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The Daily Genealogist: Readers Respond

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Recent Weekly Genealogist surveys have asked about summer houses, family reunions, and family associations. Here are some reader comments on these topics:

Pam Tice of New York, N.Y.: My family’s been vacationing in South Wellfleet, Massachusetts, for more than 100 years. I've been researching the area and the families that have lived there for some time, and now I have started a blog (www.southwellfleet.wordpress.com) to share my research. I'm focusing on the five miles or so surrounding the old cottages, and am using my interest in history combined with skills I’ve developed researching various family histories.

Mildred Clough of Redwood City, California: I am a part owner of a summer home bought 103 years ago by my grandfather on the shores of Lake Champlain in Vermont. I put the history together in a book with pictures and a bit of genealogy of the five generations that have enjoyed it. The house was about nineteen years old when my grandparents bought it and it has grown in all directions to accommodate the growing family in the years since then.

Marlene Case of Foxboro, Wisconsin: My son, daughter, grandson, and I attended a family reunion in Westerville, Ohio, this summer, which celebrated the 100th birthday of my cousin, Arlene Edwards Melander. Through discussions with family members, and some research at the Ohio Genealogical Society, near Westerville, I connected with a heretofore unknown cousin in Illinois, who helped me not only break through a brick wall to find my grandfather's grandfather, but to find a patriot in my grandfather's mother's Lipe line. Not only was I able to scan lots of photos of our Edwards and Lipe ancestors, but I am now eligible to join the DAR! It was a most enjoyable and productive reunion.

Kari Lemons of Mountain View, California: We attend a different kind of reunion every summer in the Colorado Rockies. My two children are adopted from Cambodia. We attend Colorado Cambodian Heritage Camp, which this year included 69 adoptive families representing all the states, 41 college-age Cambodian counselors, and a group of 30 Cambodian-Americans who assist the camp with cooking, music, native dance, native art projects, and in many other ways. During the five years we have attended my children have stopped hating their brown skin, gained pride for their birth country, and now as teens are learning what it means to be Cambodian-American. This is our family reunion every summer.

Karen Festa of Byfield, Massachusetts: I thought I would share how my "family association" came to be. I first started gathering information about my family in 2000, and when I retired from teaching in 2009, I was able to pick up the small threads I had and begin to develop them. I reconnected with a cousin and we shared information. This led to contacting other cousins and getting together periodically to share information, stories, pictures, and food. I began to put together a picture history of the family with some basic facts about each person and his or her individual family, and we decided to expand this into a book. The information and photographs cover our parents, grandparents, and the names of our great-grandparents, as well as our generation and our children’s generation. My personal journey has developed through the interest of my cousins, finding relatives in our families, and gaining enough confidence in my research methods to begin delving into the possibility of researching in Poland. It's been quite an adventure.


The Daily Genealogist: Polycarp

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

POLYCARP (m): St. Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna (ca. 70-23 Feb. 156 A.D.), an early martyr, was said to have known the Apostle John. He was a formative figure of the early generations of the Christian Church (Henry Wace and William C. Piercy, eds., A Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature to the End of the Sixth Century A.D., with an Account of the Principal Sects and Heresies [London: John Murray, 1911, repr. Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson Publishers, 1994], pp. 846-50). Polycarpus Nelson of Mamaroneck, N.Y., is mentioned by Jacobus (Donald Lines Jacobus, Genealogy as Pastime and Profession [New Haven, Conn.: Tuttle, Morehouse and Co., 1930, repr. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1968], p. 31) as having a “helpless son,” Maher-Shallal-Hashbaz. Another instance of the name is “Polli Carpus”: “As early as 1792 Polli Carpus Packard [1768-1836] came from Plainfield, Conn., to Jericho [Vt.], and in 1794 settled in what is known as the Packard district” (History of Jericho, Vermont [1916], p. 590); he was apparently known also as “P. Carpus” or plain “Carpus.”

The Daily Genealogist: Maine Cemeteries

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Fairmount Cemetery, Presque Isle, Maine

Fairmount Cemetery, established in 1864, is south of Presque Isle, Maine. Presque Isle is located in Aroostook County in far northern Maine. According to the website, Fairmount is the largest cemetery in northern Maine. More than 6,000 individuals are buried in the cemetery, 700 of whom were war veterans.

