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The Daily Genealogist: Ancestors' First Language

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week's survey asked how far removed you are from your most recent immigrant ancestor. 4,741 people answered this survey. The results are:

1%,  I am an immigrant.
5%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a parent.
26%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a grandparent.
31%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a great-grandparent.
13%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a second great-grandparent.
5%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a third great-grandparent.
3%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a fourth great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a fifth great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a sixth great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a seventh great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is an eighth great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a ninth great-grandparent.
2%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a tenth great-grandparent.
1%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is an eleventh great-grandparent.
1%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a twelfth great-grandparent.
1%,  My most recent immigrant ancestor is a thirteenth or earlier great-grandparent.
1%,  I don't know how far removed I am from an immigrant ancestor.

This week's survey asks if you or any of your more recent ancestors spoke a first language other than English. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Artifacts from NEHGS Collection Exhibited at Ellis Boston Antiques Show

(Items of Note) Permanent link
 

Jim Power, Jr.
Director of Marketing & Sales

Last weekend NEHGS presented a special exhibition in conjunction with the 2013 Ellis Boston Antiques Show. Thousands of visitors from Boston and beyond viewed "Family Treasures from Early Massachusetts," the first exhibition in twenty years of some of our rare fine art and furniture.

The artifacts included a genealogical chart illustrating Benjamin Franklin’s Nantucket ancestry, John Hancock’s armchair from his Beacon Hill home, and a sword belonging to former Massachusetts governor Marcus Morton. Among the other notable items were a portrait of Captain John Bonner, creator of Boston’s first engraved map; a bullet taken from the body of Dr. Joseph Warren  at the Battle of Bunker Hill; and a cane owned by Peregrine White (c. 1620–1704), the first English child born to a Pilgrim in colonial America. In addition, an oil-on-canvas portrait of Captain Paul Cuffe (1759–1817), a Quaker mariner and merchant at Westport, Massachusetts, and one of the most influential African and Native American people of his time, was displayed. 

Visitors to the NEHGS library (open daily from Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesdays until 9 p.m.) can view a sampling of some of our historic paintings and artifacts on display throughout the building. 

sword

SWORD.

Owned by Marcus Morton (1784-1864), Governor of Massachusetts, manufactured possibly by William Ketland & Co., early 19th century.
Marcus Morton was born in East Freetown, Massachusetts on February 19, 1784 to Nathaniel and Mary Cary Morton. He had a long and distinguished career as a lawyer, jurist and politician. He was Massachusetts Governor three times – appointed in 1825 to fill the term of William Eustis, elected in 1840, and chosen by the senate in 1843. He died in Taunton on February 6, 1864 and is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery.
The sword is typical of those made for U. S. military officers in England by William Ketland & Co. (c. 1780-1831). The distinctive eagle head is very typical, as is the bone grip and patterns etched in silver in the bluing – in very good condition on this sword.

Gift of Marcus Kimball, The Lord Kimball, 2010

folger family tree

FOLGER FAMILY TREE

“The Descendants of John and Peter Folger”.
Hand-drawn chart, compiled and drawn by Nantucket genealogist, William Coleman Folger, 1866.
Shows the descendants of John Folger (c. 1590-c.1660) and his son Peter (1617-1690). The Folgers are a Nantucket family with many famous descendants including Benjamin Franklin (Abiah Folger, daughter of Peter, who became the second wife of Josiah Franklin and mother to Benjamin Franklin).

Purchase by NEHGS, 7 Dec 2009

Cuffe

PORTRAIT.

