San Juan County. She has written books about burials in Hillside Cemetery and stories about those buried there. Excerpts from her book, The Story of Hillside, may be viewed by clicking on the Excerpts link in the contents list.

The website contains two databases that are alphabetical indexes to more than 3,000 documented burials in San Juan County. (As noted on the site, the earliest known county burial took place in 1872.) Click on the Burial Surnames tab in the contents list to open a new page with links to the burial listings. The first is Burial Surnames at Hillside Cemetery. Click to choose a letter link which will lead you to a PDF file containing burial information for individuals whose surnames begin with that letter. The data in the records may include the following information: name of the deceased, cause of death, spouse’s name, parent’s name(s), age, date of birth, date of death, veteran status, occupation, and place of burial. Click on the Burial Surnames outside of Hillside Cemetery link to open a new page with a short list of individuals buried in two other cemeteries in San Juan County.

The website also has a photo gallery that contains 100 captioned images of gravestones in the Silverton Hillside Cemetery. Click on the Photo Gallery link to access them.

Brush Memorial Cemetery, Brush, Colorado

The City of Brush is in Morgan County, which is located in northwest Colorado. It was incorporated in 1884. The city was named to honor a cattleman named Jared L. Brush, who served as Lieutenant Governor of Colorado. Jared Brush sold the land for the cemetery to the city in 1893. The Jared L. Brush Cemetery was established in 1895. The cemetery is divided into three sections — North Cemetery, South Cemetery, New North Cemetery — and a columbarium.

Click on the Interment Directory link to download a PDF file containing a list with more than 7,000 records of burials in the cemetery. The list is organized alphabetically by the surname of the owner/deceased. The remaining data fields in the index are section-block, lot, grave, born, deceased, and comments. The comments field includes the names of other related individuals, removals, veteran status, and inscriptions.

You will also find links to PDF maps of each section and the columbarium. Each map sheet has a section for recording grave location information. There is also a link to the cemetery’sFind A Grave webpage. You will also find photographs of many of the cemetery’s gravestones on this site.


The Daily Genealogist: A Featured Blog by Sally Mack

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Our latest blog profile features “I Think We’re Related” by Sally Mack. Here Sally introduces her blog:

I have been blogging since 2008, mostly sharing the things I love — photography, writing, lampworking, and building a kayak. But, by far, my most favorite blog is the genealogy blog that I started early in 2011 after my father passed away. I wanted to make sure that all the information that I found on his family would be available to my family and those who are seeking it.

I started researching my father's family seriously in 2000, when the family got together to celebrate my father's 80th birthday in Nova Scotia, the birthplace of his father. In 2010 I attended Boston University's Genealogical Research Certificate Program online. That definitely turned me into a much better researcher. Nowadays I practice the art of genealogical research as often as I can, and sometimes it appears in my blog. I do enjoy the standard research — town records, libraries and archives — but I really get a thrill when I find things that belonged to my relatives, or stories and photographs on the Internet. I am a big fan of researching with Google. 

The journey into the past is never ending for me — there will always be questions and, hopefully, corresponding answers. I really enjoy sharing my searches and my discoveries through my blog. I know that my children will have the family information at their fingertips, and will hopefully continue the tradition. 

As an extra bonus, I have met new relatives through my blog that I probably would never have known. That is a thrill — to have contact with a relative who read my blog and wanted to share what they knew, too.


The Daily Genealogist: Half-brothers Meet for the First Time, Thanks to Toronto Daily Star Article

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

"That Gary, 68, should ever meet his half-brother, Keith Haakon Fackrell, 54, from Australia, would have been improbable, were it not for the Internet, a curious wife and daughter, a photo in a 1945 Toronto Daily Star story, and, well, fate."

 


The Daily Genealogist: Viking Legacy in Galway to Be Studied

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

A new DNA "study will reveal whether Galway’s medieval families are genetically linked to Normans or to Vikings, and it will investigate the extent to which the Vikings intermarried with the native population."

More information on the study and on Viking settlers in Ireland is available on the study's website.


The Daily Genealogist: Piecing Together “The World’s Largest Jigsaw Puzzle”

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

In 1989, East Germany’s secret police tore up millions of files compiled as a result of decades of spying on its citizens. Today, with these files in huge demand, "archivists are now using groundbreaking computer technology to reconstruct those shredded files."

The Daily Genealogist: Current Residence

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey

Last week’s survey asked if you have any ancestors in common with U.S. presidents.

12%, Yes, I have ancestors in common with one U.S. president.