The following is a simplified description of the burial-recording process for this cemetery. A research team from the University of Maine at Presque Isle has conducted a project to develop a burial database and map the cemetery using GPS, GIS, and web GIS technologies. The project involved faculty and students, and community associations such as the Fairmont Cemetery Association and the Northern Maine Historical Society. For a complete description of the project, click the “About the Project” tab.

Click “Explore the Cemetery” to open the search page. There are two ways to search for a burial. You can scroll to the dropdown list at the bottom of the page. When you choose a name from the alphabetical list, the individual’s plot will be highlighted in red on the map (you may need to zoom in). Click the plot to open a window with information about the person interred there and a photograph of the gravestone. The information provided includes personal information, military/civil service, plot site information, and GPS coordinates. Plots with gravestones showing no year of death have been excluded, with the exception of those showing a birth year prior to 1925.

Municipal Cemeteries, Bangor, Maine

Bangor, in Penobscot County, Maine, is home to four municipal cemeteries. Three are maintained by the city — Pinegrove, Oakgrove, and Maplegrove. The Mt. Hope Cemetery Corporation maintains the city section of the fourth, Mt. Hope Cemetery.

At thirteen acres, Pinegrove Cemetery, established in the nineteenth cemetery, is the largest of the three city-maintained cemeteries. Oakgrove Cemetery was also established during the nineteenth century. At four acres, Maplegrove Cemetery is the smallest. Mt. Hope Cemetery was established in 1834, the year Bangor was incorporated.

Click the “Cemetery Interment Listing” link in the “Cemetery Links” to download an alphabetical listing of individuals interred in Pinegrove, Oakgrove, and Maplegrove Cemeteries. There are more than 6,500 records in the database. The data fields include ID number, name of the deceased, cemetery abbreviation, lot number, grave number, and date of death.

Click the “Mount Hope Cemetery” link to open the cemetery’s webpage. There are nearly 29,000 records in the burial database, which comprises the city-owned section as well as a private cemetery. To open the search page, click “Interment Records.”

The database can be searched by name, death year, and birth year. The data in the immediate search results includes full name, date born, where born, when died, where died, and when buried. Click a name for additional information about the deceased, including parents’ names (if known), age at death, lot information, and funeral director’s name. An annotated cemetery map provides information on some well-known individuals buried in the cemetery, as well as a photo gallery.


The Daily Genealogist A Note from the Editor: A Featured Blog

 Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Managing Editor

Our latest blog profile features Marian’s Roots and Rambles, written by New England genealogist and house historian Marian Pierre-Louis. (You may already be familiar with Marian through her role as a regular webinar presenter for Legacy Family Tree Webinars and Family Tree University.) Here, Marian introduces her blog:

Roots and Rambles is a general interest blog that covers a broad range of topics including interviews, book reviews, technology, social media, speaker tips, family memoirs, and the latest goings on in the genealogical community. It's a refreshing blog that will give you advice on getting organized or make you think about what it means to be a family historian. Marian's Roots and Rambles has a strong following, and some of the best discussions happen in the comments. As a full-time historical researcher, I wanted a place to write about all the things I encounter on my daily journey through history. My blog gives me the opportunity to share my passion for genealogy and history with the world at large.


The Daily Genealogist: The Self-Written Obituary: The Hottest Thing in Dying

 Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

"Having done all they can to dictate exactly how their funerals will go — down to playlists, menus, and off-beat hearses — baby boomers, and some members of the Silent Generation, are now taking control over the story of their lives."

The Daily Genealogist: Family Meets Daughter of Last American Soldier Killed in Vietnam

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Research and DNA testing unites a woman born in Vietnam with the parents of her American soldier father.

The Daily Genealogist: Calendar Clock Strikes a Chord in Kentwood Man's Family History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A long-lost photo yields clues to the role a clock has played in a family. From the Prized Possessions series at Grand Rapids Press.

The Daily Genealogist: Digging into Plymouth's Slave History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

 "An excavation this summer in a small shed and nearby grounds on North Street has yielded more than 30,000 artifacts dating back 1,000 years."

