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The Daily Genealogist: Oxford Past, Connecticut

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Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Oxford Past, Connecticut
 
The town of Oxford is located in southwestern New Haven County, Connecticut. The Oxford Past website is "dedicated to providing a free database of Oxford history online." Resources include:

Cemeteries
The Cemetery Project section contains links to burial listings and headstone photographs for about twenty-five cemeteries in Oxford and surrounding communities in New Haven County, and three cemeteries in Fairfield County. Click the cemetery name for an alphabetical listing of individuals buried in that cemetery. The data fields are name, date died, age, photo, and year (when the data was collected by the W.P.A.). In most cases there is a photograph of the gravestone.

Library
In this section researchers will find numerous transcribed resources or digitized images related to cemeteries, diaries, Oxford histories, letters, the military, newspaper clippings (obituaries of local residents from area newspapers), and records (Oxford town reports between 1879 and 1944).

Photo album
Photographs of area residents are organized alphabetically by surname.
 
1850s Maps
Maps of Oxford from 1850, 1852, and 1856 show the names and locations of homes of area residents. There is also a link to the Oxford Historical Society's 1868 F. W. Beers map of Oxford.

More Projects
Links to other online Oxford resources include an Oxford Bicentennial slide show and resources related to the Candee, Chatfield, Treat, and Wheeler families.


The Daily Genealogist: Double Dating

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Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked if you have submitted genealogical corrections to an author, a compiler, or a website. 4,048 people answered the survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:
•    26%, Yes, I have sent corrections to the author, editor, or publisher of a printed book or article.    
•    61%, Yes, I have sent corrections to someone who submitted or published genealogical information online.    
•    54%, Yes, I have noted corrections to transcribed records online.    
•    14%, No, although I have seen errors in genealogical data, I have never submitted any corrections.    
•    5%, No, I have never noticed any genealogical errors that needed correcting.

This week's survey asks about your familiarity with the practice of "double dating." Take the survey now!

The Daily Genealogist: Mahoning County, Ohio Cemetery Resources

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Goshen Township Cemetery Databases, Ohio

Goshen Township is located in Mahoning County, in eastern Ohio. Its county seat is Youngstown. Goshen has made available on its website databases for Bunker Hill Cemetery, East Goshen Cemetery, and Lumberton Cemetery. Click the Cemeteries link in the contents list to access the databases, then click the cemetery links near the bottom of the page to open each database. The data fields may include lot number, lot position, owner, name of the deceased, burial date, veteran status, birth date, death date, age, purchase date and amount, funeral home, and notes.

Tod Homestead Cemetery, Ohio

Tod Homestead Cemetery is located in Youngstown, Ohio, the seat of Mahoning County. The cemetery was established in 1908. A second cemetery, the Rodef Sholom Cemetery, was relocated to the Tod Homestead Cemetery four years later. Youngstown Township Cemetery, a "potters field," was added in 1914. More than 35,000 burials are recorded in the database.

Click the "About Us" tab in the menu bar and select "Cemetery History" from the dropdown menu to learn more about the cemetery. Select "Cemetery Layout" for interactive and downloadable cemetery maps. Click "Find a Grave" on the menu bar to begin your search of the burial database. You can search the database by entering part of the first or last name. The data fields in the database are first name, last name, age, date of death, and section of the cemetery in which the deceased is buried.



The Daily Genealogist: Your Current Affiliation with NEHGS

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked how many formal genealogical interviews you have conducted with relatives. 3,448 people answered the survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:

13%, None, and I don't plan on conducting interviews in the future.    
7%, None, but I plan on conducting interviews in the future.    
8%, One    
35%, Two to four    
19%, Five to nine    
7%, Ten to fourteen    
2%, Fifteen to nineteen    
6%, Twenty or more    
4%, I don't know.    
8%, A relative has conducted a genealogical interview with me.    

This week's survey asks about your current affiliation with NEHGS. Take the survey now!

The Daily Genealogist: Notable Characters

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Our latest blog profile features "Notable Characters: A Collection of Stories that My Mother Would Love" by Deborah Martin-Plugh. Here Deborah introduces her blog:

I grew up with my mother's stories about our heritage--told in a caddywampus fashion usually while we were surrounded by boxes of photos and memorabilia--which always ended with the affirming statement that we came from "good pioneer stock." A few years ago I hauled out the old family Bible that had belonged to my great-grandparents, along with old clippings, tintypes, and cabinet cards that had been tucked away, and began the business of building the family history.

I trace back my family to Mayflower passengers Edward Fuller and John Billington, and a number of other Great Migration immigrants to New England. I also descend from Huguenot and Dutch families who settled New Amsterdam, and Quakers of Long Island, the Hudson Valley, and beyond.  

After corresponding with many family members and fellow researchers, I promised to establish a blog. In the fall of 2010, I published my first post. Since I knew more about my mother's family, I began to share the stories of my genealogical journey with her family and then went on to include my father's ancestry. My posts reflect my field trips and networking experiences, but also my awareness that genealogy is about the lives of human beings and the times in which they lived.

Because my blog opened me up to a larger network of family members, researchers, associations, museum archivists, and historians, I was prompted to start my FaceBook page, "The Genealogist's Inkwell."