26%Yes, I have ancestors in common with 2 to 4 U.S. presidents.

11%, Yes, I have ancestors in common with 5 to 9 U.S. presidents.

6%, Yes, I have ancestors in common with 10 or more U.S. presidents.

16%, No, I do not have any ancestors in common with U.S. presidents.

29%, I don't know if I have any ancestors in common with U.S. presidents.

 

This week's survey asks where you currently reside. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Callisthenes

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

CALLISTHENES (m): Permenio Callisthenes Shaw, son of Jonathan Shaw Jr. of Raynham, b. 7 Oct. 1779, took his second name from Callisthenes, the official historian of the court of Alexander the Great (356–323 B.C., ruled from 336). Callisthenes, a nephew of Alexander’s tutor, the philosopher Aristotle, died after becoming involved in a conspiracy to kill Alexander. His history of the reign, since lost, was one of the principal sources for the later historians Arrian, Quintus Curtius, Plutarch, and their successors.

The Daily Genealogist: PeabodyMassArchives.com

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

PeabodyMassArchives.com

The city of Peabody is located in Essex County, in northeastern Massachusetts. Peabody was a center for New England’s leather industry, and was home to many manufactories and tanneries. Its nickname is Tanner City.

The PeabodyMassArchives website is a collaboration between the city of Peabody, the Peabody Institute Library, the Peabody Historical Society, and the George Peabody House.

Public Records
Click on the Public Records link to open a page from which you can access the site’s collection of Peabody birth, marriage, and death records for 1855 to 1880. Click on a record type to open a new page. On the left side of the page you will find an alphabetical list linked to pages in the vital records index. Click on the appropriate link to view the index page. Once you find a record of interest, note the page number. Return to that record’s main page and, on the right, click on the appropriate link to view the record.

Manuscripts
Click on the Manuscripts link to view the South Danvers Ladies’ Soldiers Aid Society letters collection. Peabody resident Eunice Cook formed the society in 1861, and the members raised funds and supplies for use by the United States Sanitary Commission. Cook received letters from many individuals who aided the wounded. Fourteen letters have been uploaded to the website. Click on the image title (date and correspondent’s name) to download a PDF of a letter. To download a transcription, click on transcription link.

Peabody Paragraphs
The Peabody Paragraphs page can be accessed by clicking on the Periodicals link in the menu bar at the top of the homepage. The Peabody Paragraphs articles were featured in the Salem Evening News, and provided readers with information about everyday life in Peabody. The column included political and social news and even gossip. The Peabody Institute Library has scrapbooks containing the articles from 1915 to 1939. Currently, articles from September through December 1915 are available on the website. To view an article, click on the date link. A new page will open with a digitized image of the article.

Photo Galleries
There are a number of photo galleries on the website. Click on the “Photo Galleries” link in the menu bar at the top of the homepage for access. Click on the thumbnail images to enlarge them. The collections include Peabody in Pictures (photographs of Peabody from a century ago); Leather Work (photographs of Peabody’s leatherwork factories and leather workers); Century Chest (photographs and messages from a time capsule that the people of Peabody assembled in 1902); and two galleries with photographs and other images of George Peabody, the nineteenth-century entrepreneur and philanthropist for whom the city was named.


The Daily Genealogist: More on Ancestral Political Affiliations

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

In response to last week’s note on ancestral political affiliations, several readers wrote in with some stories and useful tips:

John D. Tew of Purcellville, Virginia: Don Benoit, a cousin who I found through genealogical research – our great-grandfathers were brothers — related a family story that helped me determine someone’s politics. When Don's father was born in 1933 in Oneco, Connecticut, Don's great-grandfather, Elisha Tew, age 76 or 77, reportedly walked the six miles to Oneco from his home in Rhode Island. Upon seeing his new grandson, Elisha announced, "I can now die a happy man because I have a grandson and there is a Democrat as president!" The story provided a pretty good indication about where Elisha's political loyalties rested.

Ann Andersen of Aurora, Colorado: You can sometimes find your ancestor’s political affiliation by determining which newspaper printed their obituary. A number of towns had at least two newspapers with different political leanings.

Janet Pease of Arvada, Colorado: You might also be able to tell ancestral political affiliations by the names of children. My grandfather, born in 1880, had the middle name Garfield, and his older brother's middle name was Fremont — both "Republican" names. Grandpa, however, became a Roosevelt Democrat during the Great Depression and never wavered from his choice!