The Weekly Genealogist Survey: Family Association

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether you attended (or will attend) a family reunion in 2012.
28%, Yes, I will attend a family reunion in 2012.
72%, No, I will not attend a family reunion in 2012.

This week's survey asks whether you belong to a family association. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist Name Origins: Argentine

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Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

ARGENTINE (f): Derived from the Latin argentum, “silver,” this name was used by descendants of Benjamin and Argentine/Archintine (Cromwell) Cram (m. Hampton, N.H. 28 Nov. 1662) (VRs 1:556) of Hampton, N.H. (Argentine was the daughter of Giles Cromwell.) Argentine Cram (1693-1771), daughter of John and Mary (Wadleigh) Cram (VRs, p. 87) and granddaughter of Benjamin and Argentine, married Abraham Brown (1689-1769) of Hampton Falls, N.H., at Hampton, 6 Feb. 1717. Benjamin and Argentine’s daughter Hannah Cram m. Hampton 26 Oct. 1693 William Fifield, and some years later had Argentine Fifield (TAG 15:220).

The Daily Genealogist Spotlight: Onondaga County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Databases

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Visitor Services Representative

Onondaga County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Databases

Onondaga County is located in the west central part of the state of New York. Its county seat is Syracuse. The Onondaga County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Department has produced and uploaded a number of “one-of-a-kind” searchable databases to its website. Several have been added since I last profiled this website in 2008.

1855 and 1865 New York State Census for Onondaga County
The 1855 index includes the city of Syracuse and some or all of the towns of Clay, Cicero, Dewitt, Geddes, Manlius, and Salina. The index contains 5,432 records. The 1865 index, which contains 8,143 records, includes the city of Syracuse and some or all of the towns of Geddes, Lysander, Manlius, Onondaga, Salina, and Van Buren. Both census databases can be searched by: last name, first name, middle name, title, visitation number, and “town-ward-district number.”

Necrology
This database serves as an index to deaths of residents of Onondaga County. The list was derived from a number of sources, which include WPA records, “Minnie Kellogg’s deaths from Syracuse newspapers and directories between 1850-1880,” and obituaries found in Syracuse newspapers. Most of the deaths occurred prior to 1900. The database may be searched by last name, first name, maiden/other name, age, death year, month, day, source, citation, notes, cemetery, mother, father, spouse, event date, date, and record number. The data fields in the search results vary depending upon the search terms used.

Obituary Clippings
This index to obituary clippings from Syracuse newspapers covers 1862 through 1992. The clippings are from the library’s Local History/Genealogy Department. The collection also includes clippings related to other types of records, such as marriages and probate. You can search the index by last name, first name, and/or record number. The data fields in the search results are last name, first name, call number, volume and page number, note, and record number. You may order a copy of the clipping from the Local History/Genealogy Department.

Timeline
Using various sources, the timeline covers major local events from 1654 through 1994. You can search the timeline by record number, event, date, year, notes, and citation. The data fields in the search results include record number, event, date, and year. To view all records for a particular year, search by year only.

Woodlawn Cemetery
Woodlawn Cemetery, on the east side of Syracuse, is one of the largest in the county. There are more than 46,000 records in the index. The search fields are last name, first name, year, month, day of death, section, lot, grave number, mausoleum code, row, tier number, block number, and record number. The data fields in the results returned include last name, first name, section and lot number, and year, month, and day of death.

Onondaga County WPA Files
Individuals working for the Works Progress Administration during the Depression compiled a card index for items of general and historic value to the region from the newspaper files of the Syracuse Public Library and the Historical Scrap Books of the Onondaga Historical Association. The original index has been digitized and uploaded to the library’s website. It covers 1814 through 1900 and contains nearly 53,000 records. The index can be searched by the following: last name, first name, notes, event date, source, and date of appearance in the source document. The data fields include event (type), last name, first name, notes, event date, source, page citation, date of publication, and record number.


