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The Daily Genealogist: Cemetery Databases: Washington, Illinois, and Missouri

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Camas Cemetery, Camas, Washington
The city of Camas is located in Clark County, Washington, right on the Washington-Oregon border. The Camas cemetery has been owned and operated by the city since 2007. City staff have compiled, preserved, and verified burial records from the cemetery's more than 100 years of operation. The resulting alphabetical database is available in PDF format under the "Cemetery database" link on the city's website. The data fields in the database are surname, first name, lot/block, date of birth, place of birth, date of death, and place of death. There is also a cemetery map on the website.

Galva Cemetery, Galva, Illinois

The city of Galva is located in Henry County, Illinois, in the central northwestern part of the state. The city has made the burial database for Galva Cemetery available on its website. Click the "cemetery database" link to open the login page. Next click "Login as Guest" and then the "Internment [sic] Records" link to open the alphabetical database. You can browse through the list or perform a search. The data fields are last name, first name, middle name, interment date, cost of interment, grave location, undertaker name, city and state, number of the interment, page and book number, sexton name, funeral home, and comments. Click on the "View" link to access a more consolidated view of the record. You will also find cemetery maps on the site.

Old Lorimier Cemetery, Cape Girardeau, Missouri
The city of Cape Girardeau is located in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, in the southeastern part of the state. The city has made a burial database for Old Lorimier Cemetery available on its website. The cemetery, which is believed to have more than 6,500 burials, was established in 1808. You will find a detailed history of the cemetery on the site's main page. Click "Burials A - Z" to access the alphabetical list of burials. The data fields are name of the deceased, date of birth, date of death, section, and grave.


The Daily Genealogist: Centenarian Ancestors

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked about Cape Cod ancestors. 3,741 people answered the survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:
•    39%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors lived on Cape Cod.    
•    13%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors lived on Martha's Vineyard.    
•    15%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors lived on Nantucket.    
•    1%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors lived on the Elizabeth Islands.    
•    2%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors lived on another island off Cape Cod.    
•    37%, No, none of my ancestors lived on Cape Cod or the Islands.    
•    19%, I don't know whether any of my ancestors lived on Cape Cod or the Islands.    

This week's survey was prompted by a recent Vita Brevis blog post by editor Scott Steward on centenarians. The survey asks if you have any ancestors who were centenarians. Take the survey now!



The Daily Genealogist: Provincetown History Preservation Project

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Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Provincetown History Preservation Project, Massachusetts

Provincetown is located in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, at the very tip of Cape Cod. The Provincetown History Project was "conceived by Town Hall staff and concerned citizens . . .  to preserve important historical documents in the Town's care through the process of digitization, thereby assuring greater access to the information." The project initially focused its preservation efforts on documents and images that were part of the Provincetown Heritage Museum, which closed its doors in 1999.

View the project's extensive collections by browsing or performing a search. Click the Browse link to view the alphabetical list of collections, including Annual Town Reports, Moving Picture & Oral History, Municipal Collection, School Collection, and Stand Alone Documents.

Annual Town Reports: This collection covers the period from 1870 through 1979. These reports include vital records information, in addition to information related to the town's schools, politics and government, and Board of Selectmen.

Moving Picture & Oral History Collection: In collaboration with Provincetown Community Television (PTV), home movies and oral histories have been made available through this project. The items vary in length and may take a long time to load.

Municipal Collection: This digital collection is a sampling of the historical materials in the Municipal Collection in the Town Clerk's Office. Many of the items were found in the basement storage area in Provincetown Town Hall in 2007. This digital collection includes a number of photography collections, Records of Drowning at Sea, 1906 Schooner Records, Burial Location of War Veterans, Provincetown-Truro Boundary Letter (1714), Vessels/Companies and their tonnage 1884, Merchant Sailing and Motor Vessels 1918 & 1920, Winthrop Street Cemetery epitaphs, and the Provincetown High School Yearbook of 1907.

School Collection: This collection comprises materials related to the Provincetown School system. It includes digitized high school yearbooks and commencement programs from 1924 through 2013, when Provincetown High School was closed.

Stand Alone Documents: Items in this collection include Provincetown directories, a whaling log, cemetery records, list of Civil War Soldiers and Sailors (1861-1865), list of fishermen lost at sea between 1879 and 1984, photographs, postcards, maps, and memoirs.


The Daily Genealogist: Double In-Law Marriage

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked if you have Native American ancestry. 3,838 people answered the question. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:
•    1%, I am an enrolled member of a Native American tribe.    
•    5%, I have documented Native American ancestry but am not an enrolled member of a tribe.    
•    20%, I have family stories about having Native American ancestry but that ancestry has not been documented.    
•    3%, I--or one of my close family members--have DNA results that indicate Native American ancestry.    
•    4%, My family stories about having Native American ancestry were disproved by traditional research and/or DNA testing.    
•    14%, I am not sure whether I have Native American ancestry.    
•    59%, I have no Native American ancestry.    