By tradition, a portrait of Captain Paul Cuffe (1759-1817), oil on canvas, artist unknown (formerly attributed to Chester Harding), early nineteenth century.
This portrait, acquired by NEHGS in 2012, is, according to tradition, said to be of Captain Paul Cuffe, a Quaker mariner and merchant at Westport, Massachusetts, one of the most influential African and Native American people of his time. He was born on 17 January 1759 at Cuttyhunk Island to a freed African father and a Native American (Wampanoag) mother. The family moved to Dartmouth where they farmed. Paul took a whaling voyage and other deep water voyages and became a self-taught navigator and mariner. He petitioned Bristol County concerning taxation without representation which led to the 1783 state act to allow voting by all free male citizens. By the late 1700s he owned a fleet of trading vessels. He became a supporter of colonizing Sierra Leone with freed American slaves. He was received by President James Madison at the White House in 1812, providing Cuffe with the distinction of being the first black person other than a slave to be invited to meet with a President of the United States. Madison helped Cuffe have his ship (the brig Traveler) returned which had been impounded by US Customs for trading at British ports. Later, in Traveler, Cuffe would transport thirty-eight black colonists to Sierra Leone. He died 7 September 1817. Further research may help to establish a provenance and a more formal identification for this important portrait.

NEHGS purchase, in honor of Prof. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., 2012


The Daily Genealogist: Your Most Recent Immigrant Ancestor

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week's survey asked about your preferences for online education topics. More than one answer could be selected. 3,894 people answered this survey. The results are:

62%, Using AmericanAncestors.org for your research   
23%, NEHGS member benefits and services   
5%, Getting started in genealogy   
63%, Research tips and techniques   
48%, Organizing my materials   
54%, Using records/repositories   
49%, Technology in genealogy   
42%, Understanding my family's social/historical context   
37%, Writing/publishing my family history   
48%, Genetics and DNA studies   
2%, None of the above.   

This week's survey asks how far removed you are from your most recent immigrant ancestor. Take the survey now!

 

 


The Daily Genealogist: 125-year-old Wedding Gift Returns to Zumbrota [Minnesota] Family

 Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

125-year-old Wedding Gift Returns to Zumbrota [Minnesota] Family
An engraved silver set of sugar bowl, creamer, and spooner given as a wedding gift in Goodhue County, Minnesota, in 1888 was purchased in an antique store in Texas and returned recently to family descendants.

The Daily Genealogist: Bayliss Public Library, Michigan

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Bayliss Public Library, Michigan

The Bayliss Public Library is located in Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. The city lies on the Canadian border at the eastern tip of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. It is the seat of Chippewa County. The library has made some genealogical and historical resources related to Chippewa, Luce, and Mackinac Counties available on its website.

Click the Genealogy link to access the library's genealogical resources. Most of the resources currently on the website relate to Chippewa County. A list of genealogical societies in all three counties has also been provided.

Cemetery Transcriptions
You will find transcriptions from a variety of sources for more than 50 Chippewa County cemeteries. In some cases there is more than one transcription for a cemetery.

Biographies
Biographies for nine citizens of Chippewa County have been transcribed and uploaded to the website.

Local Records
A number of local records have been transcribed and made available on the website. These include an 1846 Annuity List of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, the Sault Ste Marie Township Census for 1827, list of children between 4 and 18 in Sault Ste Marie in 1850, voters lists from 1870, and Chippewa County marriage and death records.

Click the History Link to access the library's history resources, including a number of local history articles. For Chippewa County you will find a local history and several newspaper articles; one article related to Luce County is also available. A list of historical societies in two of the three counties is provided.

Photographs
Click the Photographs link to view nearly forty photographs, organized by subject, from the library's Gordon Daun Photograph Collection. The photographs may be viewed individually or as a slide show.


The Daily Genealogist: Lessons Learned from a Public History Project

(Items of Note) Permanent link
 

Kimberly Whitworth
guest author

Kimberly Whitworth is completing her Master's Degree in History at Salem State University. -- Editor

Over the past year I created an online map and database of the Old Burial Ground on Academy Road in North Andover, Massachusetts. Established around 1650, the Old Burial Ground holds the remains of the founding families of Andover and their descendants. The graves marking the burials--as well as the burials themselves--are of historic significance to early New England.