The Daily Genealogist: The History Within Summer Homes

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

On my recent Minnesota vacation, my family and I spent a day at my aunt and uncle’s cabin on Fish Trap Lake, near Cushing, Morrison County, Minnesota. The cabin was purchased by my aunt’s parents in the mid-1960s, and by now many generations of extended family members have spent time at the house. I remember being there as a child, and now I’ve brought my own children. Revisiting the lake house made me realize how summer homes have the potential to remain more firmly rooted in the past than a permanent residence. While families may move their year-round home many times over the decades — in the process weeding out possessions and clearing out estates after deaths — the family summer home can remain more or less the same. And a summer place is much more likely to be occupied over time by many generations of extended family. Pictures on the wall, books on the shelves, and even spices in the kitchen cabinet might stretch back a number of years into a family’s past. My aunt’s parents died many years ago now, but the road to the cabin is still signposted with her father’s first and last names.

For more than fifty years, my husband’s family has enjoyed the hospitality of friends who own a lake home — a Quonset hut on Lake Travis, near Lago Vista, Texas. I made my first trip there in 1988, and our annual Labor Day visits are still highlight of our year. The patio features names and hand prints in the cement from 1947, and we can do puzzles and play board games that might be considered antique. Much of our weekend menu is predetermined: Saturday always features barbeque that has smoked all day long and breakfast is always accompanied by Sally’s coffee cake.

For a New England perspective, The Big House: A Century in the Life of an American Summer Home by George Howe Colt, has been recommended to me. The author contemplates his family’s house, built in 1903 on Cape Cod, and the generations of family that it held during the summer prior to it being sold. 

In examining the history of a family, summer home histories, events, and activities are probably easy to overlook since they are somewhat removed from normal life. But it is precisely because these houses are out of step with ordinary time that summer places can become repositories for valued family artifacts, stories, and traditions. If you are fortunate enough to have a special summer place, think about mining this information for your family history the next time you visit.

Here are some stories shared by readers:

Lori Miranda of Fernandina Beach, Florida:
My great-grandmother bought a house in 1912 on Cape Cod which allowed me to check the “100 years or more” box in last week’s survey. While the world may have changed a good deal in that century, the house still exists at a slower pace; until two years ago, it still had a two-seater outhouse. And we still do the dishes by first boiling water.

Nancy (Hickman) Eldblom of Ojai, California:
My Boston great-grandfather, Alden E. Viles, built a summer home in the Phillips Beach section of Swampscott, Mass., about 1905. Alden died ten years later, but his wife Carrie Ella Simonds, daughter Barbara Viles, and her husband, Arthur Payne Crosby, lived in the house from Memorial Day through Labor Day each year until Carrie died in 1944 and the house was sold. Younger members of the family spent varying amounts of vacation time in that grand home over the years.

Nancy Buell of Brookline, Massachusetts:
I've vacationed in Georgetown, Maine, every summer since 1955. My grandfather, Sewall Webster, Sr., helped develop Indian Point there as a summer community. My family lived in Seattle and we visited my grandparents in Indian Point in the 1940s for a couple of summers while still living there. Then, in the fall of 1954, we moved back east, and my parents bought their own cottage. Now there are ten cottages belonging to relatives of mine on the Point. We love seeing extended family every summer.


The Daily Genealogist: My DNA Family

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Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

New information about an Australian’s paternal ancestry came to light after the genetic testing of recently-discovered remains on World War I battlefields in France.

The Daily Genealogist: Bull Family Celebrates Its History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Descendants of Sarah Wells and William Bull of Hamptonburgh, Orange County, New York, held their 145th annual picnic and reunion earlier this month and celebrated the 300th anniversary of Sarah Wells’ arrival in town.

The Daily Genealogist: R.I. Woman Uncovers Piece of Infamous Marshall House Flag, Alexandria History

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A scrap of material found among her great-grandfather’s Civil War souvenirs led a Rhode Island woman on a journey of discovery.

The Daily Genealogist Survey: Family Reunions

 Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked whether your family has (or had) a special summertime vacation spot. The results are:

21%, Yes, my family visited the same vacation destination for 1 to 10 years.
16%, Yes, my family visited the same vacation destination for 11 to 25 years.
11%, Yes, my family visited the same vacation destination for 26 to 50 years.
6%, Yes, my family visited same vacation destination for 51 to 75 years.
2%, Yes, my family visited the same vacation destination for 76 to 99 years.
2%, Yes, my family visited the same vacation destination for 100 years or more.
42%, No, my family does not return to a particular vacation destination.