This week's survey asks about double in-law marriage. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: The Holland Land Office Museum in Batavia, New York

(Items of Note) Permanent link
 

Jennifer Piña


At the end of the eighteenth century, the Holland Land Company, made up of a consortium of Dutch bankers, purchased 3.3 million acres in Western New York as an investment. The building in Batavia that now houses the Holland Land Office Museum was once the company's main office for selling land directly to settlers. Last month NEHGS Councilor Jennifer Piña of California toured the Holland Land Office Museum. Here she shares her impressions. --Editor  

The Holland Land Office Museum in Batavia, Genesee County, New York, houses a rich and varied collection of materials in an 1815 stone building, the third on this site. The building functioned as a land sales office from 1815 until the late 1830s, and was the first National Historic Landmark in western New York.

On a recent visit, my husband and I learned the story of how the 3.5 million-acre Holland Purchase began with a 1797 treaty between representatives of Declaration of Independence signer Robert Morris and the Seneca tribe. The Holland Land Company purchased the land from Morris and began the ambitious project of having the huge tract--which covered a large portion of what is now western New York--surveyed. (This map is helpful for visualizing the area.) Overseen by Joseph Ellicott, the survey was carried out in the thickly forested terrain using links, chains, and basic tools. Examples of these instruments, as well as an Ellicott family desk and a portrait of Joseph Ellicott, occupy a gallery recently renovated to recreate his 1815 land office.   

One gallery includes displays on two local men. Charles F. Rand, a Batavia native, was the first man in the nation to answer President Lincoln's call for volunteers at the start of the Civil War. He also received a Congressional Medal of Honor. Ely S. Parker, a member of the Seneca tribe, was educated as a lawyer and civil engineer. During the Civil War he rose to the rank of Lt. Colonel, served as Ulysses Grant's adjutant, and wrote out the terms of surrender at Appomattox. The museum holds a number of other items of interest, including uniform pieces and equipment used in the War of 1812, firearms, and drums used in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. The museum features a pioneer kitchen and the area's 1859 gibbet. Many local residents have donated items that were passed down through generations of their families.

Our tour of the museum was conducted by Jeffrey Fischer, who generously shared his knowledge of the Holland Purchase, the museum, and its contents. Museum director Jeffrey Donahue was also on hand to answer our questions. The museum does a fine job of introducing a number of intriguing historical figures and events. The AAA tour book for the area recommends allowing 30 minutes for the museum. I believe that 30 minutes should be considered a nice start!

For more on the Holland Land Company and the Holland Purchase, see Marian Henry's article, "The Holland Purchase: Pioneer Settlements in Western New York State," on AmericanAncestors.org. Three related articles--"Retracing a Vermont Family's Migration to the Holland Purchase," "The Records of the Holland Land Company in Western New York," and "Genesee Fever: The Lure of Land on the New York Frontier"--are available to NEHGS members in the fall 2009 issue of
New England Ancestors magazine.
 


The Daily Genealogist: Obituary Databases: Idaho and Texas

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Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Obituary Index, Boise Public Library, Idaho
The city of Boise, located in southwestern Idaho, is the county seat of Ada County. The Boise Public Library has made an obituary index available on its website. Enter the name of the deceased individual in the search box in last name, first name order. The data in the search results includes the full name of the deceased, newspaper title, date of publication, and page on which the obituary or death notice appears. In most cases the page number is followed by "DN" to indicate that it is a death notice or "O" or "OB" to indicate an obituary. You will find an Obituary Request Form on the search page that may be used  to order copies from the library for a fee.

Genealogy Index, Fort Bend County Libraries
Fort Bend County is located in southeastern Texas. Richmond is its county seat. The Genealogy and Local History Department of Fort Bend County Libraries has made a Genealogy Database with burial records information available on its website. A growing number of records contain digitized images of obituaries published in the Fort Bend Herald since August 1, 2007, as well as some earlier obituaries. Click the Online Database link to open the search page. Enter the name of the deceased in the search box in last name, first name order. Click the Name and Dates link in the search results to view the detailed record. For later records click View Obituary for a JPG image. In the Notes field you may find details about the deceased such as the inscription on the tombstone, cemetery name and burial information (section, lot, etc.), names of parents, spouse's name, and more.

Obituary Index, Burnet County Genealogical Society, Texas

Burnet County is located in central Texas. Burnet is its county seat. The Burnet County Genealogical Society has made an obituary index for the period from 1876 through 1910 available on its website. Click the index links in the navigation box to open the alphabetical files. The data fields are name (age is sometimes also included), city of residence, newspaper title, and date of issue.


The Daily Genealogist: Native American Ancestry

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked if you've found information on your ancestors as a result of two NEHGS initiatives: The Great Migration Study Project, which aims to treat all immigrants to New England from 1620 to 1640, and the Early New England Families Study Project, which focuses on individuals who immigrated in 1641 or later. 3,178 people answered the survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:
•    32%, I have found ancestors in The Great Migration Study Project.
•    9%, I have found ancestors in the Early New England Families Study Project.      
•    28%, I have found ancestors in both projects.    
•    20%, I haven't found ancestors in either project.              
•    13%, I'm not sure if I have found ancestors in these projects.     
•    11%, I don't have any ancestors who lived in New England in the 17th century.  

This week's survey asks if you have Native American ancestry. Take the survey now!

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