I developed the idea for this project during a graduate class I took last fall which considered the historical aspects of the New England landscape--the physical environment shaped by human interventions. [For those interested in learning more about this topic, I recommend two books: A Landscape History of New England (2011) and Common Landscape of America, 1580 to 1845 (1983).] Burial grounds certainly do not come immediately to mind as a landscape, but they are set in nature and created by human hands.

People often think of burial grounds as static places, where nothing changes. What I realized by the end of my project is that the map I created is merely a 2013 "snapshot" of this particular landscape. During the course of my work, I had access to prior efforts to collect and catalog the burials and markers at the site. When reviewing maps and data from the 1960s and the 1990s, it became clear the site has changed over time due to a variety of factors, including environmental damage and weather, destruction wrought by tree roots, and occasional vandalism. Some stones that were recorded in the 1960s or 1990s were missing in 2013. 

The technology I used to create the map and locate each headstone is called "GIS" or Geographic Information Systems, "a collection of computer hardware, software, and geographic data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information." Each headstone on the map represents a point collected using satellite technology. Now each headstone has a latitude and longitude line associated with each point gathered. The accuracy of each point with the system used in this project is within a meter.  

The burial ground is owned by the Town of North Andover and is under the care of the North Andover Historical Commission. I was fortunate to have Town support for the project, and assistance from many departments at Town Hall. I also had the support of the North Andover Historical Society and a few dedicated volunteers who braved some of the hottest days of the summer to take "points" with me.

Visit the Old Burial Ground website, map, and database (PDF) here.


The Daily Genealogist: Online Educational Preferences

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week's survey asked if any of your ancestors served in World War I. More than one answer could be selected. 4,139 people answered this survey. The results are:

60%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors served in the American forces.   
9%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors served with an Allied force (other than the American forces).   
2%, Yes, at least one of my ancestors was served with a Central Powers force (Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Germany, etc.)   
7%, My ancestor had been drafted/was preparing to serve at the time the war ended.   
32%, No, none of my ancestors served in World War I.   

This week's survey asks about your online educational preferences. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: Holmes Public Library, Massachusetts

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Holmes Public Library, Massachusetts
 
The Holmes Public Library is located in the town of Halifax, which is in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. The library has provided access to a number of resources in the Halifax Digital History section on its website. Click on the Reference tab in the menu bar and select Halifax History from the dropdown list.

Digital Books on Halifax History
The Holmes Public Library links to several books on various aspects of the history of Halifax. Most of the volumes are available through Internet Archive.

The Torch: Silver Lake Regional High School Yearbooks
The library also has digitized yearbooks from Silver Lake Regional High School from 1959 through 2011, available through Internet Archive. The regional high school serves the towns of Halifax, Kingston, and Plympton.

SAILS Digital History Collection
The SAILS Digital History Collection has drawn its resources from the historical collections of libraries in the SAILS library network covering forty communities in southeastern Massachusetts. Items in the SAILS digital library include cemetery records from Carver, historical postcards from West Bridgewater, Middleborough Public Library's cranberry collection, and Rochester's Historic and Architectural Survey, as well as resources from other network members in East Bridgewater, Fall River, Halifax, Hanson, Plainville, and Wrentham. The SAILS Digital History Collection is a work in progress, which will grow as member libraries add their collections.


The Daily Genealogist: NEHGS Salt Lake City Member Reception

(Items of Note) Permanent link
 
Kelly McCoulf

Kelly McCoulf
Director of Constituent Relations

NEHGS members are invited to join us for a special reception with refreshments, hors d'oeuvre, and a presentation by NEHGS experts to celebrate 35 years of NEHGS educational program research successes in Salt Lake City! Enjoy reminiscences of past trips and share your research stories with genealogists Chris Child, David Lambert, Judy Lucey, Rhonda McClure, and Suzanne Stewart.

 slc group

The reception will be held Saturday, November 9, 2013, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Radisson Hotel in Salt Lake City. Space is limited. Please register by October 31 at AmericanAncestors.org/SLC13


 SLC


The Daily Genealogist: World War I Ancestors

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week's survey asked what kind of online educational content you would be most likely to use to improve your research skills. More than one answer could be selected. 3,808 people answered this survey. The results are:

72%    Written articles/wikis   
59%    Digital books   
54%    Free webinars   
17%    Paid online courses   
44%    Informational videos   
20%    Streaming video of live events   
51%    Downloadable forms/templates   
58%    Interactive maps and timelines   
30%    Discussion forums   
5%      I would not use online education content to improve my research skills.   