This week's survey asks whether you have attended (or will attend) a family reunion in 2012. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Numa Pompilius

(Name Origins) Permanent link
 
Julie Helen Otto

Julie Helen Otto
Staff Genealogist

NUMA POMPILIUS (m): Numa Pompilius Rose (Canandaigua Co., N.Y. 28 April 1811–Ann Arbor, Mich. 24 June 1899, a Civil War veteran), a younger son of Jairus and Zilpha (Gillett) Rose of Granville, Mass., and Canandaigua and Niagara Cos., N.Y. (Eretta Rose Starr, The Ancestry and Descendants of Jairus Rose and Zilpha Gillett [Portage, Wash., 1930], p. 71), was named for the legendary Roman king (actually a Sabine), successor of Romulus; aided by the nymph Egeria, King Numa Pompilius drew up the Roman religious law. The seven ancient kings of Rome (who ruled from the founding of Rome, traditionally by Romulus in 753 B.C., until the establishment of the Roman Republic) were chronicled by the Roman historian Livy [Titus Livius Patavicinus, ca. 59 B.C.?–ca. 17 A.D.?] in the early books of his History of Rome. Numa Pompilius was the second of the seven legendary kings, after Romulus the founder; he was said to have built the famous temple of Janus, and to have originated many of the earliest Roman priesthoods, occupational guilds, and political institutions.

The Daily Genealogist: Hancock County Historical Society, Mississippi

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Hancock County Historical Society, Mississippi

Hancock County is in southern Mississippi. It is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico to the south and by Louisiana to the west. The Hancock County Historical Society has made a number of resources available on its website. Go to the Research/Reference tab and choose an option from the drop down list.

Hancock County Cemeteries
The Hancock County Historical Society has created an online inventory of individuals buried in more than fifty county cemeteries. Click on the Hancock County Cemetery Index to browse the consolidated database by last name. There are more than 13,500 records in the index. The data fields in the index are last name, first name, birth, death, cemetery, and grave location. Click on the individual record to open the specific cemetery page. The data fields for the listings contain a comments field. Information found in this field includes military service, age and more. You may also click on the cemetery name and go directly to the alphabetical burial list.

Hancock County census records
This database is an index of the 1820, 1830 and 1840 censuses. (The 1820 census is the earliest one taken for Mississippi.) To browse the index, click on a letter to view all last names starting with that letter, or click on the census year to view the records in the order in which they were recorded. The data fields include last name, first name, year, page, and record number.

Catholic Church Records
This database includes digitized marriage and baptismal books from Our Lady of the Gulf Church in Bay Saint Louis, and the Church of the Annunciation in Kiln. There are nearly 53,000 records in this database, covering the years 1847 through 1911. “The names of all parties involved have been extracted individually, so anyone who is mentioned in these records, be they a parent, a godparent, a witness, or else, is included in this index.” Click the database link to browse the index by last name. Click on the record of an individual to view all of the information available for that person.

Hancock County Marriage Index
This index includes marriages recorded from 1849 to 1956. To browse the index, click on a letter to view all last names starting with that letter. The names of the bride, the groom, and witnesses are included. Brides are listed under their maiden and married names. Beginning in 1938, the names of the parents of both the bride and groom were recorded by the Court and are included in the database. Click on the record to view detailed information.

Hancock County Divorce Index
This database indexes of all Hancock County divorces from 1916 to 1950. To browse the index, click on a letter to view all last names starting with that letter. The data fields in the database include last name, first name, plaintiff / defendant, case number and year.

Hancock County Obituary Index
This database includes the obituaries on file at the Hancock County Historical Society. To browse the index, click on a letter to view all last names starting with that letter. Click on a record to view a transcription of the individual’s published obituary.

Early Hancock County Land Records
Early Hancock County land records were destroyed in a courthouse fire in 1853. Following the fire there was an effort to re-register the previously registered deeds and claims. There were three deed books – A, B and C. The website contains a transcription of the records recorded in Deed Book B. Copies of the original deeds are at the Historical Society.