An interesting article, “Would a Rose by Any Other Name Still Be a Democrat? How Your First Name Can Predict Your Politics,” based on lists of donors to the Obama and Romney campaigns, argues that "names are a strong predictor of support for one party or the other.” Here are some of the findings: “People named William have a 57 percent chance of supporting the Republicans, while Willies are the most Democratic name on the list at 93 percent. . . People named Liz are extremely Democratic, with only 11 percent donating to Republicans. But 26 percent of Elizabeths give to the GOP, and Betty is one of the most Republican women’s names on the list.” You can also enter your own name and view the results.


The Daily Genealogist: Should Gravestone Information Go High-Tech?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Today’s gravestones options include a plaque with a quick-response matrix barcode, which allows access to a webpage with the person's biography, obituary, photos, and even video.

The Daily Genealogist: Bible Discovered on Gabriola a Family “Treasure”

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor


A tattered family Bible donated to a Gabriola, British Columbia, libraryfound a new home with an Australian descendant of the book’s 1742 owner, Richard Pentecost. 

 


The Daily Genealogist: Budget Cuts to Hobble State Archives in Georgia

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

This article discusses not only the Georgia Archives but the general state of archives nationwide. The Georgia “closing is simply the most severe symptom of a greater crisis facing permanent government collections in nearly every state, professional archivists say.”

The Daily Genealogist: The Great New England Vampire Panic

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

“Two hundred years after the Salem Witch Trials, farmers became convinced that their relatives were returning from the grave to feed on the living.”

The Daily Genealogist: U.S. President Ancestral Connections

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked if any of your ancestors were elected to public office.

68%, Yes.
15%, No.
17%, I don’t know.

This week's survey asks whether you have any ancestors in common with U.S. presidents. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Sinkler

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

SINKLER (m): Phonetic spelling of SINCLAIR. Sinkler Bean (1720-1798) was born at Brentwood, N.H., and died at Salisbury, N.H., son of John and Sarah (Sinkler) Bean. The 1850 census lists three other men with the first name Sinkler and 118 people with the surname Sinkler.

The Daily Genealogist: Montgomery County Archives, Tennessee

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Montgomery County Archives, Tennessee

Montgomery County is located in northern Tennessee, in the western part of the state. Clarksville is the county seat.

The Montgomery County Department of Preservation of Records, more commonly known as the Archives, was created in January 1995. The Archives “houses the historic, permanent records of Montgomery County Government and manuscript special collections” and the Records Center “stores the non-current records of various county government agencies.” Nearly all pre-1950 Montgomery County records have been transferred to the Archives. A number of collections have been made available online. Click on the database title link to open a search page.

Deed Index
Montgomery County’s deeds index covers the period from 1788 through 1797. It is an every name index. You can search the database by name or select search criteria from title, role, and date drop-down lists. The data fields in the results are surname, given name, title, role, date, and book/page number. Roles include grantee, adjacent, assignor by heirs, surveyor, and grantor.

Marriage Index
The recording of marriages began in 1838 in Montgomery County. This database is an every name index. You can search the database by name or select a role from the drop-down list. In addition to bride and groom, roles include bondsman, mother of the bride or groom, father of the bride or groom, official, and more. The index currently includes official county marriage records from 1838 recorded in Book 1, the bride and groom index through 1888 (Book 10), and also records from four other sources detailed on the website. When completed, the index will include marriages through 1953. The data fields in the search results are surname, given name, title, role, and record date.

Voter’s List, 1891
Because the 1890 census for Tennessee no longer exists, this database can be of use to individuals whose ancestors lived in Montgomery County in 1891. An act of the General Assembly of Tennessee authorized the “enumeration of male inhabitants of twenty-one years of age and upward, citizens of Tennessee” on 1 January 1891. You can search the database by name or select a district or age from the drop down lists. The data fields in the search results are surname, first name, district, age, race, and page number.

Obituary Collection
The Obituary Collection database covers the period from 1995 to 2009, with some records from earlier dates. The obituaries indexed are from various newspapers. You can search the database by name, birth date, deceased date, and city or state, or select criteria from the drop-down list containing cemetery names. The data fields in the search results are name, birth date, deceased date, city/state, and cemetery. You may purchase a copy of an obituary from the Archives for a small fee.

Probate or Will Book
This database in an index to early Montgomery County probate books for the years 1785 to 1813, In addition to wills and administrations the records include “bills of sale, ferry bonds, bonds of county officials, sales regarding judgments, apprenticeships, emancipations, and bastardy bonds, to name only a few.” You can search the database by name or select a person’s role or year of the case from the drop-down lists. The data fields in the search results are name, role, year, and book letter/page number.


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