This week's survey asks about World War I ancestors. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: How Slaves Would Have Cooked

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

How Slaves Would Have Cooked
"Culinary historian Michael Twitty, who recently gained national attention for his Paula Deen blog post, explores the roots of Southern food at [a] North Carolina plantation site."

The Daily Genealogist: NEHGS to Be Featured at the Ellis Boston Antiques Show

(Items of Note) Permanent link
 
Kelly McCoulf

Kelly McCoulf
Director of Constituent Relations

For the first time in nearly twenty years, NEHGS will present an outside exhibit that highlights our unique art and decorative art holdings. Our special loan exhibition will be open for viewing from October 24 to 27, 2013, at the Ellis Boston Antiques Show at the Cyclorama at the Boston Center for the Arts. Our display will include a selection of paintings, furniture, and historical artifacts that tell unique stories about notable Massachusetts families in the colonial and post-Revolutionary eras. More than forty antiques dealers from the U.S. and Europe will also be in attendance.
 
For more information on the Ellis Boston Antiques Show, please visit AmericanAncestors.org/Ellis-Antiques or EllisBoston.com.

Ellis Boston Antique Show

 

 



The Daily Genealogist: Petersburg Public Library, Alaska

(Spotlight) Permanent link
 
Valerie Beaudrault

Valerie Beaudrault
Assistant Editor

Petersburg Public Library, Alaska

Petersburg Borough is located at the northern tip of Mitkoff Island in southeast Alaska. According to the Borough's website it had a population of 3,278 at the last census.

The Petersburg Public Library has made a newspaper archive available on its website. The newspaper titles covered include Petersburg Pilot (1974-2012), Petersburg Press (1926-1973, plus a few issues in 1974), Petersburg Weekly Report (1914-1923), New Petersburg Press (1964-1966), The Petersburg Press (1932-1935), The Petersburg Herald (1924-1926), and The Progressive (1913-1914). The digital collection comprises more than 61,500 pages.

You can search the entire collection by keyword or browse by newspaper title or year and/or month of publication. Click on the page link to open a digital image of the newspaper page.

Another resource available on the library website is the Petersburg Listening Project, an initiative of the Petersburg Public Library in partnership with KFSK, the local public radio station. The Listening Project collection contains "interviews between two people who know and care about each other." They are guided through the interview by a trained facilitator. Complete interviews and excerpts, as well as photographs and background and biographical information, can be accessed by month or interviewee name. There are more than 100 interviews of over 90 individuals of all ages.


The Daily Genealogist: Online Educational Content

(Surveys) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

Last week's survey asked if you have returned to visit a childhood home. More than one answer could be selected. 4,437 people answered this survey. The results are:

89% Yes, I have revisited at least one of my childhood homes
8% No, I have never revisited a childhood home.
5% I am currently living in a childhood home.
       
This week's survey asks about online educational content. Take the survey now!


The Daily Genealogist: The Great Hurricane of 1938 -- 75th Anniversary

(Stories of Interest) Permanent link
 
Betlock Lynn

Lynn Betlock
Editor

The Great Hurricane of 1938 -- 75th Anniversary
Meteorologist David Epstein describes the devastation wrought by the Great Hurricane of 1938, which caused hundreds of deaths and produced gusts of 186 mph, recorded at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, Mass., which are still the strongest hurricane winds ever recorded in the U.S.

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