The Daily Genealogist: Reunited, 22 Nurses Recall WWII service

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

 Twenty-two women who served in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps gathered in Quincy, Massachusetts, to reminisce about their training and service. More information about the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps can be found at www.uscadetnurse.org/.

The Daily Genealogist: Are You Asking the Right Questions While Researching Your Family Tree?

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Columnist Lynda Rego reminds readers why it is so important to interview parents and grandparents about family history.

The Daily Genealogist: Rediscovered Headstones Hold Clues To California Quake

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Gravestones that fractured during the 1906 earthquake are being pieced together at the Gilliam Cemetery, near Sebastopol, sixty miles north of San Francisco.

The Weekly Genealogist Survey: Summer vacation spot

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked how many U.S. states you have visited. The results are:

1%, 1 to 5 states.
5%, 6 to 10 states.
18%, 11 to 20 states.
22%, 21 to 30 states.
20%, 31 to 40 states.
29%, 41 to 49 states.
5%, All 50 states!

This week's survey asks whether your family has (or had) a special summertime vacation spot. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: South Carolina Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Lexington County Probate Court Records, South Carolina

Lexington County is located in central South Carolina. The town of Lexington is its county seat. The Lexington County Probate Court has made estate and marriage license databases available on its website. To access the databases click on the links at the end of the page. 

Estate (1865 – 1994) and Marriage Indexes (1911 – 1987)
The indexes in this section have been scanned from the original paper indexes and uploaded to the site as PDF files. Estate records indexes are organized alphabetically and separated by year. Data fields in the estate records include date, name of deceased, executor or administrator, box, parcel, will book and page number. Marriage license records are organized alphabetically by bride’s surname or groom’s surname, and separated by year. Data fields in the index include license number, name and residence of man, name and residence of woman, their ages, race, date of application / license, date of marriage, by whom married and where, and comments.

The probate court has added two databases indexing more recent records. One indexes estate records from 1995 through the present. Data fields for the estate records are case number, case type, decedent's name, date of birth, date of death, date opened, case status, and Personal Representative & Attorney Information. The last field is a "view" button -- click to learn the names of the personal representative and attorney on the case. The other database is a marriage license index from 1986 through the present, which can be searched by bride or groom. Data fields for this index are license number, bride's name, groom's name, issue date, and marriage date.

Death Indexes, Spartanburg County Public Library, South Carolina – Update from 2006

Spartanburg, located in northwestern South Carolina, is the county seat of Spartanburg County. The Spartanburg County Public Library has made a number of obituary and death indexes available on its website.

Each index is formatted alphabetically; many are grouped by year. They include the name of the deceased as it appeared in the obituary, age, place of death or residence, name of spouse, and date and page on which the obituary appeared. Obituaries for individuals with clear local connections only have been included in the index. Search by keyword, name, or place of death, or browse alphabetical lists. Copies of obituaries can be ordered from the library for a small fee.

The databases are:

Spartanburg Herald and Herald-Journal Death Index – 1920 – 1922 and 1930 – 2011
This database indexes obituaries and death notices found in the above named newspapers. Indexing for the period from 1923 – 1929 is in progress.

Spartanburg Herald / Herald Journal Death Index – 1902 – 1919
The primary source for this obituary and death notice index is the Spartanburg Herald, with additional information from the Spartanburg Journal or the Spartanburg Weekly Herald. There are gaps in this database.

Carolina Spartan / Spartanburg Herald Death Index – roughly 1849 - 1893
These indexes contain obituaries from the Carolina Spartan and Spartanburg Herald newspapers. There are gaps throughout and the following years are missing: 1852, 1865, and 1877-78. The date in the record is the publication date of the death notice.

Register of Deaths of Spartanburg, South Carolina
This alphabetical index was compiled from the Register of Deaths of Spartanburg, an early attempt by the city to record deaths. These records span October 1, 1895, through October 21, 1897, and August 3,1903, through December 31, 1915. The index contains death records for residents of the city of Spartanburg only. Data fields include name of the deceased, sex, race, cause of death and date of death.

Miscellaneous Death Index
This death index is drawn from more than a half-dozen Spartanburg newspapers. It ranges from 1844 into the early 1900s; however, there are large time gaps in this database.