I see my blog as a wonderful two-way street that allows me to share and learn with a broader readership. 2014 plans include a trip to New Bedford, Massachusetts, to pursue more information about the whaling community and my seafaring ancestors and a trip to Somerset


The Daily Genealogist: Miller County Museum, Missouri

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Miller County Museum, Missouri

Miller County is located in central Missouri. Tuscumbia is the county seat. The Miller County Museum has made a number of resources available on its website.

The county map on the site's homepage contains links to brief histories of townships organized in 1837/8. The tabs on the drop-down menu bar link to a number of resources for Miller County.

The Yesterdays tab provides articles about people, commerce and industry, life during the Civil War, transportation, organizations, and historically significant events. The Cultural Resources tab includes articles about the county's history, churches, bridges, schools, homesteads, and cemeteries, as well as a variety of different farms, barns, and landmarks. The Communities tab provides articles (and, in some cases, maps and photographs) on sixteen communities within the county. The Publications tab contains many resources, including fourteen transcribed letters, and articles from several sources.

The Library tab includes the following sections:

Probate Records: This alphabetical index to Miller County probate records includes last name, first name, middle, probate date, DR number, additional info, and case number.

Guardianship Records: This alphabetical index to Miller County guardianships beginning in the 1830s includes last name, first name, date filed, and guardian's name.

Marriage Records: This section contains alphabetical brides and grooms indexes for Miller, Maries, and Osage Counties. For Miller and Maries Counties, the data fields are bride name, marriage date, groom name, and marriage place. For Osage County, the data fields are bride name, marriage date, groom name, and comments.

Obituaries Indexes: This section contains an alphabetical index and four volumes of transcribed obituaries. Click the arrow to the left of the database title to access these resources.

Cemeteries Location Index: This database is an index to the cemeteries of Miller County. Click the cemetery name to access U.S. Geological Survey location and features information.


The Daily Genealogist: Genealogical Interviews with Relatives

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Weekly Genealogist Survey
Last week's survey asked about publishing your family history. 3,849 people answered the survey. More than one answer could be selected. The results are:
•    48.4%, I have put together an informal notebook or informally bound printout for myself, my family, or others.   
•    16.0%, I have written one or more articles about my family history for a genealogical society or family association newsletter.   
•    4.3%, I have written one or more articles about my family history for a genealogical magazine (American Ancestors, Family Tree, Family Chronicle, etc.)   
•    3.0%, I have written one or more articles about family history for a peer-reviewed journal (Register, TAG, NGSQ, etc.)   
•    5.3%, I have published a book of family photos (or other images) through an online service such as Shutterfly.com.   
•    1.7%, I have written a full-length book, which I have produced myself by working directly with an online publisher/printer such as CreateSpace or Lightning Source.   
•    4.9%, I have written a full-length book, which I have produced myself by working directly with a commercial book printer.   
•    1.1%, I have written a full-length book, which one or more vendors or freelancers (designer, editor, indexer) has helped me self-publish.   
•    1.0%, I have written a book and published it with a traditional publisher (NEHGS, GPC, etc.).   
•    10.5%, I have written about my family history for an enewsletter, blog, or website.   
•    1.4%, I have written a family history and published it as an e-book.   
•    39.4%, I have not yet written my family history but would like to do so.   
•    12.2%, I do not intend to write my family history.   
This week's survey asks about conducting genealogical interviews with relatives. Take the survey now!

The Daily Genealogist: Valley Forge National Historical Park

(A Note from the Editor) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week Massachusetts public schools were closed for February vacation. While many of my children's friends escaped to warm destinations like Florida and Puerto Rico, my two ten-year-olds and I headed to a historic site in Pennsylvania closely identified with harsh winter conditions: Valley Forge. Some friends questioned why we'd choose to visit the park in February, particularly since the Northeast has endured so much cold and snow this year, but I maintained that we'd have a much more authentic experience than if we visited in, say, July. (Our Presidents' Day visit was great--although we were disappointed that we had to forgo a visit to Washington's headquarters, the Isaac Potts house, which was closed due to icy conditions.)

Valley Forge National Historical Park, located twenty miles northwest of Philadelphia, is famous for serving as the encampment site of the Continental Army from December 1777 through June 1778. The approximately 12,000 troops under the command of General George Washington built a city of 2,000+ log huts. In addition to foraging and seeing to their own needs, the men patrolled and drilled. The National Park Service brochure speculates that "Perhaps the most important outcome of the encampment was the army's maturation into a more professional force." Former Prussian officer Baron Friedrich von Steuben arrived in February 1778 and led a training program "that gave the troops a new sense of purpose and helped sustain them through many trials as they stuck to the task of securing independence." The eighteen-minute orientation film, "Valley Forge: A Winter Encampment," shown at the park's theater, can be viewed online; shorter YouTube videos on specific topics related to Valley Forge can be seen here.

Do you think your ancestor was at Valley Forge? The Valley Forge Muster Roll, a project of the nonprofit Friends of Valley Forge Park, can help you find out. By using kiosks at the park visitor center or a searchable database online, you can determine what regiments were present during the Valley Forge encampment. (Regiments were present from Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia.) You can also search for particular soldiers by last name or partial last name. The information in the Valley Forge Muster Roll has been compiled from original muster rolls, payroll records, pensions, letters, orders, and other contemporary primary documents.       


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