The Daily Genealogist: More House History Stories

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

We received a number of additional interesting house history stories this week so we present one more look at this topic.

Bill Powers of Rutland, Vermont:
I wrote an article for the current summer issue of Rutland Magazine, "100 Summers at Lake Dunmore," which chronicles the history of my family’s 100-year old camp. The story combines a history of the camp along with a bit of family genealogy since the 1950s. 

Margaret G. Fish of Reno, Nevada:
In about 1980, my daughter and her family were transferred to New Hampshire, and they bought a house in Madbury (once part of Dover). While living with them, I started genealogy (thanks to NEHGS!) and discovered that the land on which the house was built was owned by a direct ancestor way back in 1650! This was after I had lived for seventy years in thirteen other states, from Massachusetts to Florida to California.

Jane Thompson of Scituate, Massachusetts:
I am writing a history of the First Cliff neighborhood in Scituate. I have researched the ownership of about 55 properties back to the 1600s, and I am also writing biographies of most of the homeowners. It will probably be published after about three years of research. It was NOT as difficult as I thought it would be!

Henry Karl Voigt of Newark, Delaware:
My grandmother was raised on Mystic Street in Medford, Mass., in a house previously owned by her great-grandmother, Louise Campbell Fowler Pierpont, and her second husband, John Pierpont, the fiery abolitionist writer and preacher. The home was, unfortunately, taken down in 1951 to make room for six postwar "tract" houses, which would normally render a house history moot. However, my grandmother's father — Boston architect Lyman Sise — had fortuitously built a scale model of the house back in the 1930s, and the model survives to this day.

Jeff Hecht of Auburndale, Massachusetts:
A few years ago, I got a call from a lawyer trying to pin down title to a house previously owned by my grandmother in Saratoga Springs, New York. I knew family ownership went back to at least her grandfather, who had built, bought, or expanded it in the 1840s. (She claimed that the house was built about 1828, but city records only date to the 1840s.) My late father sold the house in 1978 or 1979, after my grandmother's death. (When I checked the house’s title then, we found — to our amazement — that the owner was still listed as my great-grandfather, who had died in 1932.) The current owner was having title problems because of ambiguities in a 1935 will. I explained enough of the tangle to satisfy the lawyer, and in the process learned some things I had not known — starting with the fact that the house was the oldest surviving one in town. Genealogists should check title records of family homes, which might reveal some surprises. No one had ever mentioned that my grandmother had lost title to the house in the late 1940s, for nonpayment of taxes, and had somehow gotten it back.

Margaret B. MacNeill of Indialantic, Florida: 
House history researchers should remember that many cities and towns have either renamed or renumbered streets, and all those carefully notated labels on snapshots, letters, and other records may not be applicable anymore.

Janet Doerr of Augusta, Maine:
I am lucky that my research on my family's properties has been easy: they've been in the family since 1789. My brother's house was built by our great-great-great-great grandfather, George Reed, in 1789, and has been in the family ever since. I own the property next to his, the oldest unaltered residence in Augusta, built by a cousin in 1789. Only four families have lived my house, which was passed from the original builder, Asa Williams, to his son to another cousin and on to my parents. I inherited the property from them. I don't know how unusual this "familial chain of title" is, but it makes for easy research and a very lengthy family history; I'm working on the stories!


The Daily Genealogist: Online DNA Mapping Helps Siblings Find Each Other

 Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Genetic testing company 23andme has alerted its clients to potential diseases, identified cousins — and even revealed previously unknown siblings.

The Daily Genealogist: Tombstone Technologies Have Advanced

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Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

Some thoughts on gravestones, including some of the more recent developments.

The Daily Genealogist: Peering into the Exquisite Life of Rare Books

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Powers Jean

Jean Powers
Associate Editor

A close-up look at the University of Virginia’s annual Rare Book School.

The Weekly Genealogist Survey: How many states have you visited?

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week’s survey asked the age of your current residence. The results are:

<1%, Before 1700.
1%, Between 1701 and 1799.
3%, Between 1800 and 1849.
5%, Between 1850 and 1899.
17%, Between 1900 and 1949.
61%, Between 1950 and 1999.
13%, Between 2000 and 2012.

This week's survey asks how many states you have visited. Take the survey now!


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